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Research demonstrates millions of plastic particles exist in cosmetic products

Everyday cosmetic and cleaning products contain huge quantities of plastic particles, which are released to the environment and could be harmful to marine life, according to a new study. Research at Plymouth University has shown almost 100,000 tiny 'microbeads' - each a fraction of a millim ... more

Supercomputers enlisted to shed light on photosynthesis

Computing enables scientists and engineers to analyse highly complex physical processes using simulation techniques. In this case, researchers in the UPV/EHU's Department of Computer Architecture and Technology and the Department of Materials Physics are collaborating with researchers from ... more

Low-level arsenic exposure before birth associated with early puberty and obesity

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. The finding is significant because the exposure level of 10 parts per bi ... more

New optical method promises faster, more accurate diagnosis of breast cancer

A new optical method for more quickly and accurately determining whether breast tissue lesions are cancerous is described by University of Illinois researchers. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Chicago researchers Hassaan Majeed, Mikhail Kandel, Kevin Han, Zelun Luo, Virgilia ... more

Cellular contamination pathway for plutonium, other heavy elements, identified

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have reported an advance in understanding the biological chemistry of radioactive metals, opening up new avenues of research into strategies for remedial action in the event of possible human exposure to nuclear contaminants. Research led ... more

Holocaust survivors pass on trauma to their children’s genes

An international team lead by Rachel Yehuda, professor at Mount Sinai hospital in New York, and for the molecular analyses Elisabeth Binder, director at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, studied the genes of 32 Jewish individuals who had been held in concentration camps, exp ... more

Flu remedies help combat E. coli bacteria

If the intestinal bacteria level becomes unbalanced, it can cause diseases. Physiologists from the University of Zurich reveal how a specific carbohydrate in the intestinal mucosa heavily multiplies certain E. coli bacteria and thus causes inflammations. These could be treated with flu reme ... more

Opioid receptor gene variations associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome severity

A study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) indicates that variations in opioid receptor genes are associated with more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in newborn babies. The findings, published in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, could help lead to the development of indi ... more

Glitter from silver lights up Alzheimer's dark secrets

Scientists have caught a glimpse of the elusive toxic form of the Alzheimer's molecule, during its attempt to bore into the outer covering of a cell decoy, using a new method involving laser light and fat-coated silver nano-particles. While the origin of Alzheimer's Disease, one that robs t ... more

Injectable cryogel-based whole-cell cancer vaccines

Research led by Wyss Core Faculty member David Mooney, Ph.D., in collaboration with researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute could potentially yield a new platform for cancer vaccines. Leveraging a biologically inspired sponge-like gel called "cryogel" as an injectable biomaterial, t ... more

All news

Glitter from silver lights up Alzheimer's dark secrets

Scientists have caught a glimpse of the elusive toxic form of the Alzheimer's molecule, during its attempt to bore into the outer covering of a cell decoy, using a new method involving laser light and fat-coated silver nano-particles. While the origin of Alzheimer's Disease, one that robs t ... more

Research team identifies structure of tumor-suppressing protein

An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN. Their findings provide new insights into how the protein regulates cell growth and how mutatio ... more

Two proteins work together to help cells eliminate trash and Parkinson's may result

Two proteins that share the ability to help cells deal with their trash appear to need each other to do their jobs and when they don't connect, it appears to contribute to development of Parkinson's disease, scientists report.Much like a community's network for garbage handling, cells also ... more

Roche to acquire Kapa Biosystems

Roche announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Kapa Biosystems, Inc. (Kapa) a privately-held company headquartered in Wilmington, Massachusetts, US. Kapa Biosystems is a provider of genomic tools in the life sciences sector that employs proprietary technologies to opti ... more

Finding biomarkers for early lung cancer diagnosis

Lung cancer patients are often diagnosed only when their disease is already at an advanced stage and hard to treat. Researchers at the West Coast Metabolomics Center at UC Davis are trying to change that, by identifying biomarkers that could be the basis of early tests for lung cancer. Lung ... more

