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FDA Grants Approval for avelumab

First Immunotherapy Approved for Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Merck and Pfizer Inc. announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved BAVENCIO® (avelumab) Injection 20 mg/mL, for intravenous use, for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (mMCC). This indication is ap ... more

Cracking the code of Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients to lose their ability to move, speak, and even think. It is caused by a gene mutation that produces an abnormal form of the protein huntingtin, which aggregates and builds up inside neurons of the cortex and striatum. ... more

Blocking neuroblastoma cell growth

An inhibitor of cell metabolism may be a good therapeutic target for neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma – a cancer that starts in nerve tissue outside of the brain – is the third most common cancer in children and accounts for about 15 percent of pediatric cancer-related deaths. MYC proteins drive neuroblastoma tumorigenesis in part by promoting the expression of key glycolytic ... more

ATP hydrolysis energy explained through large-scale hybrid quantum/classical simulations

In ATP hydrolysis, water is used to split apart adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to create adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to get energy. ATP hydrolysis energy (AHE) is then used in the activities of living cells. Many attempts have been made to explain the molecular origin of AHE. In the 1960s, AH ... more

Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants

Even plants have to live on an energy budget. While they're known for converting solar energy into chemical energy in the form of sugars, plants have sophisticated biochemical mechanisms for regulating how they spend that energy. Making oils costs a lot. By exploring the details of this del ... more

How do metals interact with DNA?

To fight cancer, every year thousands of chemical substances are screened for their potential effects on tumor cells. Once a compound able to inhibit cancer cell growth is found, it still takes several years of research until the drug gets approved and can be applied to patients. The elucid ... more

Scientists identify brain circuit that drives pleasure-inducing behavior

Surprisingly, the neurons are located in a brain region thought to be linked with fear

Scientists have long believed that the central amygdala, a structure located deep within the brain, is linked with fear and responses to unpleasant events. However, a team of MIT neuroscientists has now discovered a circuit in this structure that responds to rewarding events. In a study of ... more

Quantum dots illuminate transport within the cell

The quantum dots used by the researchers are particles of semi-conducting material just a few nanometres wide, and are the subject of great interest because of their potential for use in photovoltaic cells or computers. "The great thing about these particles is that they absorb light and em ... more

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light

While more research is needed to confirm the findings the use of FITR could herald a fast and easy way to spot early signs of infection, cancer, and difficult to diagnose neurological conditions. The research led by Professors Peter Lay and Georges Grau used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR ... more

New medicine to prevent mothers dying in childbirth succeeds in first trial in humans

The Monash University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MIPS) today announced positive results from a first-in-human study of a new, inhaled form of a medicine that could significantly reduce maternal deaths around the world. The results open the possibility of a streamlined pathway to ... more

All news

Cracking the code of Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients to lose their ability to move, speak, and even think. It is caused by a gene mutation that produces an abnormal form of the protein huntingtin, which aggregates and builds up inside neurons of the cortex and striatum. ... more

Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants

Even plants have to live on an energy budget. While they're known for converting solar energy into chemical energy in the form of sugars, plants have sophisticated biochemical mechanisms for regulating how they spend that energy. Making oils costs a lot. By exploring the details of this del ... more

Novel nozzle saves crystals

Double flow concept widens spectrum for protein crystallography

Thanks to an innovative nozzle, scientists can now analyse more types of proteins while using fewer of the hard-to-get protein crystals. The nozzle can reduce protein consumption eightfold in serial X-ray crystallography experiments, as the team of inventors, headed by DESY scientist Saša B ... more

Researchers develop groundbreaking process for creating ultra-selective separation membranes

A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has developed a groundbreaking one-step, crystal growth process for making ultra-thin layers of material with molecular-sized pores. Researchers demonstrated the use of the material, called zeolite nanosheets, by making ultra-select ... more

Agilent Technologies Board of Directors elects Koh Boon Hwee as new chairman

Agilent Technologies Inc. announced that Koh Boon Hwee has been elected chairman of the board, effective at the end of today’s shareholders’ meeting. Koh, who has been a member of Agilent’s board since 2003, replaces James G. Cullen, who served as chairman since 2005 and will continue as a ... more

