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Cleanroom on demand

“Clean Multipurpose Cover” is the world’s first flexible cleanroom system The smallest degree of contamination can lead to major quality issues across many industries. Should, for example, any impurities occur on microchips, space probes and lenses, this can lead to defects or faulty end d ... more

Bringing artificial enzymes closer to nature

Scientists at the University of Basel, ETH Zurich in Basel, and NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering have developed an artificial metalloenzyme that catalyses a reaction inside of cells without equivalent in nature. This could be a prime example for creating new non-natural metabolic pathways ... more

A new animal model to understand metastasis in sarcomas

The Sarcoma research group of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, has developed a modified version of an orthotopic model that allows researchers to recreate more closely the metastatic steps in Ewing sarcoma (ES), the second most common bone ... more

New hope for Zika treatment found in large-scale screen of existing drugs

Scientists report that a specialized drug screen test using lab-grown human cells has revealed two classes of compounds already in the pharmaceutical arsenal that may work against mosquito-borne Zika virus infections. In a summary of their work the investigators say they screened 6,000 exis ... more

Viral-based therapy for bone cancer

Scientists at Okayama University develop a viral-based technique specific to bone cancer that enhances patients’ sensitivity to chemotherapy. Certain cancers, including osteosarcoma (bone cancer), are unresponsive to chemotherapy, making disease prognosis very poor. Osteosarcoma is a rare b ... more

BMG LABTECH invests 4.5 million Euro in headquarters site expansion

Microplate reader manufacturer doubles its production area

BMG LABTECH has recorded a rapid increase in revenue over the past years. A new company building provides the additional capacity required for the company's anticipated business growth over the longer term. The expansion is a necessary response to the global demand for BMG LABTECH products ... more

The brain performs feats of math to make sense of the world

Even if we find it difficult to calculate complicated probabilities on the spot, our brains constantly carry out these sorts of computations without our awareness -- and they're remarkably good at it. Princeton University researchers show in a new study how our brains combine complicated ob ... more

Parkinson's study could pave way for early detection test

A test that can detect Parkinson's disease in the early stages of the illness has moved a step closer. Scientists have developed a way of detecting a molecule linked to the condition in samples of spinal fluid from patients. Experts say that the test needs to be validated with a larger samp ... more

Nebivolol prevents anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity

Nebivolol prevents anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 by Professor Mirela Cleopatra Tomescu, a cardiologist at Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.1 "Breast cancer is a major public health problem world ... more

Strategic partnership for the development of next generation natural sweeteners

The BRAIN AG, AnalytiCon Discovery GmbH and Roquette announced a strategic partnership under the form of a consortium by the name DOLCE. Within this strategic partnership, the partners will jointly develop natural sweeteners and sweet taste enhancers with the goal to achieve sugar- and calo ... more

All news

BMG LABTECH invests 4.5 million Euro in headquarters site expansion

Microplate reader manufacturer doubles its production area

BMG LABTECH has recorded a rapid increase in revenue over the past years. A new company building provides the additional capacity required for the company's anticipated business growth over the longer term. The expansion is a necessary response to the global demand for BMG LABTECH products ... more

Hitching a ride: misfiring drugs hit the wrong targets

It probably isn't surprising to read that pharmaceutical drugs don't always do what they're supposed to. Adverse side effects are a well-known phenomenon and something many of us will have experienced when taking medicines. Sometimes, these side effects can be caused when a drug hits the wr ... more

Finding new targets to treat vascular damage

Diabetes heightens the risk of vascular damage to heart and limbs, and impairs the ability to repair damage with new growth of blood vessels, called angiogenesis. There are no established drugs to improve angiogenesis in diabetes. However, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have iden ... more

New insights into human genetic variation revealed

Research led by Dr Monkol Lek of the University of Sydney and Dr Daniel MacArthur of The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard Universities reveals patterns of genetic variation worldwide by sequencing the exomes of 60,706 individuals with diverse geographic ancestries, including European, Afr ... more

