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Boil



Boil
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 L02.
ICD-9 680.9
DiseasesDB 29434
MeSH D005667

Boil or furuncle is a skin disease caused by the inflammation of hair follicles, thus resulting in the localized accumulation of pus and dead tissue. Individual boils can cluster together and form an interconnected network of boils called carbuncles. In severe cases, boils may develop to form abscesses.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Symptoms

The symptoms of boils are red, pus-filled lumps that are tender, warm, and/or painful. A yellow or white point at the center of the lump can be seen when the boil is ready to drain or discharge pus. In a severe infection, multiple boils may develop and the patient may experience fever and swollen lymph nodes. A recurring boil is called [chronic furunculosis].

In some people, itching may develop before the lumps begin to develop. Boils are most often found on the back, underarms, shoulders, face, lip, eyes, nose, thighs and buttocks, but may be found elsewhere. Boils on the ear tend to be more painful, and can create shooting pain in the entire area when touched.

Sometimes boils will emit an unpleasant smell, particularly when drained or when discharge is present, due to the presence of bacteria in the discharge.

Causes

Boils are generally caused by an infection of the hair follicles by Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis, a strain of bacterium that normally lives on the skin surface. It is thought that a tiny cut of the skin allows this bacterium to enter the follicles and cause an infection. This can happen during bathing or while using a razor.

People with immune system disorders, diabetes, poor hygiene or malnutrition (Vitamin A or E deficiency) are particularly susceptible to getting boils; however, they also occur in healthy, hygienic individuals, due to over scratching a particular area of the skin.

Hidradenitis suppurativa causes frequent boils and boils in the armpits can sometimes be caused by anti-perspirant deodorants.

The development of boils throughout the body is also a symptom of smallpox.

Treatments

Most boils run their course within 4 to 10 days. For most people, self-care by applying a warm compress or soaking the boil in warm water can help alleviate the pain and hasten draining of the pus (colloquially referred to as "bringing the boil to a head"). Once the boil drains, the area should be washed with antibacterial soap and bandaged well.

For recurring cases, sufferers may benefit from diet supplements of Vitamin A and E.[citation needed]

In moderate cases, BOIL EASE or DRAW OUT SALVE can be used when the boil has become large and painful and MIGHT need draining. It usually takes 3 days for the boil to become less painful and eventually shrink and disappear. Boil Ease or Draw Out Salve is available at any pharmacy such as CVS, Rite Aid, Eckard, etc in the FIRST AID section. Use this ointment as soon as you see or feel a new boil. Typical use is twice a day, morning and night, for 3-7 days. If the boil has not improved or worsens, a doctor's visit is necessary.

In serious cases, prescription oral antibiotics such as dicloxacillin (Dynapen) or cephalexin (Keflex), or topical antibiotics, are commonly used. For patients allergic to penicillin-based drugs, erythromycin (E-base, Erycin) may also be used.

However, some boils are caused by a super bug known as Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, or CA-MRSA. Bactrim or other sulfa drugs must be prescribed relatively soon after such a boil has started to form. MRSA tends to increase the speed of growth of the infection.

Magnesium sulfate paste applied to the affected area can prevent the growth of bacteria and reduce boils by absorbing pus and drying up the lesion.

Prognosis

For most cases, there are no serious complications and a full recovery is expected.

See also

hair loss: Alopecia areata (Alopecia totalis, Alopecia universalis, Ophiasis) - Androgenic alopecia - Telogen effluvium - Traction alopecia - Lichen planopilaris - Trichorrhexis nodosa

other follicular disorders: Hypertrichosis (Hirsutism) - Acne vulgaris - Rosacea (Perioral dermatitis, Rhinophyma) - follicular cysts (Epidermoid cyst, Sebaceous cyst, Steatocystoma multiplex) - Pseudofolliculitis barbae - Hidradenitis suppurativa

sweat disorders: eccrine (Miliaria, Anhidrosis) - apocrine (Body odor, Chromhidrosis, Fox-Fordyce disease)
Otherpigmentation (Vitiligo, Melasma, Freckle, Café au lait spot, Lentigo/Liver spot) - Seborrheic keratosis - Acanthosis nigricans - Callus - Pyoderma gangrenosum - Bedsore - Keloid - Granuloma annulare - Necrobiosis lipoidica - Granuloma faciale - Lupus erythematosus - Morphea - Calcinosis cutis - Sclerodactyly - Ainhum - Livedoid vasculitis
see also congenital (Q80-Q84, 757)
  This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Boil". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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