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Group A streptococcal infection



Streptococcus, group A, as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 B95.0

The group A streptococcus bacterium (Streptococcus pyogenes, or GAS) is a form of Streptococcus bacteria responsible for most cases of streptococcal illness. Other types (B, C, D, and G) may also cause infection. Several virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis of GAS, such as M protein, hemolysins, and extracellular enzymes. For further explanation of these virulence factors, see the main article on Streptococcus pyogenes.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Severe streptococcal infections

Some strains of group A streptococci (GAS) cause severe infection. Those at greatest risk include children with chickenpox; persons with suppressed immune systems; burn victims; elderly persons with cellulitis, diabetes, blood vessel disease, or cancer; and persons taking steroid treatments or chemotherapy. Intravenous drug users also are at high risk. GAS is an important cause of puerperal fever world-wide, causing serious infection and, if not promptly diagnosed and treated, death in newly delivered mothers. Severe GAS disease may also occur in healthy persons with no known risk factors.

All severe GAS infections may lead to shock, multisystem organ failure, and death. Early recognition and treatment are critical. Diagnostic tests include blood counts and urinalysis as well as cultures of blood or fluid from a wound site. The antibiotic of choice is penicillin, to which GAS is particularly susceptible and has never been found to be resistant. Erythromycin and clindamycin are other treatment options, though resistance to these antibiotics exists.

Relation with OCD

In recent years, children with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) thought to be caused by an autoimmune response to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection (PANDAS) have been identified, although the hypothesis remains contentious. [1]

Types of infection

Infections are largely categorized by the location of infection:

(Note that some of these diseases can be caused by other infectious agents as well.)

Complications

Acute rheumatic fever

Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a complication of a strep throat caused by particular strains of GAS. Although common in developing countries, ARF is rare in the United States, with small isolated outbreaks reported only occasionally. It is most common among children between 5-15 years of age. A family history of ARF may predispose an individual to the disease. Symptoms typically occur 18 days after an untreated strep throat. An acute attack lasts approximately 3 months. The most common clinical finding is a migratory arthritis involving multiple joints. The most serious complication is carditis, or heart inflammation (rheumatic heart disease), as this may lead to chronic heart disease and disability or death years after an attack. Less common findings include bumps or nodules under the skin (usually over the spine or other bony areas) and a red expanding rash on the trunk and extremities that recurs over weeks to months. Because of the different ways ARF presents itself, the disease may be difficult to diagnose. A neurological disorder, chorea, can occur months after an initial attack, causing jerky involuntary movements, muscle weakness, slurred speech, and personality changes. Initial episodes of ARF as well as recurrences can be prevented by treatment with appropriate antibiotics.

Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis

Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) is an uncommon complication of either a strep throat or a streptococcal skin infection. Symptoms of PSGN develop within 10 days following a strep throat or 3 weeks following a GAS skin infection. PSGN involves inflammation of the kidney. Symptoms include pale skin, lethargy, loss of appetite, headache and dull back pain. Clinical findings may include dark-colored urine, swelling of different parts of the body (edema), and high blood pressure. Treatment of PSGN consists of supportive care.

References

  • The original text of this article is taken from the NIH Fact Sheet "Group A Streptococcal Infections", dated March 1999. As a work of the U.S. Federal Government without any other copyright notice, this is assumed to be a public domain resource.
  • History of Treatment of OCD. Stanford School of Medicine. Retrieved on 2007-04-12
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Group_A_streptococcal_infection". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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