Scientists and NASA astronauts developing near real-time osteoporosis and bone cancer test

A new test for offers the possibility of near real time monitoring of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis and multiple myeloma. The functionality of the test, which measures changes in calcium isotope ratios, has been validated on blood samples from NASA space shuttle astronauts. Geochemist ... more

Researchers develop advanced cell screening technology for cancer immunotherapy

Researchers have created a new method for screening cells used in immunotherapy cancer treatments, allowing high-performing immune system cells to be studied in isolation and potentially expanding the number of patients for whom the breakthrough treatment proves successful. Engineers from t ... more

Stem cells help researchers study the effects of pollution on human health

A recent study shows that embryonic stem cells could serve as a model to evaluate the physiological effects of environmental pollutants efficiently and cost-effectively. The use of stem cells has found another facade. In the world we live in today, people are constantly exposed to artificia ... more

Scientists adopt new strategy to find Huntington's disease therapies

Scientists searched the chromosomes of more than 4,000 Huntington's disease patients and found that DNA repair genes may determine when the neurological symptoms begin. The results may provide a guide for discovering new treatments for Huntington's disease and a roadmap for studying other n ... more

Atomic view of microtubules

Microtubules, hollow fibers of tubulin protein only a few nanometers in diameter, form the cytoskeletons of living cells and play a crucial role in cell division through their ability to undergo rapid growth and shrinkage, a property called "dynamic instability." Through a combination of hi ... more

All news on bioanalytics

These microscopic fish are 3-D-printed to do more than swim

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego used a 3D printing technology they developed to manufacture multipurpose fish-shaped microrobots that swim around efficiently in liquids, are chemically powered by hydrogen peroxide and magnetically controlled. These proof-of-concept ... more

Another milestone in hybrid artificial photosynthesis

A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) developing a bioinorganic hybrid approach to artificial photosynthesis have achieved another milestone. Having generated quite a buzz with their hybrid system of semiconductin ... more

FSU researcher identifies protein with promise for cancer therapy

In the second part of his lab's recent one-two punch, Florida State University researcher Daniel Kaplan said he has solved a cell division mystery in a way that will intrigue the makers of cancer-fighting drugs. The key, said Kaplan, a College of Medicine Department of Biomedical Sciences r ... more

Scientists discover electrical control of cancer cell growth

The molecular switches regulating human cell growth do a great job of replacing cells that die during the course of a lifetime. But when they misfire, life-threatening cancers can occur. Research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has re ... more

NSF grant for engineering noses, jaws and ears

Laboratory-engineered noses, jaws and ears. The stuff science fiction is made of is coming soon from a University of Akron lab. With a $390,000 NSF grant, Matthew Becker, UA professor of polymer science and biomedical engineering, is developing 3-D-printed biodegradable polymer scaffolds, t ... more

Research team identifies structure of tumor-suppressing protein

An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN. Their findings provide new insights into how the protein regulates cell growth and how mutatio ... more

Engineered hot fat implants reduce weight gain in mice

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a novel way to engineer the growth and expansion of energy-burning "good" fat, and then found that this fat helped reduce weight gain and lower blood glucose levels in mice. The authors of the study in the journal Diabetes ... more

New drug protects against the deadly effects of nuclear radiation 24 hours after exposure

An interdisciplinary research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reports a new breakthrough in countering the deadly effects of radiation exposure. A single injection of a regenerative peptide was shown to significantly increase survival in mice when given 24 ho ... more

Chestnut leaves yield extract that disarms deadly staph bacteria

A study showed the ability of a chestnut leaf extract to block Staphlococcus aureus virulence and pathogenesis without detectable resistance. The use of chestnut leaves in traditional folk remedies inspired the research, led by Cassandra Quave, an ethnobotanist at Emory University. "We've i ... more

How DNA 'proofreader' proteins pick and edit their reading material

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have discovered how two important proofreader proteins know where to look for errors during DNA replication and how they work together to signal the body's repair mechanism. When a cell prep ... more