When proteins court each other, the dance moves matter

At every moment inside the human body, a carefully choreographed dance is being performed. Proteins shake their bodies and wave their limbs, all with the goal of optimizing their interaction with other molecules, including other proteins. These tiny motions, called vibrations, enable the mo ... more

Atomic map of malaria drug gives it new life

Researchers have mapped how the malaria drug mefloquine works, providing a route to make effective alternatives and combat rising drug resistance. Malaria is caused by a family of parasites carried by certain mosquito species, leading to an estimated half a million deaths each year. There a ... more

Transport proteins suprisingly evolved long before their compounds emerged

As in an arms race plants constantly develop new toxic compounds to protect themselves against herbivores and diseases - and as in war, mobility is important. Therefore, plants evolved transport proteins to efficiently and timely concentrate toxic defense compounds where they are needed the ... more

Images of pathogens’ tiny ‘syringes’ captured

Salmonella and many other bacterial pathogens use a nano syringe-like device to deliver toxic proteins into target human cells. Now scientists at Yale and University of Texas Medical School-Houston have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal the molecular structure of this device, which is ... more

Analytik Jena enters Ultra-High Throughput Market

Access provided by Co-Marketing agreement with Illumina

Analytik Jena has entered a partnership with Illumina, Inc. headquartered in San Diego. In so doing Analytik Jena gains access to the growing genotyping market currently being served by Illumina’s technologies by offering a production scale solution to provide ultra-high throughput sample p ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Cracking the code of Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients to lose their ability to move, speak, and even think. It is caused by a gene mutation that produces an abnormal form of the protein huntingtin, which aggregates and builds up inside neurons of the cortex and striatum. ... more

Blocking neuroblastoma cell growth

An inhibitor of cell metabolism may be a good therapeutic target for neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma – a cancer that starts in nerve tissue outside of the brain – is the third most common cancer in children and accounts for about 15 percent of pediatric cancer-related deaths. MYC proteins drive neuroblastoma tumorigenesis in part by promoting the expression of key glycolytic ... more

Study IDs link between sugar signaling and regulation of oil production in plants

Even plants have to live on an energy budget. While they're known for converting solar energy into chemical energy in the form of sugars, plants have sophisticated biochemical mechanisms for regulating how they spend that energy. Making oils costs a lot. By exploring the details of this del ... more

Quantum dots illuminate transport within the cell

The quantum dots used by the researchers are particles of semi-conducting material just a few nanometres wide, and are the subject of great interest because of their potential for use in photovoltaic cells or computers. "The great thing about these particles is that they absorb light and em ... more

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light

While more research is needed to confirm the findings the use of FITR could herald a fast and easy way to spot early signs of infection, cancer, and difficult to diagnose neurological conditions. The research led by Professors Peter Lay and Georges Grau used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR ... more

Tethered nanoparticles make tumor cells more vulnerable

MIT researchers have devised a way to make tumor cells more susceptible to certain types of cancer treatment by coating the cells with nanoparticles before delivering drugs. By tethering hundreds of tiny particles to the surfaces of tumor cells in the presence of a mechanical force, the res ... more

Molecular motor-powered biocomputers

Crashing computers or smartphones and software security holes that allow hackers to steal millions of passwords could be prevented if it were possible to design and verify error-free software. Unfortunately, to date, this is a problem that neither engineers nor supercomputers can solve. One ... more

ACHEMA 2018: Preparations moving into high gear

There is still over a year to go before ACHEMA 2018 opens, nevertheless preparations are moving into high gear: more than 2,400 companies have already ordered a stand; by the time the halls open on 11 June 2018 the organisers expect the exhibitor figure to top the 3,800 mark, all set to pre ... more

Siegfried: Management Changes

Siegfried Group (Zofingen) has announced two management changes. Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Michael Hüsler will be leaving the company at the end of April 2017 to take up a new professional challenge. Michael Hüsler has been CFO and a member of the firm’s Executive Committee since 2009. ... more

Computer simulation of protein synthesis reveals high complexity of cell machinery

