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A New Discovery in the Fight against Cancer

When medication is used to shut off the oxygen supply to tumor cells, the cells adapt their metabolism in the medium term – by switching over to producing energy without oxygen. This observation by biomedical scientists at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel could be used ... more

analytica 2016: Key platform for upcoming scientists

analytica (at the Messe München trade-fair center from May 10–13) is more than just the most important platform for scientific experts and well-known equipment manufacturers in the laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology sectors. It is also the first place that future industry pro ... more

Radiation and immunotherapy combination can destroy both primary and secondary tumors

Radiation therapy not only kills cancer cells, but also helps to activate the immune system against their future proliferation. However, this immune response is often not strong enough to be able to cure tumours, and even when it is, its effect is limited to the area that has been irradiate ... more

Breast milk linked to significant early brain growth in preemies

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. Studying preterm infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at St. Louis Children's Hospital, the researchers fou ... more

Ebola virus genome provides clues to repeated disease 'flare-ups' in Western Africa

Ebola virus samples taken from patients in Liberia in June 2015 are strikingly similar in their genetic makeup to other Ebola virus sequences from Western Africa. The study sheds light on several aspects of the "flare-ups" that have occurred in Liberia since the country was initially declar ... more

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering

The fabrication of a prototype tissue having functional properties close to the natural ones is crucial for effective transplantation. Tissue engineering scaffolds are typically used as supports which allow cells to form tissue-like structures essentially required for the correct functionin ... more

Putting antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the immune system under 'surveillance'

A research team led by a Boston College biologist will use a $10-million National Institutes of Health grant to study the role of the immune system in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The research could serve as the foundation for the development of technological applications ... more

Brain cells divide the work to recognize bodies

Specific regions of the brain are specialized in recognizing bodies of animals and human beings. By measuring the electrical activity per cell, scientists from KU Leuven, Belgium, and the University of Glasgow have shown that the individual brain cells in these areas do different things. Th ... more

New method for exhaustively isolating olfactory receptors responding to specific odorants

A research group led by Osaka University and Panasonic Corporation developed a method for making a prompt, exhaustive isolation of olfactory receptors (ORs) responding to the odorant of interest. This achievement will enable quick and easy exhaustive analysis of ORs responding to specific o ... more

Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest thermometer

Researchers at University of Montreal have created a programmable DNA thermometer that is 20,000x smaller than a human hair. This scientific advance reported this week in the journal Nano Letters may significantly aid our understanding of natural and human designed nanotechnologies by enabl ... more

All news

Brain cells divide the work to recognize bodies

Specific regions of the brain are specialized in recognizing bodies of animals and human beings. By measuring the electrical activity per cell, scientists from KU Leuven, Belgium, and the University of Glasgow have shown that the individual brain cells in these areas do different things. Th ... more

New method for exhaustively isolating olfactory receptors responding to specific odorants

A research group led by Osaka University and Panasonic Corporation developed a method for making a prompt, exhaustive isolation of olfactory receptors (ORs) responding to the odorant of interest. This achievement will enable quick and easy exhaustive analysis of ORs responding to specific o ... more

Scientists uncover how a cell's 'fuel gauge' promotes healthy development

Salk scientists have revealed how a cellular "fuel gauge" responsible for monitoring and managing cells' energy processes also has an unexpected role in development. This critical link could help researchers better understand cancer and diabetes pathways. This cellular fuel gauge is a prote ... more

Scientists identify genes that control smooth muscle contraction

Researchers at UMass Medical School have identified a new molecular pathway critical for maintaining the smooth muscle tone that allows the passage of materials through the digestive system. This finding, based on studying calcium ion-controlled pathways in mice, may lead to new treatments ... more

Gateway to the brain

Scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) have derived a structural model of a transporter at the blood-brain barrier called Mfsd2a. This is the first molecular model of this critical transporter, and could prove important for the development of therapeutic agents that need to be d ... more

The gates of serotonin

EPFL scientists have elucidated for the first time how a notoriously elusive serotonin receptor functions with atom-level detail. The receptor transmits electrical signals in neurons and is involved in various disorders, meaning that the discovery opens the way for new treatments. Serotonin ... more

Cellphone principles help microfluidic chip digitize information on living cells

Phone calls and text messages reach you wherever you are because your phone has a unique identifying number that sets you apart from everybody else on the network. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are using a similar principle to track cells being sorted on microfluidic ch ... more

Investigating plasma levels as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease

A Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) paper presents the first detailed study of the relationship between plasma levels of two amyloid beta peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42), brain volumetrics (measures studying the size of brain, which shrinks with Alzheimer's disease) and cognitive perform ... more

