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Schmorl's nodes



Schmorl's nodes
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 M51.4
ICD-9 722.30
DiseasesDB 32386

Schmorl's nodes are protrusions of the cartilage of the intervertebral disc through the vertebral body endplate and into the adjacent vertebra. [1]

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Presentation

These are protrusions of disc material into the surface of the vertebral body. protrusions may contact the marrow of the vertebra, leading to inflammation. The protrusions are also associated with necrosis of the vertebral bone and the question of whether these protrusions and inflammation cause the necrosis, or whether the cartilage migrates into areas that have become necrotic due to other conditions, is under investigation.

They may or may not be symptomatic, and their etiological significance for back pain is controversial.

Diagnosis

Schmorl's nodes can be detected radiographically, although they can be imaged better by CT or MRI.

Causes

It is believed that Schmorl's nodes develop following back trauma, although this is incompletely understood.

Other reports indicate someone can be born with Schmorl's nodes.

Incidence/prevalence

Schmorl's nodes are found in 40 - 75% of autopsies.

Eponym

Schmorl's nodes are named for German pathologist Christian Georg Schmorl (1861-1932)[2].

References

  1. ^ synd/2377 at Who Named It
  2. ^ http://www.medfriendly.com/schmorlsnodule.html
  • McFadden KD, Taylor JR (1989). "End-plate lesions of the lumbar spine". Spine 14 (8): 867-9. PMID 2781398.
  • Peng B, Wu W, Hou S, Shang W, Wang X, Yang Y (2003). "The pathogenesis of Schmorl's nodes". The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume 85 (6): 879-82. PMID 12931811.
  • Takahashi K, Miyazaki T, Ohnari H, Takino T, Tomita K (1995). "Schmorl's nodes and low-back pain. Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging findings in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals". European spine journal 4 (1): 56-9. PMID 7749909.


 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Schmorl's_nodes". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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