Life depends on proteins. These molecules are produced continually in our cells, which act as microscopic production lines - but the process is so complex we have barely begun to understand it. Exploring protein synthesis may, however, be the key to revealing how the body controls the thous ... more

All news on biotechnology

Cracking the code of Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients to lose their ability to move, speak, and even think. It is caused by a gene mutation that produces an abnormal form of the protein huntingtin, which aggregates and builds up inside neurons of the cortex and striatum. ... more

Quantum dots illuminate transport within the cell

The quantum dots used by the researchers are particles of semi-conducting material just a few nanometres wide, and are the subject of great interest because of their potential for use in photovoltaic cells or computers. "The great thing about these particles is that they absorb light and em ... more

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light

While more research is needed to confirm the findings the use of FITR could herald a fast and easy way to spot early signs of infection, cancer, and difficult to diagnose neurological conditions. The research led by Professors Peter Lay and Georges Grau used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR ... more

Analysis method of metabolites accurately predicts whether a child has autism

Scientists have developed a new, highly accurate method that analyzes metabolic biomarkers to assess whether a child is on the autism spectrum. Autism spectrum disorder affects about 1.5 percent of all children, but its exact cause remains unknown, and diagnosis requires a multidisciplinary ... more

Detecting blood clot risk using biomarkers

Cancer is one of the hardest medical conditions to overcome, and for those who do so, the battle often does not stop at remission. Many cancers predispose patients to develop blood clots, particularly patients who are diagnosed at a late stage, which often complicates their treatment and re ... more

New driver, target in advanced mucosal melanoma

Not all melanomas are created equal. While most melanomas appear on the skin as the result of sun exposure, a small subset of melanomas arise spontaneously from mucosal tissues. And while targeted treatments and immunotherapies have dramatically improved the prognosis for many patients with ... more

Agilent Technologies Board of Directors elects Koh Boon Hwee as new chairman

Agilent Technologies Inc. announced that Koh Boon Hwee has been elected chairman of the board, effective at the end of today’s shareholders’ meeting. Koh, who has been a member of Agilent’s board since 2003, replaces James G. Cullen, who served as chairman since 2005 and will continue as a ... more

How to amplify or stifle signals for immune responses

T cells, the managers of our immune systems, spend their days shaking hands with another type of cell that presents small pieces of protein from pathogens or cancerous cells to the T cell. But each T cell is programmed to recognize just a few protein pieces, known as antigens, meaning years ... more

Breakthrough discovery may make blood test feasible for detecting cancer

Doctors may soon be able to detect and monitor a patient’s cancer with a simple blood test, reducing or eliminating the need for more invasive procedures, according to Purdue University research. W. Andy Tao, a professor of biochemistry and member of the Purdue University Center for Cancer ... more

Precise technique tracks dopamine in the brain

MIT researchers have devised a way to measure dopamine in the brain much more precisely than previously possible, which should allow scientists to gain insight into dopamine's roles in learning, memory, and emotion. Dopamine is one of the many neurotransmitters that neurons in the brain use ... more

All news on diagnostics

DURAN Group, WHEATON, and Kimble Unite to Form New Brand

Global Provider of Laboratory Glassware for the Life Sciences Industry

DURAN GROUP announced that following acquisition of WHEATON Industries and subsequent merger with a Kimble Chase, have now successfully achieved the integration of these three industry-leading brands into a single, unified international brand, DURAN WHEATON KIMBLE. The creation of this stro ... more

Agilent Technologies Board of Directors elects Koh Boon Hwee as new chairman

Agilent Technologies Inc. announced that Koh Boon Hwee has been elected chairman of the board, effective at the end of today’s shareholders’ meeting. Koh, who has been a member of Agilent’s board since 2003, replaces James G. Cullen, who served as chairman since 2005 and will continue as a ... more

Analytik Jena enters Ultra-High Throughput Market

Access provided by Co-Marketing agreement with Illumina

Analytik Jena has entered a partnership with Illumina, Inc. headquartered in San Diego. In so doing Analytik Jena gains access to the growing genotyping market currently being served by Illumina’s technologies by offering a production scale solution to provide ultra-high throughput sample p ... more

