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Body odor



Bromhidrosis
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 L75.0
ICD-9 705.89

Bromhidrosis or body odor (also called bromidrosis, osmidrosis and ozochrotia) is the smell of bacteria growing on the body. These bacteria multiply considerably in the presence of sweat, but sweat itself is almost totally odorless. Body odor is associated with the hair, feet, groin (upper medial thigh), anus, skin in general, armpits, genitals, pubic hair, and mouth.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Specificity

Body odor can smell pleasant and specific to the individual, and can be used to identify people, though this is more often done by dogs than by humans. An individual's body odor is also influenced by diet, gender, genetics, health, medication, and mood.[citation needed]

Genetics

Body odor is largely influenced by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. These are genetically determined and play an important role in immunity of the organism. The vomeronasal organ contains cells sensitive to MHC molecules in a genotype-specific way. Experiments on animals and volunteers shown the potential sexual partners tend to be perceived more attractive if their MHC composition is substantially different. This behavior pattern promotes variability of the immune system of individuals in the population, thus making the population more robust against new diseases.

A recent study suggests that body odor is genetically determined by a gene that also codes the type of earwax one has.[1][2] East Asians evidently have a greater chance of having the 'dry' earwax type and reduced axial sweating and odor. This may be due to adaptation to colder climates.

Cultural Preferences

Body odor can be prevented by using deodorants but although body odor is commonly associated with hygiene, its presentation can be affected by changes in diet.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Japanese Scientists Identify Ear Wax Gene - New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  2. ^ A SNP in the ABCC11 gene is the determinant of human earwax type - Nature Genetics. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  3. ^ Learn How to Fight Body Odor. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.

hair loss: Alopecia areata (Alopecia totalis, Alopecia universalis, Ophiasis) - Androgenic alopecia - Telogen effluvium - Traction alopecia - Lichen planopilaris - Trichorrhexis nodosa

other follicular disorders: Hypertrichosis (Hirsutism) - Acne vulgaris - Rosacea (Perioral dermatitis, Rhinophyma) - follicular cysts (Epidermoid cyst, Sebaceous cyst, Steatocystoma multiplex) - Pseudofolliculitis barbae - Hidradenitis suppurativa

sweat disorders: eccrine (Miliaria, Anhidrosis) - apocrine (Body odor, Chromhidrosis, Fox-Fordyce disease)
Otherpigmentation (Vitiligo, Melasma, Freckle, Café au lait spot, Lentigo/Liver spot) - Seborrheic keratosis - Acanthosis nigricans - Callus - Pyoderma gangrenosum - Bedsore - Keloid - Granuloma annulare - Necrobiosis lipoidica - Granuloma faciale - Lupus erythematosus - Morphea - Calcinosis cutis - Sclerodactyly - Ainhum - Livedoid vasculitis
see also congenital (Q80-Q84, 757)
  This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Body_odor". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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