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Almirall half-year results 2016

Almirall, the global pharmaceutical company based in Barcelona, has announced its results for the first half of 2016. Eduardo Sanchiz, CEO, commented: "We have delivered a solid set of results in first half of 2016, boosted by Dermatology which puts us on track to achieve our yearly guidanc ... more

Merck Biopharma Innovation Cup honors young scientists

Merck announced the winners of its sixth Biopharma Innovation Cup. The winning team received €20,000 for its “controlling schistosomiasis transmission” approach in the Global Health area.The Biopharma Innovation Cup highlights Merck’s commitment to developing the next generation of biopharm ... more

Water-resistant thanks to a biofilm

Moisture can destroy mortar over time – for example when cracks form as a result of frost. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found an unusual way to protect mortar from moisture: When the material is being mixed, they add a biofilm – a soft, moist substanc ... more

Severity of enzyme deficiency central to favism

The congenital disease favism causes sickness and even jaundice in patients after they consume beans. The culprit is a particular enzyme deficiency, which destroys the red blood cells. Scientists from the University Children’s Hospital Zurich have now discovered that, in the event of a seve ... more

Embryonic gene Nanog reverses aging in adult stem cells

In a series of experiments at the University at Buffalo, the gene kicked into action dormant cellular processes that are key to preventing weak bones, clogged arteries and other telltale signs of growing old. The findings also show promise in counteracting premature aging disorders such as ... more

Bio-engineered molecule shows promise for quick control of bleeding

Every five minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a blood clot, through its role in strokes, heart attacks or other severe conditions. For decades, doctors have used the anticoagulant drug warfarin (Coumadin) to prevent clots. More recently, newer anticoagulants such as Xarelto, Eliquis and ... more

Patch delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer. The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incompl ... more

The chemical industry needs better framework conditions for solid growth

Business is not going smoothly in Germany’s third largest industry. Production in the chemical-pharmaceutical industry stagnated in the 1st half 2016. Sales fell clearly, as compared with the previous year: With another drop in producer prices, sales of this industry declined by 3.5 percent ... more

Novel intravenous antibacterial to treat C. Difficile infections grants FDA approval

Morphochem, a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has designated Morphochem’s intravenous (IV) antibacterial product candidate MCB3837 as a Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) for the treatment of Clostridium difficile in ... more

Medigene expands platform technology with patent for identification of CD4+ T cell antigens

Medigene AG, a clinical stage immune-oncology company focusing on the development of T cell immuno-therapies for the treatment of cancer, announces the grant of US patent US9,341,617B2. The patent, with an expected life-span until 2030, claims a method for the identification of antigens rec ... more

All news

Breast cancer: finding the smoking gun

Many genes are associated with cancer. The trick is proving they actually promote tumor formation. One approach, detailed by Ian Macara , Ph.D., and colleagues is an in vivo “gain-of-function” screen. The researchers used a gene “library” (complementary DNA carried by lentivirus) to increas ... more

A Peek into the “Birthing Room” of Ribosomes

A type of scaffolding on which specialised workers ply their trade helps in the manufacturing process of the two subunits from which the ribosome – the protein factory of the cell – originates. Biochemists at Heidelberg University discovered it after succeeding in getting a peek into the ri ... more

New images of a calcium-shuttling molecule that has been linked to aggressive cancer

Scientists have captured new images of a calcium-shuttling molecule that has been linked to aggressive cancers. The three-dimensional structure could help researchers develop novel therapies and diagnostic tools for diseases that are caused by a malfunction in calcium adsorption. Alexander ... more

Adipose analysis on microfluidic chips

A Freiburg-based research group has developed a microfluidic chip where more than one hundred apidose-derived adult stem cell cultures can grow and divide. In the human body, adipose tissue acts as a primary energy store. Adult stem cells have the task of maintaining and regenerating this p ... more

High-resolution imaging reveals the secrets of a bacterial toxin

Many bacteria use specialized toxins to attack and infect other cells. Scientists at EPFL and the University of Bern have now modeled a major such toxin with unprecedented resolution, uncovering the way it works step-by-step. In order to infect other cells, many bacteria secrete a type of t ... more

Researchers harness DNA as the engine of super-efficient nanomachine

Researchers at McMaster University have established a way to harness DNA as the engine of a microscopic "machine" they can turn on to detect trace amounts of substances that range from viruses and bacteria to cocaine and metals. "It's a completely new platform that can be adapted to many ki ... more

Seeing RNA at the nanoscale

Cells contain thousands of messenger RNA molecules, which carry copies of DNA's genetic instructions to the rest of the cell. MIT engineers have now developed a way to visualize these molecules in higher resolution than previously possible in intact tissues, allowing researchers to precisel ... more

Rapid test identifies disease pathogens

At present, bacteria, fungi or viruses can generally only be detected with certainty by way of elaborate laboratory tests or animal experiments. The food and pharmaceutical industries would like to have faster tests to check their products. Fraunhofer researchers are therefore developing a ... more

Sartorius acquires cell screening specialist

Sartorius announced the acquisition of U.S. based IntelliCyt Corporation, an award-winning innovator and manufacturer of novel cell screening platforms used in drug discovery. Through the acquisition, Sartorius expands its current lab portfolio into bio analytics, thus substantially strengt ... more

The large-scale stability of chromosomes

"Interphase" refers to the period in the cell cycle in which chromosomes spend most of their time. During this phase, in between mitoses, chromosomes live "dissolved'' in the nucleus where they carry out the processes required for the duplication of genetic material. Our current knowledge r ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Water-resistant thanks to a biofilm

Moisture can destroy mortar over time – for example when cracks form as a result of frost. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found an unusual way to protect mortar from moisture: When the material is being mixed, they add a biofilm – a soft, moist substanc ... more

Researchers temporarily turn off brain area to better understand function

Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers at the California National Primate Research Center, or CNPRC, at the University of California, Davis, have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining br ... more

BioTek Instruments embarks on major site expansion

BioTek Instruments celebrated the start of a $4 million, 22,000 square foot facility expansion during a company-wide event on Monday, July 18, featuring honorable guests Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy, Congressman Peter Welch, Governor Peter Shumlin, and Lt. Governor Phil Scott. The increase ... more

Cancer-fighting bacteria

Researchers at MIT and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) have recruited some new soldiers in the fight against cancer — bacteria. In a study the scientists programmed harmless strains of bacteria to deliver toxic payloads. When deployed together with a traditional cancer drug ... more

Merck Starts Construction on $115 Million Multi-faceted Life Science Campus in Burlington, Massachusetts

Merck announced plans to build a new campus in Burlington, Massachusetts that will serve as a major hub for the North American life science business of Merck. The 280,000-square-foot facility will include a customer collaboration laboratory and training center as well as office space. “This ... more

Comparing fungal secretions to uncover carbon compound degradation pathways

Their unassuming appearances may cause them to be overshadowed by the plants or animals in their natural habitats, but fungi play key roles in maintaining their ecosystems. From breaking down leaf litter and decaying wood in forests to cleaning contaminated soils and waters, fungal enzymes ... more

Surface tension can sort droplets for biomedical applications

Imagine being able to instantly diagnose diabetes, Ebola or some other disease, simply by watching how a droplet of blood moves on a surface. That's just one potential impact of new research led by Arun Kota, assistant professor in Colorado State University's Department of Mechanical Engine ... more

An antibody-based drug for multiple sclerosis

Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien ("Serine Proteases and Physiopathology of the Neurovascular Unit") has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis. The study directed by Fabian Docagne paves the way for a new strategy to control the d ... more

Biochemists feed 'poison pill' to deadly virus with a funny name

It has a funny name - coxsackievirus - but there's nothing funny about how this tiny germ and its close relatives sicken their hosts. Colorado State University researchers led by Olve Peersen, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, have designed a genetic modif ... more

Remote-controlled implantable device delivers HIV prevention drug

A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) awarded Alessandro Gratto ... more

All news on biotechnology

Severity of enzyme deficiency central to favism

The congenital disease favism causes sickness and even jaundice in patients after they consume beans. The culprit is a particular enzyme deficiency, which destroys the red blood cells. Scientists from the University Children’s Hospital Zurich have now discovered that, in the event of a seve ... more

Researchers temporarily turn off brain area to better understand function

Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers at the California National Primate Research Center, or CNPRC, at the University of California, Davis, have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining br ... more

Zika virus test receives FDA emergency use authorization

Viracor-IBT Laboratories Inc. (Viracor-IBT), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Eurofins Scientific (EUFI.PA), announced that it received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Zika Virus Real-time RT-PCR assay. Viracor-IBT will perform this ass ... more

New nanoscale technologies could revolutionize microscopes, study of disease

Research completed through a collaboration with University of Missouri engineers, biologists, and chemists could transform how scientists study molecules and cells at sub-microscopic (nanoscale) levels. Shubra Gangopadhyay, an electrical and computer engineer and her team at MU recently pub ... more

New protocol enables analysis of metabolic products from fixed tissues

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a new mass spectrometry imaging method which, for the first time, makes it possible to analyze hundreds of metabolites in fixed tissue samples. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Protocols, explain the new access to met ... more

What free will looks like in the brain

Johns Hopkins University researchers are the first to glimpse the human brain making a purely voluntary decision to act. Unlike most brain studies where scientists watch as people respond to cues or commands, Johns Hopkins researchers found a way to observe people's brain activity as they m ... more

Veggie juice that illuminates the gut

The pigment that gives spinach and other plants their verdant color may improve doctors' ability to examine the human gastrointestinal tract. That's according to a study which describes how chlorophyll-based nanoparticles suspended in liquid are an effective imaging agent for the gut. "Our ... more

Discovery of new ovarian cancer signaling hub points to target for limiting metastasis

Like pancreatic cancer, cancer of the ovaries is notorious for being discovered at a relatively late stage - after it has spread to other sites in the body. It is not called "the silent killer" for nothing. Fully two-thirds of women who are diagnosed find out at Stage 3 or later, once metas ... more

Ultrashort cell-free DNA reveals health of organ transplants

When cells die, whether through apoptosis or necrosis, the DNA and other molecules found in those cells don't just disappear. They wind up in the blood stream, where degraded bits and pieces can be extracted. This cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is degraded due to its exposure to enzymes in the blood ... more

Mitochondrial stress induces cancer-related metabolic shifts

Cancerous tumors must be fed. Their unregulated growth requires a steady stream of blood flow and nutrients. Thus, one way that researchers have tried to wipe out cancer is to target cells undergoing the metabolic shifts that enable a tumor's rapid growth. Yet new findings from University o ... more

All news on diagnostics

Water-resistant thanks to a biofilm

Moisture can destroy mortar over time – for example when cracks form as a result of frost. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found an unusual way to protect mortar from moisture: When the material is being mixed, they add a biofilm – a soft, moist substanc ... more

BioTek Instruments embarks on major site expansion

BioTek Instruments celebrated the start of a $4 million, 22,000 square foot facility expansion during a company-wide event on Monday, July 18, featuring honorable guests Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy, Congressman Peter Welch, Governor Peter Shumlin, and Lt. Governor Phil Scott. The increase ... more

Company take-over of Slamed ING GmbH by Ratiolab GmbH

Company Ratiolab GmbH has taken over Slamed ING GmbH with effect on 05th July 2016. Ratiolab GmbH will continue the existing business activities without any change. In 1987 Slamed ING GmbH was founded in the city of Frankfurt, Germany by Mr. Eugen Gieldzik. After more than 30 years business ... more

Eppendorf AG: Change in Supervisory Board

At the Annual General Meeting of June 3, 2016, Klaus Fink stepped down from his position as Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Eppendorf AG and resigned from the Board. Mr. Fink led and developed the company as Chief Executive Officer for 22 years before becoming Chairman of the Superviso ... more

Thermo Fisher Scientific to acquire FEI Company

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., and FEI Company announced that their boards of directors have unanimously approved Thermo Fisher’s acquisition of FEI for $107.50 per share in cash. The transaction represents a purchase price of approximately $4.2 billion. FEI designs, manufactures and suppor ... more

analytica 2016: Record number of exhibitors thanks to 6.5 percent increase

During the past four days (May 10 to 13), a total of 1,244 exhibitors from 40 countries presented their product innovations including a number of world premieres to some 35,000 visitors at analytica. There was a considerable increase it the share of exhibitors and visitors from abroad. As a ... more

RephiLe Appoints Peter Lucas as President, North America

RephiLe Bioscience Ltd. has appointed Peter Lucas as President-North America effective March 15, 2016. Mr. Lucas will be responsible for all North America operations for RephiLe.  Peter brings a wealth of experience, global leadership, and extensive market knowledge to RephiLe Bioscience.  ... more

analytica 2016: Key platform for upcoming scientists

analytica (at the Messe München trade-fair center from May 10–13) is more than just the most important platform for scientific experts and well-known equipment manufacturers in the laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology sectors. It is also the first place that future industry pro ... more

The latest technologies in food and plastics analysis, bioanalysis and genetic analysis

It's just around the corner: analytica, the world's largest trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology, opens its gates in just a few weeks. From May 10 to 13, visitors will experience a unique combination of the entire range of technological innovations as well as the ... more

Sartorius Off to a Dynamic Start in 2016

Sartorius got off to a successful start in fiscal 2016, with double-digit gains in sales revenue and earnings. "We continue to see dynamic growth driven by both divisions and all business regions," commented CEO Dr. Joachim Kreuzburg. "Especially our larger Bioprocess Solutions Division has ... more

All news on lab technology

Almirall half-year results 2016

Almirall, the global pharmaceutical company based in Barcelona, has announced its results for the first half of 2016. Eduardo Sanchiz, CEO, commented: "We have delivered a solid set of results in first half of 2016, boosted by Dermatology which puts us on track to achieve our yearly guidanc ... more