New mechanism discovered for Alzheimer's risk gene

For decades, scientists have known that people with two copies of a gene called apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) are much more likely to have Alzheimer's disease at age 65 than the rest of the population. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have identified a connection between ApoE4 and protein ... more

Stay out, stray stem cells

Despite the hubbub about pluripotent stem cells’ potential applications, when it comes time to introduce products into patients, the stem cells are actually impurities that need to be removed. That’s because this type of stem cell is capable of becoming teratomas – tumors — when transplante ... more

New approach doubles 3-D resolution of fluorescence microscopy

Researchers have developed a new fluorescence microscopy approach that significantly improves image resolution by acquiring three views of a sample at the same time. Their new method is particularly useful for watching the dynamics of biological processes, which can provide insights into ho ... more

Disregarded plant molecule actually a treasure

The best natural chemists out there are not scientists--they're plants. Plants have continued to evolve a rich palette of small natural chemicals and receptors since they began to inhabit land roughly 450 million years ago. Now, research by Salk Institute scientists reveals an unexpected ro ... more

Artificial skin tests for stopping sun damage

Sun rays damage unprotected skin. Substances in medications or lotions applied to the skin can be chemically modified by sun rays to have a toxic effect on the body. An accredited in-vitro test method at Fraunhofer IGB in Stuttgart measures the phototoxic potential of substances or cosmetic ... more

numares AG appoints Dr. Titus Kaletta as executive board member

The supervisory board of numares AG has appointed Dr. Titus Kaletta (47) as a member of the executive board effective July 1, 2016. His main responsibility will be to further develop sales throughout Europe and Asia. Kaletta holds a doctoral degree in biochemistry and worked for various int ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Viral-based therapy for bone cancer

Scientists at Okayama University develop a viral-based technique specific to bone cancer that enhances patients’ sensitivity to chemotherapy. Certain cancers, including osteosarcoma (bone cancer), are unresponsive to chemotherapy, making disease prognosis very poor. Osteosarcoma is a rare b ... more

Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube

DNA computers could one day be programmed to diagnose and treat disease

Often described as the blueprint of life, DNA contains the instructions for making every living thing from a human to a house fly. But in recent decades, some researchers have been putting the letters of the genetic code to a different use: making tiny nanoscale computers. In a new study, a ... more

Discovery in genetic research could lead to treatments for mitochondrial diseases

A new study from the University of Missouri has succeeded in creating embryos with "heteroplasmy," or the presence of both maternal and paternal mitochondrial DNA. This new innovation will allow scientists to study treatments for mitochondrial diseases in humans as well as the significance ... more

Natural mother of pearl structure, synthetic replication

Biomaterials play a crucial role in the development of future high-performance materials. A naturally occurring example of such biomaterial, the mollusk shell, guides chemical replication processes in laboratories. Due to its complex chemical construction, however, these processes are not e ... more

A new way to display the 3-D structure of molecules

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have created a sort of nanoscale display case that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples. Their work could help to reveal new structural d ... more

Stay out, stray stem cells

Despite the hubbub about pluripotent stem cells’ potential applications, when it comes time to introduce products into patients, the stem cells are actually impurities that need to be removed. That’s because this type of stem cell is capable of becoming teratomas – tumors — when transplante ... more

Down to the wire

ONR researchers and new bacteria

Scientists sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) have genetically modified a common soil bacteria to create electrical wires that not only conduct electricity, but are thousands of times thinner than a human hair. As electronic devices increasingly touch all facets of people's liv ... more

Legions of nanorobots target cancerous tumors with precision

Researchers from Polytechnique Montréal, Université de Montréal and McGill University have just achieved a spectacular breakthrough in cancer research. They have developed new nanorobotic agents capable of navigating through the bloodstream to administer a drug with precision by specificall ... more

Disregarded plant molecule actually a treasure

The best natural chemists out there are not scientists--they're plants. Plants have continued to evolve a rich palette of small natural chemicals and receptors since they began to inhabit land roughly 450 million years ago. Now, research by Salk Institute scientists reveals an unexpected ro ... more

The fourth state of matter, plasma: A technology to improve bone healing?

