14-Aug-2019 - CureVac AG

CureVac Enters into an Exclusive Collaborative Research Agreement with Yale University

CureVac AG announced it has entered into a Collaborative Research Agreement (“CRA”) with Yale University for discovery research into mRNA-based pulmonary therapeutic candidates. 

The exclusive CRA covers the development of an undisclosed number of novel mRNA-based candidates for pulmonary diseases.  Under terms of the CRA, the Yale University team, led by Geoff Chupp, MD, will perform discovery research on targets related to pulmonary diseases and present therapeutic candidates to CureVac for preclinical and subsequent clinical development.  CureVac will provide all funding for the discovery research and retains the option to acquire any rights regarding the candidates.

“We’re delighted to have the opportunity to partner with CureVac to work on what we hope will be the next generation of therapeutics for patients with severe respiratory disease,” said John Puziss, PhD, the Director of Business Development in Yale’s Office of Cooperative Research. 

Dr. Chupp added, “mRNA therapeutics are at the forefront of drug development and CureVac is a leader in the field.  We are very excited about the opportunity to merge our expertise in genomics of lung disease with CureVac’s expertise in mRNA therapeutic development to develop novel therapeutics for lung disease.  We look forward to a fruitful collaboration.”

“We are honored to partner with the Yale team, which is performing cutting edge discovery research in the pulmonary field,” said Dan Menichella, CEO of CureVac. “CureVac’s next generation mRNA delivery vehicle, the CureVac Carrier Molecule™ (CVCM™), can reach targets in the lung and other organs and is well suited for repeated administration.  We look forward to uncovering potential new therapeutic candidates with Yale University to help provide solutions to those with the greatest medical need.”

Facts, background information, dossiers
More about CureVac
More about Yale University
  • News

    Humans transport dangerous smoke residues indoors

    Decades of research have demonstrated the adverse effects of fine particulate matter and volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as nicotine or acetonitrile from tobacco smoke on human health, with no “safe” level of exposure. Smoking restrictions have decreased non-smokers’ exposure to secon ... more

    How fatal biofilms form

    By severely curtailing the effects of antibiotics, the formation of organized communities of bacterial cells known as biofilms can be deadly during surgeries and in urinary tract infections. Yale researchers have just come a lot closer to understanding how these biofilms develop, and potent ... more

    Seeing how cells work as never before

    Yale is adding microscopy that provides an unprecedented view of specimens whose thickness had thwarted close inspection Biological structures exist and function in three dimensions, but the limitations of imaging technology have long meant that scientists could examine only two dimensions ... more