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Trench mouth



This article is about the physiological disorder. For the similarly-named band, see Trenchmouth.
Trench mouth
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 A69.1
ICD-9 101
DiseasesDB 13866
MeSH D005892

Trench mouth is a polymicrobial infection of the gums leading to inflammation, bleeding, deep ulceration and necrotic gum tissue; there may also be fever.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Terminology

It is also known as "Vincent's stomatitis", "Vincent's angina", or "acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis" (ANUG).

The common name was probably coined during World War I when many soldiers suffered from the condition. There are a number of other theories to the origin of the name. Vincent's angina was named after French physician Jean Hyacinthe Vincent (1862-1950).

Causes

Causative organisms include anaerobes such as Bacteroides and Fusobacterium as well as spirochetes (Borrelia and Treponema spp.).

The condition is caused by an overpopulation of established mouth bacteria due to a number of interacting factors such as poor hygiene, poor diet, smoking, other infections.

Treatment

Treatment is by the simple reduction of the bacteria through improved oral cleaning and salt water or hydrogen peroxide-based rinses. Chlorhexidine or metronidazole can also be used in addition.

Prognosis

Untreated, the infection may lead to rapid destruction of the periodontium and can spread, as necrotizing stomatitis, into neighbouring tissues in the cheeks, lips or the bones of the jaw. The condition can occur and be especially dangerous in people with weakened immune systems.

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Trench_mouth". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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