Cold plasma looks like the glow from the "Star Wars" blue light saber but this beam of energy, made of electrons that change polarity at micro-second or nanosecond speeds, could help bones heal faster, according to a study. Most people interact with plasma every day. It's in our TVs, fluore ... more

All news on biotechnology

A new animal model to understand metastasis in sarcomas

The Sarcoma research group of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, has developed a modified version of an orthotopic model that allows researchers to recreate more closely the metastatic steps in Ewing sarcoma (ES), the second most common bone ... more

Parkinson's study could pave way for early detection test

A test that can detect Parkinson's disease in the early stages of the illness has moved a step closer. Scientists have developed a way of detecting a molecule linked to the condition in samples of spinal fluid from patients. Experts say that the test needs to be validated with a larger samp ... more

Team discovers how Zika virus causes fetal brain damage

Infection by the Zika virus diverts a key protein necessary for neural cell division in the developing human fetus, thereby causing the birth defect microcephaly, a team of Yale scientists reported Aug. 24 in the journal Cell Reports. The findings suggest that Zika virus might be susceptibl ... more

New blood spot test used internationally in fight against HIV

Researchers at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at CU Anschutz have developed a technique that estimates an HIV-negative patient's adherence to drugs prescribed to prevent HIV transmission during sex. The test measures traces of antiretroviral drugs in a spot of dri ... more

Increased eye cancer risk linked to pigmentation genes that dictate eye color

New research links specific inherited genetic differences (alterations) to an increased risk for eye (uveal) melanoma, a rare form of melanoma that arises from pigment cells that determine eye color. Roughly 2,500 people are diagnosed with uveal melanoma in the United States annually. Previ ... more

New MRI technique sheds technology's longtime limits

A new technology harnesses imperfections that typically compromise MRI exams to create images resolved enough to enable consistent diagnoses across populations for the first time. These are findings of a study led by NYU Langone Medical Center. During a scan, antennas hit the atoms making u ... more

Biomarker breakthrough could improve Parkinson's treatment

A new, non-invasive way to track the progression of Parkinson's disease could help evaluate experimental treatments to slow or stop the disease's progression. University of Florida researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging to reveal areas where Parkinson's disease and related c ... more

New research sheds light on the role of proteins and how synapses work

Synapses are the power junctions that allow living creatures to function. Popularly associated with learning and memory, they play a more fundamental role in our existence by regulating everything from breathing, sleeping and waking and other bodily functions. Loss of synapses and synapse f ... more

New approach doubles 3-D resolution of fluorescence microscopy

Researchers have developed a new fluorescence microscopy approach that significantly improves image resolution by acquiring three views of a sample at the same time. Their new method is particularly useful for watching the dynamics of biological processes, which can provide insights into ho ... more

Anthrax, rabbit fever and brucellosis

How can the population be better protected from highly pathogenic bacteria in food?

Infectious diseases such as anthrax, tularaemia (rabbit fever) and brucellosis only occur rarely in Germany. However, these pathogens can do great harm if they are allowed, deliberately or by mistake, to enter the food chain. The reasons for such dissemination can be natural catastrophes su ... more

All news on diagnostics

A new way to display the 3-D structure of molecules

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have created a sort of nanoscale display case that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples. Their work could help to reveal new structural d ... more

Merck Lifts Forecast Following Good Second Quarter

Organic sales growth in all regions

Merck reported a significant increase in sales in the second quarter of 2016 in comparison with the year-earlier period. EBITDA pre exceptionals also rose sharply. Owing to good business performance in the second quarter, Merck lifted its forecast for sales and EBITDA pre exceptionals. "We ... more