Drugs could be developed cheaper and faster

Chemists at the University of Waterloo, SCIEX and Pfizer have discovered a new way to help the pharmaceutical industry identify and test new drugs, which could revolutionize drug development, and substantially reduce the cost and time drugs need to reach their market. The study, published i ... more

analytica Vietnam 2017: More exhibitors and a strong supporting program

analytica Vietnam is being held for the fifth time this year, and interest among companies is stronger than ever. Compared to the last time the fair was held (2015), approximately 15 percent more exhibitors are expected. Exhibition space is up by the same amount. Besides the product highlig ... more

Resolutions of the Sartorius Supervisory Board

Rainer Lehmann appointed to the Executive Board

The Supervisory Board of Sartorius AG approved the Executive Board’s recommendation to submit a proposal to the Annual Shareholders’ Meeting on April 6, 2017, to raise dividends to 0.46 euros per preference share and to 0.45 per ordinary share. Prior-year dividends, adjusted by the stock sp ... more

Manufacturers in the laboratory sector choose analytica

Large number of exhibitors registered more than a year before analytica

More than a year before the fair, this much is certain: analytica 2018 is very popular among exhibitors. Some 14 months before the next exhibition is set to begin, more than 230 companies have already registered to participate in the International Trade Fair for Laboratory Technology, Analy ... more

Sartorius Grows by Double Digits

Number of employees grows by around 12% to more than 6,900

Sartorius grew dynamically in both divisions in fiscal 2016 according to its preliminary figures and achieved its financial targets raised at mid-year. "The year 2016 was highly successful for Sartorius, both operationally and strategically," commented CEO Dr. Joachim Kreuzburg. "Our Biopro ... more

Waters Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2016 Financial Results

Asia Pacific and Europe led strong global growth

Waters Corporation reported fourth quarter 2016 sales of $629 million, a 7% increase versus sales of $587 million in the fourth quarter of 2015. Foreign currency translation reduced sales growth by 2% in the quarter. On a GAAP basis, earnings per diluted share (EPS) for the fourth quarter w ... more

WALDNER Laboreinrichtungen extends Management Board

Joerg Hoffmann has been appointed to the management board of WALDNER Laboreinrichtungen GmbH & Co. KG just over 100 days ago. Together with Horst Schierholz he is responsible for the corporation and will provide new impetus regarding international sales. “We have to position ourselves in a ... more

All news on lab technology

FDA Grants Approval for avelumab

First Immunotherapy Approved for Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Merck and Pfizer Inc. announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved BAVENCIO® (avelumab) Injection 20 mg/mL, for intravenous use, for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (mMCC). This indication is ap ... more

New medicine to prevent mothers dying in childbirth succeeds in first trial in humans

The Monash University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MIPS) today announced positive results from a first-in-human study of a new, inhaled form of a medicine that could significantly reduce maternal deaths around the world. The results open the possibility of a streamlined pathway to ... more

Tethered nanoparticles make tumor cells more vulnerable

MIT researchers have devised a way to make tumor cells more susceptible to certain types of cancer treatment by coating the cells with nanoparticles before delivering drugs. By tethering hundreds of tiny particles to the surfaces of tumor cells in the presence of a mechanical force, the res ... more

Nanocages for gold particles: What is happening inside?

In living organisms, free metal ions are stored and transported through proteins assembled into highly ordered structures such as protein cages via a reaction called biomineralization. This sophisticated biological strategy has attracted the attention of biotechnologists who speculate that ... more

Researchers develop groundbreaking process for creating ultra-selective separation membranes

A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has developed a groundbreaking one-step, crystal growth process for making ultra-thin layers of material with molecular-sized pores. Researchers demonstrated the use of the material, called zeolite nanosheets, by making ultra-select ... more

Antibody fights pediatric brain tumors in preclinical testing

Five types of pediatric brain cancer were safely and effectively treated in mice by an antibody that causes immune cells to engulf and eat tumors without hurting healthy brain cells, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The immune therapy st ... more