Merck Biopharma Innovation Cup honors young scientists

Merck announced the winners of its sixth Biopharma Innovation Cup. The winning team received €20,000 for its “controlling schistosomiasis transmission” approach in the Global Health area.The Biopharma Innovation Cup highlights Merck’s commitment to developing the next generation of biopharm ... more

Bio-engineered molecule shows promise for quick control of bleeding

Every five minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a blood clot, through its role in strokes, heart attacks or other severe conditions. For decades, doctors have used the anticoagulant drug warfarin (Coumadin) to prevent clots. More recently, newer anticoagulants such as Xarelto, Eliquis and ... more

Patch delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer. The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incompl ... more

The chemical industry needs better framework conditions for solid growth

Business is not going smoothly in Germany’s third largest industry. Production in the chemical-pharmaceutical industry stagnated in the 1st half 2016. Sales fell clearly, as compared with the previous year: With another drop in producer prices, sales of this industry declined by 3.5 percent ... more

Novel intravenous antibacterial to treat C. Difficile infections grants FDA approval

Morphochem, a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has designated Morphochem’s intravenous (IV) antibacterial product candidate MCB3837 as a Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) for the treatment of Clostridium difficile in ... more

Medigene expands platform technology with patent for identification of CD4+ T cell antigens

Medigene AG, a clinical stage immune-oncology company focusing on the development of T cell immuno-therapies for the treatment of cancer, announces the grant of US patent US9,341,617B2. The patent, with an expected life-span until 2030, claims a method for the identification of antigens rec ... more

Zika virus test receives FDA emergency use authorization

Viracor-IBT Laboratories Inc. (Viracor-IBT), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Eurofins Scientific (EUFI.PA), announced that it received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Zika Virus Real-time RT-PCR assay. Viracor-IBT will perform this ass ... more

An antibody-based drug for multiple sclerosis

Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien ("Serine Proteases and Physiopathology of the Neurovascular Unit") has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis. The study directed by Fabian Docagne paves the way for a new strategy to control the d ... more

Merck Receives EMA Acceptance for Review of Marketing Authorization Application for Cladribine Tablets

Merck announced that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has accepted for review the Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) of the investigational product Cladribine Tablets for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). “Our submission of the Marketing Authorization A ... more

All news on pharma

Severity of enzyme deficiency central to favism

The congenital disease favism causes sickness and even jaundice in patients after they consume beans. The culprit is a particular enzyme deficiency, which destroys the red blood cells. Scientists from the University Children’s Hospital Zurich have now discovered that, in the event of a seve ... more

Embryonic gene Nanog reverses aging in adult stem cells

In a series of experiments at the University at Buffalo, the gene kicked into action dormant cellular processes that are key to preventing weak bones, clogged arteries and other telltale signs of growing old. The findings also show promise in counteracting premature aging disorders such as ... more

Bio-engineered molecule shows promise for quick control of bleeding

Every five minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a blood clot, through its role in strokes, heart attacks or other severe conditions. For decades, doctors have used the anticoagulant drug warfarin (Coumadin) to prevent clots. More recently, newer anticoagulants such as Xarelto, Eliquis and ... more

Patch delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer. The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incompl ... more

Scientists develop painless and inexpensive microneedle system to monitor drugs

Researchers at the University of British Columbia and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland have created a microneedle drug monitoring system that could one day replace costly, invasive blood draws and improve patient comfort. The new system consists of a small, thin patch that is ... more

Cerebrospinal fluid signals control the behavior of stem cells in the brain

Prof. Fiona Doetsch’s research team at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered that the choroid plexus, a largely ignored structure in the brain that produces the cerebrospinal fluid, is an important regulator of adult neural stem cells. The study also shows that signals secrete ... more

Researchers temporarily turn off brain area to better understand function

Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers at the California National Primate Research Center, or CNPRC, at the University of California, Davis, have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining br ... more

Forms of HIV can cross from chimps to humans

No one knows exactly how it happened. It may have entered through a cut or bite wound, the blood of a chimpanzee seeping into an exposed fingertip or forearm or foot. But in the early 1900s, probably near a West African rainforest, it's thought that a hunter or vendor of bush meat - wild ga ... more

Cancer-fighting bacteria

Researchers at MIT and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) have recruited some new soldiers in the fight against cancer — bacteria. In a study the scientists programmed harmless strains of bacteria to deliver toxic payloads. When deployed together with a traditional cancer drug ... more

Breastfeeding protects against diabetes for up to 15 years after

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München has studied the metabolism of women with gestational diabetes after giving birth. Along with partners at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), they were able to sho ... more

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