Water-resistant thanks to a biofilm

Mortar with an added bacterial film is highly resistant to water uptake

Moisture can destroy mortar over time – for example when cracks form as a result of frost. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found an unusual way to protect mortar from moisture: When the material is being mixed, they add a biofilm – a soft, moist substanc ... more

BioTek Instruments embarks on major site expansion

BioTek Instruments celebrated the start of a $4 million, 22,000 square foot facility expansion during a company-wide event on Monday, July 18, featuring honorable guests Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy, Congressman Peter Welch, Governor Peter Shumlin, and Lt. Governor Phil Scott. The increase ... more

Company take-over of Slamed ING GmbH by Ratiolab GmbH

Company Ratiolab GmbH has taken over Slamed ING GmbH with effect on 05th July 2016. Ratiolab GmbH will continue the existing business activities without any change. In 1987 Slamed ING GmbH was founded in the city of Frankfurt, Germany by Mr. Eugen Gieldzik. After more than 30 years business ... more

Eppendorf AG: Change in Supervisory Board

Klaus Fink resigns as Chairman after five years

At the Annual General Meeting of June 3, 2016, Klaus Fink stepped down from his position as Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Eppendorf AG and resigned from the Board. Mr. Fink led and developed the company as Chief Executive Officer for 22 years before becoming Chairman of the Superviso ... more

Thermo Fisher Scientific to acquire FEI Company

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., and FEI Company announced that their boards of directors have unanimously approved Thermo Fisher’s acquisition of FEI for $107.50 per share in cash. The transaction represents a purchase price of approximately $4.2 billion. FEI designs, manufactures and suppor ... more

analytica 2016: Record number of exhibitors thanks to 6.5 percent increase

Several world premieres enthrall visitors

During the past four days (May 10 to 13), a total of 1,244 exhibitors from 40 countries presented their product innovations including a number of world premieres to some 35,000 visitors at analytica. There was a considerable increase it the share of exhibitors and visitors from abroad. As a ... more

RephiLe Appoints Peter Lucas as President, North America

RephiLe Bioscience Ltd. has appointed Peter Lucas as President-North America effective March 15, 2016. Mr. Lucas will be responsible for all North America operations for RephiLe.  Peter brings a wealth of experience, global leadership, and extensive market knowledge to RephiLe Bioscience.  ... more

analytica 2016: Key platform for upcoming scientists

analytica (at the Messe München trade-fair center from May 10–13) is more than just the most important platform for scientific experts and well-known equipment manufacturers in the laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology sectors. It is also the first place that future industry pro ... more

All news on lab technology

Cleanroom on demand

“Clean Multipurpose Cover” is the world’s first flexible cleanroom system The smallest degree of contamination can lead to major quality issues across many industries. Should, for example, any impurities occur on microchips, space probes and lenses, this can lead to defects or faulty end d ... more

New hope for Zika treatment found in large-scale screen of existing drugs

Scientists report that a specialized drug screen test using lab-grown human cells has revealed two classes of compounds already in the pharmaceutical arsenal that may work against mosquito-borne Zika virus infections. In a summary of their work the investigators say they screened 6,000 exis ... more

Viral-based therapy for bone cancer

Scientists at Okayama University develop a viral-based technique specific to bone cancer that enhances patients’ sensitivity to chemotherapy. Certain cancers, including osteosarcoma (bone cancer), are unresponsive to chemotherapy, making disease prognosis very poor. Osteosarcoma is a rare b ... more

Nebivolol prevents anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity

Nebivolol prevents anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 by Professor Mirela Cleopatra Tomescu, a cardiologist at Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.1 "Breast cancer is a major public health problem world ... more

BioInvent extends manufacturing services contract with major global pharmaceutical client

Expects to generate approximately SEK 8 million in revenue

BioInvent International announced that it has signed an extended contract for manufacturing services with one of its current customers, a major global pharmaceutical client. The extension covers services for one of the products in the pharmaceutical company’s development portfolio. Michael ... more

