My watch list
my.bionity.com  
Login  

Asphyxia



Asphyxia
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 R09.0, T71.
ICD-9 799.0

Asphyxia (from Greek a-, "without" and σφυγμός (sphygmos), "pulse, heartbeat") is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from being unable to breathe normally. Asphyxia causes generalized hypoxia, which primarily affects the tissues and organs most sensitive to hypoxia first, such as the brain, hence resulting in cerebral hypoxia. Asphyxia is usually characterized by air hunger, but this is not always the case; the urge to breathe is triggered by rising carbon dioxide levels in the blood rather than diminishing oxygen levels. Sometimes there is not enough carbon dioxide to cause air hunger, and victims become hypoxic without knowing it. This may occur, for example, if the oxygen in the air of an enclosed space is displaced by a large amount of inert gas. In any case, the absence of effective remedial action will very rapidly lead to unconsciousness, brain damage, and death. The time to death is dependent on the particular mechanism of asphyxia.

Asphyxia is used to maim or kill in capital punishment, suicide, torture, and warfare. It is also used non-fatally in martial arts, combat sports, BDSM, and during sex as erotic asphyxia. Because the need to breathe is triggered by the level of carbon dioxide in the blood, some victims may not experience an urgent need to breathe and may remain unaware of the onset of hypoxia.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Chemical or physiological interference with respiration

Various chemical and physiological situations can interfere with the body's ability to absorb and use oxygen or regulate blood oxygen levels:

Smothering

Smothering refers to the mechanical obstruction of the flow of air from the environment into the mouth and/or nostrils, for instance, by covering the mouth and nose with a hand, pillow, or a plastic bag.[1] Smothering can be either partial or complete, where partial indicates that the person being smothered is able to inhale some air, although less than required. In a normal situation, smothering requires at least partial obstruction of both the nasal cavities and the mouth to lead to asphyxia. Smothering with the hands or chest is used in some combat sports to distract the opponent, and create openings for transitions, as the opponent is forced to react to the smothering. It is also used in BDSM as a type of facesitting.

In some cases, smothering is combined with simultaneous compressive asphyxia. One example is overlay, in which an adult accidentally rolls over an infant during co-sleeping, an accident that often goes unnoticed and is mistakenly thought to be sudden infant death syndrome.[1] Other accidents involving a similar mechanism are cave-ins or when an individual is buried in sand or grain. In homicidal cases, the term burking[2] is often ascribed to a killing method that involves simultaneous smothering and compression of the torso.[3]

Compressive asphyxia

  Compressive asphyxia (also called chest compression) refers to the mechanical limitation of the expansion of the lungs by compressing the torso, hence interfering with breathing. Compressive asphyxia occurs when the chest or abdomen is compressed posteriorly.[4] In accidents, the term traumatic asphyxia or crush asphyxia is usually used to describe compressive asphyxia resulting from being crushed or pinned under a large weight or force. An example of traumatic asphyxia includes cases in which an individual has been using a car-jack to repair a car from below, only to be crushed under the weight of the vehicle[3] when the car-jack slips. Pythons, anacondas, and other constrictor snakes kill through compressive asphyxia.

In fatal crowd disasters, contrary to popular belief, it is not the blunt trauma from trampling that causes the large part of the deaths, but rather the compressive asphyxia from being crushed against the crowd. In confined spaces, people push and lean against each other; evidence from bent steel railings in several fatal crowd accidents have shown horizontal forces over 4500 N (comparative weight approximately 460kg). In cases where people have stacked up on each other forming a human pile, estimations have been made of around 380kg of compressive weight in the lowest layer.[5]

Chest compression is also featured in various grappling combat sports, where it is sometimes called wringing. Such techniques are used either to tire the opponent or as complementary or distractive moves in combination with pinning holds,[6] or sometimes even as submission holds. Examples of chest compression include the knee-on-stomach position, or techniques such as leg scissors (also referred to as body scissors and in budo referred to as do-jime,[7] 胴絞, "trunk strangle")[8] where you wrap the legs around the opponent's midsection and squeeze them together.[9]

Pressing is a form of torture or execution that works through asphyxia.

References

  1. ^ a b Ferris, J.A.J. Asphyxia. www.pathology.ubc.ca. URL's last accessed March 1 2006 (DOC format)
  2. ^ The term "burking" comes from the method William Burke and William Hare used to kill their victims during the West Port murders. They killed the usually-intoxicated victims by sitting on their chests and suffocating them by putting a hand over their nose and mouth, while using the other hand to push the victim's jaw up. The corpses had no visible injuries, and were supplied to medical schools for money.
  3. ^ a b DiMaio, Vincent; DiMaio, Dominick (2001). Forensic Pathology, Second Edition. Selected Pages from CHAPTER 8 and from Deaths Occurring Following the Application of Choke or Carotid Holds. www.charlydmiller.com. URL last accessed March 2 2006.
  4. ^ Jones, Richard. Strangulation. www.forensicmed.co.uk. URL last accessed February 26 2006.
  5. ^ Fruin, John. The Causes and Prevention of Crowd Disasters. www.crowddynamics.com. URL last accessed March 3 2006.
  6. ^ Ohlenkamp, Neil Principles of Judo Choking Techniques. judoinfo.com. URL last accessed on March 3 2006
  7. ^ Do-jime is a prohibited technique in Judo, (The Kodokan Judo Institute. Kodokan.Org classification of techniques. www.kodokan.org. URL last accessed March 4 2006.) and is considered a 'slight infringement' according to IJF rules, Section 27: Prohibited acts and penalties, article 21. It should not be confused with do-osae, which is a colloquial term for the guard position.
  8. ^ International Judo Federation. IJF Referee Rules. www.ijf.org. URL last accessed March 6 2006
  9. ^ Lewis, Bill. Katsuhiko Kashiwazaki - Shimewaza (Book Review). www.bjj.org. URL last accessed March 4 2006.

Further reading

  • The Physiology, Pathology, and Treatment of Asphyxia by James Phillips Kay-Shuttleworth, 1834, 352 pages.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Asphyxia". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE