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Genomic sequencing reveals mutations, insights into 2014 Ebola outbreak

In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute and Harvard University, in collaboration with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation and researchers across institutions and continents, ... more

New analysis of old HIV vaccines finds potentially protective immune response

Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was pre ... more

Yale study identifies possible bacterial drivers of IBD

Yale University researchers have identified a handful of bacterial culprits that may drive inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, using patients' own intestinal immune responses as a guide. The findings are published Aug. 28 in the journal Cell. Tr ... more

Marijuana compound may offer treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. Findings from the experiments, using a cellular model of Al ... more

Merck Serono Announces Groundbreaking of New Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility in China

Merck Serono held the groundbreaking ceremony for its new pharmaceutical manufacturing facility in Nantong, China. The new facility, which will be the Group’s second-largest pharmaceutical manufacturing facility worldwide, will focus on the bulk production and packaging of Glucophage®, Conc ... more

Polyethylene-containing microplastic particles: health risk resulting from the use of skin cleansing and dental care products is unlikely

Some cosmetic products such as peelings, shower gels and toothpastes are promoted as having an especially gentle cleansing effect on the skin or teeth. For this purpose, such products may contain microplastic particles which usually consist of polyethylene (PE) and are between 0.1 and 1 mil ... more

Fighting prostate cancer with a tomato-rich diet

Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 per cent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests. With 35,000 new cases every year in the UK, and around 10,000 deaths, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Rates are higher in d ... more

Potential therapy for the Sudan strain of Ebola could help contain some future outbreaks

Ebola is a rare, but deadly disease that exists as five strains, none of which have approved therapies. One of the most lethal strains is the Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Although not the strain currently devastating West Africa, SUDV has caused widespread illness, even as recently as 2012. In ... more

New Research Method Opens Door to Therapy with Human Muscle Stem Cells

Stem cells are essential for the repair of muscle damage, but all attempts to manipulate human muscle stem cells for therapy have thus far failed. Now Dr. Andreas Marg and Prof. Simone Spuler of the Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), a joint cooperation between the Max Delbrü ... more

Cenix BioScience and Metanomics Health sign research agreement

Cenix BioScience GmbH announced that it has signed a research framework agreement with Metanomics Health GmbH, a BASF Group company, focused on comprehensive metabolite profiling services and the development of metabolomic biomarkers.  As the agreement’s first work assignment, Metanomics He ... more

All news

Is the Ebola Virus a Real Threat for Europe and the US?

“The Zaire Ebola virus causes a highly contagious and lethal hemorrhagic fever leading to the death of the infected individuals. The recent outbreak of the virus in West Africa has alarmed the world, especially Europe and the US, owing to the geographical speed of the infection spread and h ... more

Malvern Instruments completes acquisitions

Malvern Instruments Ltd has announced that it has completed the acquisition of MicroCal from GE Healthcare Life Sciences and has also purchased the Archimedes particle characterization system from Affinity Biosensors LLC (Santa Barbara, CA). Both of these developments extend Malvern’s portf ... more

QIAGEN adds promising genomic biomarkers to pipeline

QIAGEN N.V. announced it has acquired an exclusive global license to the biomarker SF3B1 from the University of Tokyo. SF3B1 is believed to play a critical role in the prognosis of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a group of hematological cancers in which bone marrow does not ... more

Zenith Epigenetics Appoints Julie Cherrington as President and CEO

Zenith Epigenetics Corp. announced that it has appointed Julie Cherrington PhD to act as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Zenith Epigenetics Corp. Julie has an extensive background leading companies focused on the discovery and development of novel cancer therapeutics and is wel ... more

GENALICE and deCODE Genetics enter into a partnership for population wide genomic analysis

GENALICE announced it is partnering with deCODE Genetics to facilitate the large-scale testing of its unique DNA data processing software solution, GENALICE MAP. After a first successful round of evaluating GENALICE MAP on speed and quality, both parties agreed to extend the evaluation to i ... more

Ötzi’s “non-human” DNA

Ötzi’s human genome was decoded from a hip bone sample taken from the 5,300 year old mummy. However the tiny sample weighing no more than 0.1 g provides so much more information. A team of scientists from EURAC in Bolzano/Bozen together with colleagues from the University of Vienna successf ... more

Pseudogenes may provide clearer understanding of biomarkers

Alas, the thankless pseudogene. Dysfunctional, unloved and seemingly of little use, these poor-cousin relatives of genes have lost their protein-coding abilities. They contain material not essential for an organism's survival and are the "last stop" for removal of genomic waste. Not any mor ... more

Identifying microbial species

Millions of microbial species populate the world, but so far only a few have been identified due to the inability of most microbes to grow in the laboratory. Edgar Goluch, an engineer, and Slava Epstein, a biologist, aim to change this. The pair, both researchers at Northeastern University, ... more