Hitching a ride: misfiring drugs hit the wrong targets

It probably isn't surprising to read that pharmaceutical drugs don't always do what they're supposed to. Adverse side effects are a well-known phenomenon and something many of us will have experienced when taking medicines. Sometimes, these side effects can be caused when a drug hits the wr ... more

Finding new targets to treat vascular damage

Diabetes heightens the risk of vascular damage to heart and limbs, and impairs the ability to repair damage with new growth of blood vessels, called angiogenesis. There are no established drugs to improve angiogenesis in diabetes. However, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have iden ... more

Simple polymer could unlock more effective bone regeneration treatments

A new technique developed by biomedical engineers could help to unlock the full potential of a promising treatment for bone regeneration, creating better therapies for spinal injuries, bone grafts and other orthopaedic surgeries.   Scientists from the University of Glasgow discuss how they ... more

Breakthrough in understanding the functionality of GPCRs

Integral Molecular announced a major advancement in understanding the functionality of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest protein superfamily in the human genome, providing unprecedented insight for human disease therapeutics. The work answers the fundamental question of how G ... more

Recipharm increases lyophilisation capacity in Italy

Recipharm has announced a €3.7 million investment to expand its lyophilisation capacity in Masate, Italy, in response to growing customer demand.   The investment forms part of Recipharm’s strategy to become a leading lyophilisation provider, and is in addition to the ongoing investment at ... more

All news on pharma

A new animal model to understand metastasis in sarcomas

The Sarcoma research group of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, has developed a modified version of an orthotopic model that allows researchers to recreate more closely the metastatic steps in Ewing sarcoma (ES), the second most common bone ... more

New hope for Zika treatment found in large-scale screen of existing drugs

Scientists report that a specialized drug screen test using lab-grown human cells has revealed two classes of compounds already in the pharmaceutical arsenal that may work against mosquito-borne Zika virus infections. In a summary of their work the investigators say they screened 6,000 exis ... more

Parkinson's study could pave way for early detection test

A test that can detect Parkinson's disease in the early stages of the illness has moved a step closer. Scientists have developed a way of detecting a molecule linked to the condition in samples of spinal fluid from patients. Experts say that the test needs to be validated with a larger samp ... more

Hitching a ride: misfiring drugs hit the wrong targets

It probably isn't surprising to read that pharmaceutical drugs don't always do what they're supposed to. Adverse side effects are a well-known phenomenon and something many of us will have experienced when taking medicines. Sometimes, these side effects can be caused when a drug hits the wr ... more

Basic research fuels advanced discovery

Clinical trials and translational medicine have certainly given people hope and rapid pathways to cures for some of mankind's most troublesome diseases, but now is not the time to overlook the power of basic research, says UC Santa Barbara neuroscientist Kenneth S. Kosik. In fact supporting ... more

Simple polymer could unlock more effective bone regeneration treatments

A new technique developed by biomedical engineers could help to unlock the full potential of a promising treatment for bone regeneration, creating better therapies for spinal injuries, bone grafts and other orthopaedic surgeries.   Scientists from the University of Glasgow discuss how they ... more

Breakthrough in understanding the functionality of GPCRs

Integral Molecular announced a major advancement in understanding the functionality of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest protein superfamily in the human genome, providing unprecedented insight for human disease therapeutics. The work answers the fundamental question of how G ... more

Study suggests new way to treat rare autism disorder

A protein that plays a powerful role in learning and memory may be a key to improving treatment of a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), a new study suggests. J. David Sweatt , Ph.D., the new chair of the Department of Pharmacology in the Vanderbilt University ... more

Unconventional natural gas wells associated with migraine, fatigue

New research suggests that Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms and severe fatig ... more

Team discovers how Zika virus causes fetal brain damage

Infection by the Zika virus diverts a key protein necessary for neural cell division in the developing human fetus, thereby causing the birth defect microcephaly, a team of Yale scientists reported Aug. 24 in the journal Cell Reports. The findings suggest that Zika virus might be susceptibl ... more

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