All news on biotechnology

New optical method promises faster, more accurate diagnosis of breast cancer

A new optical method for more quickly and accurately determining whether breast tissue lesions are cancerous is described by University of Illinois researchers. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Chicago researchers Hassaan Majeed, Mikhail Kandel, Kevin Han, Zelun Luo, Virgilia ... more

Relapse, poor survival in leukemia linked to genetic mutations that persist in remission

For patients with an often-deadly form of leukemia, new research suggests that lingering cancer-related mutations - detected after initial treatment with chemotherapy - are associated with an increased risk of relapse and poor survival. Using genetic profiling to study bone marrow samples f ... more

PET imaging detects fast-growing prostate cancer

A molecular imaging biomarker is able to detect fast-growing primary prostate cancer and distinguish it from benign prostate lesions, addressing an unmet clinical need. The new research, published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, is significant for patients with suspected prostate cancer ... more

Optical 'dog's nose' may hold key to breath analysis

University of Adelaide researchers are developing a laser system for fast, non-invasive, onsite breath analysis for disease, potentially enabling screening for a range of diseases including diabetes, infections and various cancers in the future. The researchers have developed an instrument ... more

GNA Biosolutions completes € 6 million financing round

GNA Biosolutions GmbH (GNA), a manufacturer of ultrafast pathogen diagnostic instruments, will receive fresh capital of € 6 million in a series B financing round. Founded in 2010, GNA welcomes new investors Robert Bosch Venture Capital (RBVC), SHS Gesellschaft für Beteiligungsmanagement Gmb ... more

QIAGEN and Biotype Diagnostics form partnership

QIAGEN and Biotype Diagnostics GmbH announced that they have entered into a partnership to establish Biotype Innovation GmbH ("Biotype Innovation"). The new company will develop and commercialize molecular diagnostic workflows initially for personalized healthcare applications based on QIAG ... more

Thousands of Droplets for Diagnostics

A team of scientists including PhD student Friedrich Schuler from the Laboratory of MEMS Applications at the Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) of the University of Freiburg has developed a method for dividing a DNA sample into thousands of tiny droplets. What sets it apart from ... more

Eurofins acquires Diatherix Laboratories, Inc.

Eurofins Scientific  announces that it has signed an agreement to acquire Diatherix Laboratories, Inc. for approximately US$ 50m, plus an earn-out upon achievement of pre-defined revenue and profitability targets. Completion of the transaction is expected in the next 30 days and is subject ... more

Tracking Sperm

Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), a new imaging technique for in situ localization of spermatozoa, might improve the results of testicular sperm extraction while reducing traumata during surgery.In the middle of Europe nearly every sixth couple in the reproductive age is inv ... more

Biocartis and Fast-track diagnostics sign strategic collaboration in infectious diseases

Biocartis and Fast-track diagnostics announced that they have entered into a strategic collaboration to develop a range of multiplex infectious disease tests to run on the Biocartis Idylla™ system. Biocartis and Fast-track diagnostics plan to collaborate on a new approach to infectious dise ... more

All news on diagnostics

Thomas Bachmann is new Chief Executive Officer of the Eppendorf Group

Thomas Bachmann became Chief Executive Officer of the Eppendorf Group on August 1, 2015. Following the departure of Eppendorf's previous CEO, the company's Chief Financial Officer, Detmar Ammermann, had exercised the function of Spokesman of the Management Board on an interim basis in addit ... more

BioTek Instruments Receives 5x5x5 Growth Award for Technology

BioTek Instruments has been recognized as one of the 5x5x5 Growth Award winners for 2015. This annual award is sponsored by Vermont Business Magazine and KeyBank, and is presented to five Vermont businesses that have experienced the greatest growth over the past five years in five different ... more

Huntingdon Life Sciences and Harlan Laboratories announce new equity funding

Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS) and Harlan Laboratories, soon to be called Envigo, announced that a group of institutional investors has committed up to $125 million in a minority equity financing that can be used to fund future growth initiatives. Brian Cass, CEO, commented: “We recently an ... more