Prototype electrolyte sensor to provide immediate read-outs

Patients trying to navigate today's complex medical system with its costly laboratory analyses might prefer a pain-free home diagnostic device, worn on the wrist, that can analyze, continuously record and immediately remedy low electrolyte levels.Runners, athletes in other strenuous sports ... more

Agilent Technologies Thought Leader Award Supports Dr. Carolyn Mountford

Agilent Technologies Inc. announced that Dr. Carolyn Mountford has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award in recognition of her work using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy technology in cancer research.Dr. Mountford is a professor of radiology at The University of Newcastle A ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Cenix BioScience and Metanomics Health sign research agreement

Cenix BioScience GmbH announced that it has signed a research framework agreement with Metanomics Health GmbH, a BASF Group company, focused on comprehensive metabolite profiling services and the development of metabolomic biomarkers.  As the agreement’s first work assignment, Metanomics He ... more

Miriam Monge to Join Sartorius Stedim Biotech as Director

Sartorius Stedim Biotech (SSB) announced the appointment of Miriam Monge as Director of Marketing for SSB’s Integrated Solutions unit. In this newly created position, Monge will focus on sharpening SSB’s profile as an integrated solution provider for the biopharmaceutical industry. Miriam M ... more

Removing programming material after inducing stem cells could improve their regeneration ability

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have great potential in the field of regenerative medicine because they can be coaxed to turn into specific cells; however, the new cells don’t always act as anticipated. They sometimes mutate, develop into tumors or produce other negative side ... more

Messe München International takes over one of India's leading trade fairs for laboratory technology

Messe München International is strengthening its portfolio of events in the future market of India by taking over India Lab Expo, one of the leading trade fairs for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology on the Indian subcontinent. For the first time ever, this year's India Lab E ... more

Researchers block plant hormone

Researchers trying to get new information about the metabolism of plants can switch off individual genes and study the resulting changes. However, Erich Kombrink from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne and Markus Kaiser from the University of Duisburg-Essen adop ... more

Efficient production of hydrogen by algae

Microalgae need only sunlight and water for the production of hydrogen. However, in order to make hydrogen production by microalgae economically feasible their efficiency has to be increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude. In the current issue of Energy and Environmental Science scientists from ... more

Miltenyi Biotec acquires gene therapy assets from Lentigen Corporation

Miltenyi Biotec announced that it has acquired the lentiviral vector manufacturing business and related assets from US company Lentigen Corporation, a global leader in lentiviral technology for cell and gene therapy applications. The acquisition further strengthens Miltenyi Biotec’s portfol ... more

Reprocell acquires Reinnervate and BioServe

Reinnervate Ltd has been acquired by Reprocell of Shin-Yokohama in Japan. Reprocell, a pioneer in the field of induced pluripotent stem cell biology supplies iPSC-dervided Hepatocytes, Neurons and Cardiomyocytes as well as a range of media and reagents for stem cell culture. Reprocell inten ... more

Stem cells from nerves form teeth

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that stem cells inside the soft tissues of the tooth come from an unexpected source, namely nerves. These findings are now being published in the journal Nature and contribute to brand new knowledge of how teeth are formed, how ... more

Genetics of cancer: Non-coding DNA can finally be decoded

Cancer is a disease of the genome resulting from a combination of genetic modifications (or mutations). We inherit from our parents strong or weak predispositions to developing certain kinds of cancer; in addition, we also accumulate new mutations in our cells throughout our lifetime. Altho ... more

All news on biotechnology

Predemtec GmbH receives seed financing for developing a blood test to diagnose Alzheimer`s Disease

Predemtec GmbH develops a blood test for a reliable diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. In July 2014 the start-up received a seed financing from High-Tech Gruenderfonds (HTGF). The seed investment will be used to finalize the first test into a marketable product and to expand the scope of the ... more

QIAGEN adds promising genomic biomarkers to pipeline

QIAGEN N.V. announced it has acquired an exclusive global license to the biomarker SF3B1 from the University of Tokyo. SF3B1 is believed to play a critical role in the prognosis of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a group of hematological cancers in which bone marrow does not ... more

Implandata Announces Successful Implantation of Micro-Sensor for Intraocular Pressure Measurement in Glaucoma Patient

Implandata Ophthalmic Products GmbH reports the successful implantation of the first patient within the ARGOS-02 clinical study at Augenklinik Bellevue in Kiel, Germany.  In the ARGOS-02 clinical study, six eye centers in Germany are currently recruiting primary open angle glaucoma patients ... more

Dangers of desert dust: New diagnostic tool for valley fever

On July 5, 2011, a massive wall of dust, ("haboob," in Arabic), blanketed Phoenix, Arizona, creating an awesome spectacle, (or stubborn nuisance, depending on your perspective). Dust storms are a common occurrence in the arid desert environments of the American Southwest. But windborne dust ... more