In wide range of species, longevity proteins affect dozens of the same genes

Whether a creature is a worm, a fly, a mouse, or a human, death inevitably awaits. And not only do these organisms share a common fate, but also, according to a new study, they may share some of the specific mechanisms of mortality. The researchers found that in all four species, there are ... more

Messenger substance live on show

Scientists have succeeded in making real-time measurements of changes in the concentration of the important messenger substance nitric oxide (NO) in human cells for the first time. The breakthrough, which has been published in the journal "Nature Communications", was achieved by fusing two ... more

All news on bioanalytics

analytica 2016: Key platform for upcoming scientists

analytica (at the Messe München trade-fair center from May 10–13) is more than just the most important platform for scientific experts and well-known equipment manufacturers in the laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology sectors. It is also the first place that future industry pro ... more

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering

The fabrication of a prototype tissue having functional properties close to the natural ones is crucial for effective transplantation. Tissue engineering scaffolds are typically used as supports which allow cells to form tissue-like structures essentially required for the correct functionin ... more

Lonza Reports Record First Quarter

During the first quarter of 2016, Lonza recorded its strongest first quarter in history in terms of sales and earnings. The healthy overall company performance resulted from good results in both the Specialty Ingredients and the Pharma&Biotech segments. “These record-level results in the fi ... more

Designing better drugs

A new strategy for engineering protein fusions -- to make specific cell-targeted drugs without side effects -- could enable a safer, more potent class of protein drugs. A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering designed a better variant of the widely-used drug eryth ... more

From the scent of roses to nylon and plastics

Beguiling scents, sober facts: scents emanating from plants are almost always monoterpenes and monoterpene alcohols, the essential oils of plants are natural hydrocarbon compounds. For instant, geraniol is the tempting fragrant alcohol of roses. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for M ... more

New method enlists electricity for easier, cheaper, greener chemistry

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a new and better way to achieve a chemical reaction that is used widely in the pharmaceutical as well as flavor and fragrance industries. Traditional methods of "allylic oxidation" typically employ toxic and/or expensive reagent ... more

The latest technologies in food and plastics analysis, bioanalysis and genetic analysis

It's just around the corner: analytica, the world's largest trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology, opens its gates in just a few weeks. From May 10 to 13, visitors will experience a unique combination of the entire range of technological innovations as well as the ... more

New optogenetic tool moves proteins within cells to study biological changes

Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have developed a way to embed light-responsive switches into proteins so that researchers can use lasers to manipulate protein movement and activity within living cells and animals. Using this technique, the UNC team of scien ... more

Reader of epigenetic marks could be 'game changer' for certain cancers

If genes form the body's blueprint, then the layer of epigenetics decides which parts of the plan get built. Unfortunately, many cancers hijack epigenetics to modulate the expression of genes, thus promoting cancer growth and survival. A team of researchers led by Tatiana Kutateladze, PhD, ... more

BRAIN and Südzucker cooperate in the field of CO2 utilisation by microorganisms

BRAIN AG and Südzucker AG are intensifying their cooperation in the field of microbial utilisation of carbon dioxide. The cooperation, which is co-financed by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) as part of the strategic alliance ZeroCarbFP, aims at making the industrial by- ... more

All news on biotechnology

Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest thermometer

Researchers at University of Montreal have created a programmable DNA thermometer that is 20,000x smaller than a human hair. This scientific advance reported this week in the journal Nano Letters may significantly aid our understanding of natural and human designed nanotechnologies by enabl ... more

Researchers find nerve damage may precede diabetic retinopathy

A University of Iowa-led study of diabetes-related vision impairment holds good news -- and some bad news -- for patients with signs of these disorders. Scientists have long known that patients with diabetes mellitus -- both Type 1 and Type 2 -- are at high risk for developing diabetic reti ... more

The gates of serotonin

EPFL scientists have elucidated for the first time how a notoriously elusive serotonin receptor functions with atom-level detail. The receptor transmits electrical signals in neurons and is involved in various disorders, meaning that the discovery opens the way for new treatments. Serotonin ... more

Problems finding your way around may be earliest sign of Alzheimer's disease

Long before Alzheimer's disease can be diagnosed clinically, increasing difficulties building cognitive maps of new surroundings may herald the eventual clinical onset of the disorder, finds new research from Washington University in St. Louis. "These findings suggest that navigational task ... more

Cellphone principles help microfluidic chip digitize information on living cells

Phone calls and text messages reach you wherever you are because your phone has a unique identifying number that sets you apart from everybody else on the network. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are using a similar principle to track cells being sorted on microfluidic ch ... more

The latest technologies in food and plastics analysis, bioanalysis and genetic analysis

It's just around the corner: analytica, the world's largest trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology, opens its gates in just a few weeks. From May 10 to 13, visitors will experience a unique combination of the entire range of technological innovations as well as the ... more

Investigating plasma levels as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease

A Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) paper presents the first detailed study of the relationship between plasma levels of two amyloid beta peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42), brain volumetrics (measures studying the size of brain, which shrinks with Alzheimer's disease) and cognitive perform ... more

Lung ultrasound may be a safe substitute for chest X-ray when diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound has been shown to be highly effective and safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children and a potential substitute for chest X-ray, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Results are currently published in the medical journal Chest. Pneumo ... more

Neuronal structures associated with memory sprout in response to novel molecules

Chemists at the University of California San Diego have designed a set of molecules that promote microscopic, anatomical changes in neurons associated with the formation and retention of memories. These drug candidates also prevent deterioration of the same neuronal structures in the presen ... more

New predictive tool for assessing breast cancer risk

Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and collaborators at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have identified a molecular marker in normal breast tissue that can predict a woman's risk for developing breast cancer, the leading cause of death i ... more

All news on diagnostics

analytica 2016: Key platform for upcoming scientists

analytica (at the Messe München trade-fair center from May 10–13) is more than just the most important platform for scientific experts and well-known equipment manufacturers in the laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology sectors. It is also the first place that future industry pro ... more

The latest technologies in food and plastics analysis, bioanalysis and genetic analysis

It's just around the corner: analytica, the world's largest trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology, opens its gates in just a few weeks. From May 10 to 13, visitors will experience a unique combination of the entire range of technological innovations as well as the ... more

Sartorius Off to a Dynamic Start in 2016

Sartorius got off to a successful start in fiscal 2016, with double-digit gains in sales revenue and earnings. "We continue to see dynamic growth driven by both divisions and all business regions," commented CEO Dr. Joachim Kreuzburg. "Especially our larger Bioprocess Solutions Division has ... more

Laboratory of the future at analytica in Munich in the present

Everyone is talking about digitalizing society and industry. Doing so will also have an enormous influence on the laboratory. analytica, which takes place in Munich from May 10–13, 2016, will examine the challenges facing manufacturers and users and what solutions are already available for ... more

LUM GmbH starts exclusive distribution of PSI-homogenizers in several countries

With immediate effect LUM GmbH, Berlin, Germany, starts the exclusive distribution of PSI instruments in Germany, Austria, France and China. The distributorship agreement between the manufacturer Particle Solutions Innovations BV from the Netherlands and LUM GmbH forms part of the developme ... more

analytica Vietnam is moving to Hanoi

The fifth edition of analytica Vietnam, a spin-off of analytica in Munich, will take place at the International Center for Exhibition (I.C.E.) in Hanoi from March 29 to 31, 2017. Moving the trade fair from Ho Chi Minh City to the Vietnamese capital has advantages: Hanoi is the political cen ... more

Recognizing and avoiding dangers in the laboratory

In many cases, even the slightest mistake can have devastating consequences. Dealing with hazardous materials in the laboratory calls for extreme caution. Visitors attending analytica (May 10–13, 2016, Messe München) can find out how laboratory employees should act and what protective measu ... more

Sartorius Grows by Double Digits

Sartorius grew very dynamically again in 2015 according to its preliminary figures and further increased its profitability. The company achieved or exceeded its financial targets raised during the reporting year. For the current fiscal year as well, management expects to record significant ... more

The device with the fine nose

When it comes to measuring the smallest traces of volatile chemical compounds in the air, the analysis devices in Pablo Sinues' laboratory are among the most sensitive in the world. They can find the proverbial needle in a haystack: the detection limit for airborne volatile compounds is aro ... more

New nanomanufacturing technique advances imaging, biosensing technology

More than a decade ago, theorists predicted the possibility of a nanolens--a chain of three nanoscale spheres that would focus incoming light into a spot much smaller than possible with conventional microscopy. Such a device would make possible extremely high-resolution imaging or biologica ... more

All news on lab technology

Scientists teaching machines to make clinical trials more successful

Scientists are teaching computers to figure out why people accept or decline invitations to participate in clinical trials. Recruiting sufficient numbers of participants is a current challenge in medical research that can compromise results or stop some studies altogether. Researchers at Ci ... more

Danish researchers behind vaccine breakthrough

The next generation of vaccines may soon see the light of day, because Danish researchers have discovered a completely new and simple method which sets new standards for the development of vaccines. "The major research breakthrough is that we have created a general and user-friendly platfor ... more