David Newble joins TTP Labtech as new managing director

TTP Labtech announced the appointment of David Newble as its new managing director. Dr. Jas Sangera, founder, managing director and key driver for the company for the last 14 years, will continue his role as the company’s chairman.David Newble has a proven track record of growing life scien ... more

BIOTECHNICA and LABVOLUTION: Biologization and digitalization are top themes

Two trade shows, one ticket: For the first time, Deutsche Messe is staging BIOTECHNICA (6 to 8 October 2015) in conjunction with the new LABVOLUTION in order to attract an even wider industry audience to Hannover. While BIOTECHNICA is a showcase for mainstream biotechnology and the life sci ... more

Danaher To Acquire Pall Corporation

Danaher Corporation announced that it has entered into a definitive merger agreement with Pall Corporation pursuant to which Danaher will acquire all of the outstanding shares of Pall for $127.20 per share in cash, or a total enterprise value of approximately $13.8 billion, including assume ... more

SYGNIS signs non-exclusive distribution agreement with Cambridge Bioscience Ltd. for UK and Ireland

SYGNIS AG announced a distribution agreement with Cambridge Bioscience for the commercialization of SYGNIS’ proprietary product portfolio in the UK and Ireland.Under the terms of the agreement, Cambridge Bioscience will promote, market, sell and support TruePrime™ products for primer-free W ... more

Sartorius Starts Off Fiscal 2015 with a Strong First Quarter

Sartorius started off fiscal 2015 with substantial double-digit gains in order intake, sales revenue and earnings. Group order intake rose 13.1%, excluding currency effects; this reported figure surged 22.7%. Sales climbed 17.2% in constant currencies; the reported figure, 27.0%. Operating ... more

Genevac Consolidate Evaporator & Freeze Dryer Operations In Germany

Genevac has announced, as of 1st April 2015, that LMS Consult GmbH (LMS) has been appointed as the exclusive German distributor for its market leading evaporator systems plus the freeze dryer range of its parent company - SP Scientific.For over 30 years - LMS Consulthave successfully sold a ... more

Ximbio Expands Team

Ximbio announced the expansion of its team, with two new appointments. Dr Hugh Spotswood has joined as Senior Business Manager, and Emily Haggerty as a Scientific Portfolio Associate. Hugh’s role as part of Ximbio is to head up the business development function to maximise the revenue creat ... more

All news on lab technology

Opioid receptor gene variations associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome severity

A study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) indicates that variations in opioid receptor genes are associated with more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in newborn babies. The findings, published in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, could help lead to the development of indi ... more

Humans carry more antibiotic-resistant bacteria than animals they work with

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a concern for the health and well-being of both humans and farm animals. One of the most common and costly diseases faced by the dairy industry is bovine mastitis, a potentially fatal bacterial inflammation of the mammary gland (IMI). Widespread use of anti ... more

Generic heart medication shown to prolong ovarian cancer patients' survival

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers demonstrate a benefit in overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients receiving generic heart medications known as beta-blockers. Survival was shown to be greatest among those prescribed first-generation nonselective beta-blockers ... more

New drug protects against the deadly effects of nuclear radiation 24 hours after exposure

An interdisciplinary research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reports a new breakthrough in countering the deadly effects of radiation exposure. A single injection of a regenerative peptide was shown to significantly increase survival in mice when given 24 ho ... more

Chestnut leaves yield extract that disarms deadly staph bacteria

A study showed the ability of a chestnut leaf extract to block Staphlococcus aureus virulence and pathogenesis without detectable resistance. The use of chestnut leaves in traditional folk remedies inspired the research, led by Cassandra Quave, an ethnobotanist at Emory University. "We've i ... more

A paradigm shift in multidrug resistance

Bacteria are pretty wily creatures. Take for example, an organism such as Salmonella, which are killed by antibiotics in lab tests, but can become highly resistant in the body. It is an example of what UC Santa Barbara biologist Michael Mahan refers to as the Trojan horse strategy. Identifi ... more