New blood test identifies risk “Sudden Cardiac Death”

UAntwerp (University of Antwerp), UZA (Antwerp University Hospital), and Multiplicom NV together developed a blood test to determine the genetic risk of “Sudden Cardiac Death” (SCD). This test, called PED MASTR, is already in use at the center of medical genetics of UZA/UAntwerp and will be ... more

Merck to Collaborate with Sysmex Inostics on a Blood-Based RAS Biomarker Test

Merck announced that the company has signed an agreement to collaborate with Sysmex Inostics GmbH for the development and commercialization of a blood-based RAS biomarker test for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Blood-based biomarker testing is a faster and easier approac ... more

Studies Validate EKF Diagnostics’ Early Stage Test for Progressive Diabetic Kidney Disease

EKF Diagnostics confirmed the growing weight of independent scientific evidence as validation that soluble TNF Receptors 1 and 2 are strong biomarkers of progressive Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). EKF affirms that the markers can be reliably used as diagnostic tests to predict end-stage ren ... more

Research that more than meets the eye

The link between blood flow in the retina and the development of glaucoma can now be measured accurately for the first time. This was made possible by the further development of an established measurement method, optical coherence tomography (OCT), which enables the visual assessment of the ... more

Research combines graphene and painkiller receptor

Almost every biological process involves sensing the presence of a certain chemical. Finely tuned over millions of years of evolution, the body’s different receptors are shaped to accept certain target chemicals. When they bind, the receptors tell their host cells to produce nerve impulses, ... more

Exact outline of melanoma could lead to new diagnostic tools

Researchers at Oregon State University have identified a specific biochemical process that can cause normal and healthy skin cells to transform into cancerous melanoma cells, which should help predict melanoma vulnerability and could also lead to future therapies. More than 70,000 cases of ... more

All news on diagnostics

Messe München International takes over one of India's leading trade fairs for laboratory technology

Messe München International is strengthening its portfolio of events in the future market of India by taking over India Lab Expo, one of the leading trade fairs for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology on the Indian subcontinent. For the first time ever, this year's India Lab E ... more

Bochem Increasingly Using New Media

Bochem Instrumente GmbH presents sections of its overall product spectrum in various new videos. The recently finished productions provide a compact overview of the product groups of lab jacks, electrical lifts, containers as well as stands and clamps. They can be found on the company’s web ... more

Merger of CyBio AG into Analytik Jena AG Completed

The merger of CyBio AG into Analytik Jena AG became effective upon entry into the commercial register of Analytik Jena AG (commercial register of the Registry Court of Jena, HRB 200027). As a result, CyBio AG is dissolved as an independent company. In the future, the Life Science business u ... more

LABVOLUTION – the new lab technology show in Hannover

Deutsche Messe is launching LABVOLUTION, a new trade fair to be staged every two years as amajor platform for the world of lab technology and equipment. LABVOLUTIONmakes its debut from 6 to 8 October 2015 at the Hannover Exhibition Center in Hannover, Germany, where it will take place every ... more

Automating Laboratory-On-A-Chip To Cut Healthcare Costs

A research team at the University of California, Riverside has created a computer programming language that will automate “laboratory-on-a-chip” technologies used in DNA sequencing, drug discovery, virus detection and other biomedical applications.“If you think of the beginning of computers ... more

Reorganization of the Executive Board of Eppendorf AG

The Executive Board of Eppendorf AG is reshaping in order to be optimally equipped to meet the future demands of the market. Dr. Dirk Ehlers, Chairman of the Executive Board of the Eppendorf Group, will leave the company by mutual agreement. Detmar Ammermann (Chief Financial Officer) will r ... more

New microscope sees what others can't

Microscopes don't exactly lie, but their limitations affect the truths they can tell. For example, scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) simply can't see materials that don't conduct electricity very well, and their high energies can actually damage some types of samples. In an effort to ext ... more

A lab in your pocket

When you get sick, your physician may take a sample of your blood, send it to the lab and wait for results. In the near future, however, doctors may be able to run those tests almost instantly on a piece of plastic about the size of credit card. These labs-on-a-chip would not only be quick— ... more

Sartorius with Gains

Sartorius got off to a good start in fiscal 2014, with gains in order intake and sales revenue. In constant currencies, Group sales revenue rose 6.3% and order intake increased 4.9%. Despite negative currency impacts, operating Profit for the Group also grew 2.0%; its respective margin afte ... more

Turning smart phones into microscopes

Australian scientists have invented a simple and cheap way of making a high-powered lens that can transform a smart phone into a high-resolution microscope. Costing less than a cent, the lenses promise a revolution in science and medicine in developing countries and remote areas. The lens f ... more