Lonza Reports Record First Quarter

During the first quarter of 2016, Lonza recorded its strongest first quarter in history in terms of sales and earnings. The healthy overall company performance resulted from good results in both the Specialty Ingredients and the Pharma&Biotech segments. “These record-level results in the fi ... more

Designing better drugs

A new strategy for engineering protein fusions -- to make specific cell-targeted drugs without side effects -- could enable a safer, more potent class of protein drugs. A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering designed a better variant of the widely-used drug eryth ... more

Study identifies compound that reverses symptoms of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders worldwide and cause untold suffering to millions of patients and their families. Treatments for these diseases are limited, and no cures exist. Now, a new study describes an innovative strategy that reve ... more

Nutrient supplements can give antidepressants a boost

An international evidence review has found that certain nutritional supplements can increase the effectiveness of antidepressants for people with clinical depression. Omega 3 fish oils, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), methylfolate (bioactive form of folate) and Vitamin D, were all found to boo ... more

Successful laboratory test of photoswitchable anti-tumor agent

Photoswitchable agents might reduce side effects of a chemotherapy. So far, photodynamic therapies have been dependent on oxygen in the tissue. But hardly any oxygen exists in malignant, rapidly growing tumors. A group of researchers of KIT and the University of Kiev has now developed a pho ... more

Can we hypercharge vaccines?

Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report that a fatty chemical naturally found in damaged tissues can induce an unexpected kind of immune response, causing immune cells to go into a "hyperactive" state that is highly effective at rallying infection-fighting T-cells. The findings, pu ... more

The latest technologies in food and plastics analysis, bioanalysis and genetic analysis

It's just around the corner: analytica, the world's largest trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology, opens its gates in just a few weeks. From May 10 to 13, visitors will experience a unique combination of the entire range of technological innovations as well as the ... more

Sartorius Off to a Dynamic Start in 2016

Sartorius got off to a successful start in fiscal 2016, with double-digit gains in sales revenue and earnings. "We continue to see dynamic growth driven by both divisions and all business regions," commented CEO Dr. Joachim Kreuzburg. "Especially our larger Bioprocess Solutions Division has ... more

All news on pharma

A New Discovery in the Fight against Cancer

When medication is used to shut off the oxygen supply to tumor cells, the cells adapt their metabolism in the medium term – by switching over to producing energy without oxygen. This observation by biomedical scientists at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel could be used ... more

Radiation and immunotherapy combination can destroy both primary and secondary tumors

Radiation therapy not only kills cancer cells, but also helps to activate the immune system against their future proliferation. However, this immune response is often not strong enough to be able to cure tumours, and even when it is, its effect is limited to the area that has been irradiate ... more

Breast milk linked to significant early brain growth in preemies

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. Studying preterm infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at St. Louis Children's Hospital, the researchers fou ... more

Ebola virus genome provides clues to repeated disease 'flare-ups' in Western Africa

Ebola virus samples taken from patients in Liberia in June 2015 are strikingly similar in their genetic makeup to other Ebola virus sequences from Western Africa. The study sheds light on several aspects of the "flare-ups" that have occurred in Liberia since the country was initially declar ... more

Putting antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the immune system under 'surveillance'

A research team led by a Boston College biologist will use a $10-million National Institutes of Health grant to study the role of the immune system in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The research could serve as the foundation for the development of technological applications ... more

Brain cells divide the work to recognize bodies

Specific regions of the brain are specialized in recognizing bodies of animals and human beings. By measuring the electrical activity per cell, scientists from KU Leuven, Belgium, and the University of Glasgow have shown that the individual brain cells in these areas do different things. Th ... more

Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest thermometer

Researchers at University of Montreal have created a programmable DNA thermometer that is 20,000x smaller than a human hair. This scientific advance reported this week in the journal Nano Letters may significantly aid our understanding of natural and human designed nanotechnologies by enabl ... more

Scientists teaching machines to make clinical trials more successful

Scientists are teaching computers to figure out why people accept or decline invitations to participate in clinical trials. Recruiting sufficient numbers of participants is a current challenge in medical research that can compromise results or stop some studies altogether. Researchers at Ci ... more

Researchers find nerve damage may precede diabetic retinopathy

A University of Iowa-led study of diabetes-related vision impairment holds good news -- and some bad news -- for patients with signs of these disorders. Scientists have long known that patients with diabetes mellitus -- both Type 1 and Type 2 -- are at high risk for developing diabetic reti ... more

Got good fat?

People who want to lose weight often encounter boundaries: No matter what diet they try, the pounds won’t drop. Being overweight and obese can have severe health consequences, and has shown to increase a person’s chance of developing type-2-diabetes or cardiovascular diseases. Prof. Dr. Al ... more

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