Scientists successfully test MERS vaccine in monkeys and camels

National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and colleagues report that an experimental vaccine given six weeks before exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) fully protects rhesus macaques from disease. The vaccine also generated potentially protective MERS-Co ... more

Scientists report success using zebrafish embryos to identify potential new diabetes drugs

In experiments with 500,000 genetically engineered zebrafish embryos, Johns Hopkins scientists report they have developed a potentially better and more accurate way to screen for useful drugs, and they have used it to identify 24 drug candidates that increase the number of insulin-producing ... more

Bilcare Research AG announces acquisition of a new site in Singapore

Bilcare Research AG announces the acquisition of a manufacturing location for high barrier films for the pharmaceutical industry in Singapore. The new member of the group will operate under the name of Bilcare Research Singapore Pte. Ltd. “The new facility and additional capacity combined w ... more

Invion completes clinical trial of INV103 (ALA-CPN10) in lupus patients

Invion Limited has completed its Phase II clinical trial entitled “Double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled study to investigate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and biochemical activity of intravenous Cpn10 administration in subjects with SLE (NCT01838694)”.The Company’s d ... more

All news on pharma

Low-level arsenic exposure before birth associated with early puberty and obesity

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. The finding is significant because the exposure level of 10 parts per bi ... more

New optical method promises faster, more accurate diagnosis of breast cancer

A new optical method for more quickly and accurately determining whether breast tissue lesions are cancerous is described by University of Illinois researchers. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Chicago researchers Hassaan Majeed, Mikhail Kandel, Kevin Han, Zelun Luo, Virgilia ... more

Cellular contamination pathway for plutonium, other heavy elements, identified

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have reported an advance in understanding the biological chemistry of radioactive metals, opening up new avenues of research into strategies for remedial action in the event of possible human exposure to nuclear contaminants. Research led ... more

Holocaust survivors pass on trauma to their children’s genes

An international team lead by Rachel Yehuda, professor at Mount Sinai hospital in New York, and for the molecular analyses Elisabeth Binder, director at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, studied the genes of 32 Jewish individuals who had been held in concentration camps, exp ... more

Flu remedies help combat E. coli bacteria

If the intestinal bacteria level becomes unbalanced, it can cause diseases. Physiologists from the University of Zurich reveal how a specific carbohydrate in the intestinal mucosa heavily multiplies certain E. coli bacteria and thus causes inflammations. These could be treated with flu reme ... more

Opioid receptor gene variations associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome severity

A study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) indicates that variations in opioid receptor genes are associated with more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in newborn babies. The findings, published in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, could help lead to the development of indi ... more

Glitter from silver lights up Alzheimer's dark secrets

Scientists have caught a glimpse of the elusive toxic form of the Alzheimer's molecule, during its attempt to bore into the outer covering of a cell decoy, using a new method involving laser light and fat-coated silver nano-particles. While the origin of Alzheimer's Disease, one that robs t ... more

Injectable cryogel-based whole-cell cancer vaccines

Research led by Wyss Core Faculty member David Mooney, Ph.D., in collaboration with researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute could potentially yield a new platform for cancer vaccines. Leveraging a biologically inspired sponge-like gel called "cryogel" as an injectable biomaterial, t ... more

Relapse, poor survival in leukemia linked to genetic mutations that persist in remission

For patients with an often-deadly form of leukemia, new research suggests that lingering cancer-related mutations - detected after initial treatment with chemotherapy - are associated with an increased risk of relapse and poor survival. Using genetic profiling to study bone marrow samples f ... more

FSU researcher identifies protein with promise for cancer therapy

In the second part of his lab's recent one-two punch, Florida State University researcher Daniel Kaplan said he has solved a cell division mystery in a way that will intrigue the makers of cancer-fighting drugs. The key, said Kaplan, a College of Medicine Department of Biomedical Sciences r ... more

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