New method for producing leading anti-malarial drug

Researchers at Cardiff University have devised a new way of creating a drug commonly used as the first line of defence against malaria around the world. Artemisinin is a drug recommended by the World Health Organisation for treatment of all cases of severe malaria and works by attacking all ... more

Gerresheimer modernizing its Pfreimd site

Company switching to a more powerful, more energy-efficient technology

Gerresheimer is sparing little expense in bringing cutting-edge technology to the buildings at its German production site in Pfreimd. The first phase of the construction process – renovating the whole of the clean room in Hall 2 – has just been completed, with Halls 1 and 3 to follow. This ... more

How to brew high-value fatty acids with brewer's yeast

Short-chain fatty acids are high-value constituents of cosmetics, active pharmaceutical ingredients, antimicrobial substances, aromas or soap. To date, it has only been possible to extract them from crude oil by chemical means or from certain plants, such as coconut, using a complex process ... more

Atomic map of malaria drug gives it new life

Researchers have mapped how the malaria drug mefloquine works, providing a route to make effective alternatives and combat rising drug resistance. Malaria is caused by a family of parasites carried by certain mosquito species, leading to an estimated half a million deaths each year. There a ... more

All news on pharma

Blocking neuroblastoma cell growth

An inhibitor of cell metabolism may be a good therapeutic target for neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma – a cancer that starts in nerve tissue outside of the brain – is the third most common cancer in children and accounts for about 15 percent of pediatric cancer-related deaths. MYC proteins drive neuroblastoma tumorigenesis in part by promoting the expression of key glycolytic ... more

How do metals interact with DNA?

To fight cancer, every year thousands of chemical substances are screened for their potential effects on tumor cells. Once a compound able to inhibit cancer cell growth is found, it still takes several years of research until the drug gets approved and can be applied to patients. The elucid ... more

Scientists identify brain circuit that drives pleasure-inducing behavior

Surprisingly, the neurons are located in a brain region thought to be linked with fear

Scientists have long believed that the central amygdala, a structure located deep within the brain, is linked with fear and responses to unpleasant events. However, a team of MIT neuroscientists has now discovered a circuit in this structure that responds to rewarding events. In a study of ... more

Quantum dots illuminate transport within the cell

The quantum dots used by the researchers are particles of semi-conducting material just a few nanometres wide, and are the subject of great interest because of their potential for use in photovoltaic cells or computers. "The great thing about these particles is that they absorb light and em ... more

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light

While more research is needed to confirm the findings the use of FITR could herald a fast and easy way to spot early signs of infection, cancer, and difficult to diagnose neurological conditions. The research led by Professors Peter Lay and Georges Grau used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR ... more

New medicine to prevent mothers dying in childbirth succeeds in first trial in humans

The Monash University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MIPS) today announced positive results from a first-in-human study of a new, inhaled form of a medicine that could significantly reduce maternal deaths around the world. The results open the possibility of a streamlined pathway to ... more

Tethered nanoparticles make tumor cells more vulnerable

MIT researchers have devised a way to make tumor cells more susceptible to certain types of cancer treatment by coating the cells with nanoparticles before delivering drugs. By tethering hundreds of tiny particles to the surfaces of tumor cells in the presence of a mechanical force, the res ... more

Testing the Efficacy of New Gene Therapies More Efficiently

Using a new cellular model, innovative gene therapy approaches for the hereditary immunodeficiency Chronic Granulomatous Disease can be tested more rapidly and more cost-effectively in the lab for their efficacy. A team of researchers from the University of Zurich and the Children’s Hospita ... more

Researchers decipher how the body controls stem cells

Stem cells are unspecialised cells that can develop into any type of cell in the human body. So far, however, scientists only partially understand how the body controls the fate of these all-rounders, and what factors decide whether a stem cell will differentiate, for example, into a blood, ... more

Block Copolymer Micellization as a Protection Strategy for DNA Origami

Scientists from the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden / TU Dresden and the University of Tokyo led by Dr. Thorsten-Lars Schmidt (cfaed) developed a method to protect DNA origami structures from decomposition in biological media. This protection enables future applications in nanomedi ... more

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