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Antiandrogen



An antiandrogen, or androgen antagonist, is any of a group of hormone receptor antagonist compounds that are capable of preventing or inhibiting the biologic effects of androgens, male sex hormones, on normally responsive tissues in the body (see androgen insensitivity syndrome). Antiandrogens usually work by blocking the appropriate receptors, competing for binding sites on the cell's surface, obstructing the androgens' pathway.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Indications

Antiandrogens are often indicated to treat severe male sexual disorders, such as hypersexuality (excessive sexual desire) and sexual deviation, specifically paraphilias, as well as use as an antineoplastic agent and palliative, adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in prostate cancer.

Antiandrogens can also be used for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (prostate enlargement), acne vulgaris, androgenetic alopecia (male pattern baldness), and hirsutism (excessive hairiness). They are also occasionally used as a male contraceptive agent, to purposefully prevent or counteract masculinisation in the case of transwomen undergoing sex reassignment therapy, and to prevent the symptoms associated with reduced testosterone, such as hot flashes, following castration.

The administration of antiandrogens in males can result in slowed or halted development or reversal of male secondary sex characteristics, reduced activity or function of the accessory male sex organs, and hyposexuality (diminished sexual desire or libido).

Examples

Currently available antiandrogen drugs (brand names in parentheses) include:

Antiandrogen withdrawal response

The term antiandrogen withdrawal response (AAWR) describes the medical course taken when cancer cells adapt to feed on the antiandrogens rather than androgen, so that treatment must be halted in order to starve those cells thriving on the antiandrogens.

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Antiandrogen". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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