All news on lab technology

Merck Serono Announces Groundbreaking of New Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility in China

Merck Serono held the groundbreaking ceremony for its new pharmaceutical manufacturing facility in Nantong, China. The new facility, which will be the Group’s second-largest pharmaceutical manufacturing facility worldwide, will focus on the bulk production and packaging of Glucophage®, Conc ... more

Janssen Affiliate Cilag GmbH International Acquires Covagen AG

Cilag GmbH International, an affiliate of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, announced that it has acquired Covagen AG, a privately-held, biopharmaceutical company specializing in the development of multispecific protein therapeutics through the FynomAb® technology p ... more

Evotec and Medicines For Malaria Venture announce a long-term compound management collaboration

Evotec AG announced the start of a multi-year compound management agreement between Evotec (US) Inc. and Medicines for Malaria Venture ("MMV") in support of MMV's Malaria and Pathogen Box initiatives. These two initiatives are expected to revolutionise the field of drug discovery for malari ... more

Merck Reports Organic Growth in all Four Businesses in Second Quarter

Merck generated organic sales growth of 3.4% in the second quarter of 2014. In addition, the company reported an acquisition-related sales increase of 3.0%, which was countered by negative foreign exchange effects of -4.5%. Overall, sales thus increased moderately by € 52 million or 1.9% to ... more

Where scientists from abroad want to conduct research

The universities in the major conurbations Berlin and Munich are in particular demand among foreign researchers according to the Humboldt Rankings released today. The ranking list shows how many researchers have come to Germany on a fellowship from the Humboldt Foundation in the last five y ... more

Assessment of pain and suffering in test animals

New rules in the European Union (EU) for the protection of laboratory animals require assessment of pain that these animals may experience during scientific experiments. The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) published an article in the science magazine "Nature" about the national ... more

EU approves Roche’s Avastin for platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer

Roche announced that the European Commission (EU) approved the use of Avastin (bevacizumab) in combination with paclitaxel, topotecan, or pegylated liposomal doxorubicin chemotherapy as a treatment for women with recurrent ovarian cancer that is resistant to platinum-containing chemotherapy ... more

Roche to acquire Santaris Pharma

Roche announced that it has agreed to acquire Santaris Pharma. Santaris Pharma has pioneered its proprietary Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) platform that has contributed to an emerging era of RNA-targeting therapeutics. This new class of medicines has the potential to address difficult to treat ... more

Galapagos receives milestone in osteoarthritis alliance with Servier

Galapagos NV announced the achievement of a second partial milestone, thereby completing the nomination of a new pre-clinical candidate in the osteoarthritis alliance with Servier. On March 7, Galapagos announced the receipt of €2M as the first partial milestone. Today's payment remains und ... more

A Treatment Revolution is Underway: All-Oral Therapies Transform Global Hepatitis C Antiviral Market

Drug development for hepatitis C virus (HCV) antivirals has amplified with rising incidence rates and the intense need for curative therapy in the absence of a preventative vaccine. Change is underway as the market moves away from protease inhibitors and interferon regimens towards highly e ... more

All news on pharma

Genomic sequencing reveals mutations, insights into 2014 Ebola outbreak

In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute and Harvard University, in collaboration with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation and researchers across institutions and continents, ... more

New analysis of old HIV vaccines finds potentially protective immune response

Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was pre ... more

Marijuana compound may offer treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. Findings from the experiments, using a cellular model of Al ... more

Polyethylene-containing microplastic particles: health risk resulting from the use of skin cleansing and dental care products is unlikely

Some cosmetic products such as peelings, shower gels and toothpastes are promoted as having an especially gentle cleansing effect on the skin or teeth. For this purpose, such products may contain microplastic particles which usually consist of polyethylene (PE) and are between 0.1 and 1 mil ... more

Fighting prostate cancer with a tomato-rich diet

Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 per cent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests. With 35,000 new cases every year in the UK, and around 10,000 deaths, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Rates are higher in d ... more

Potential therapy for the Sudan strain of Ebola could help contain some future outbreaks

Ebola is a rare, but deadly disease that exists as five strains, none of which have approved therapies. One of the most lethal strains is the Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Although not the strain currently devastating West Africa, SUDV has caused widespread illness, even as recently as 2012. In ... more

New Research Method Opens Door to Therapy with Human Muscle Stem Cells

Stem cells are essential for the repair of muscle damage, but all attempts to manipulate human muscle stem cells for therapy have thus far failed. Now Dr. Andreas Marg and Prof. Simone Spuler of the Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), a joint cooperation between the Max Delbrü ... more

Potential therapy for incurable Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most common inherited disease affecting the peripheral nervous system. Researchers from the Department of Neurogenetics at the Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine and University Medical Centre Göttingen have discovered that the maturity o ... more

Scientific Paradox: Phosphate Increases The Concentration of Sodium (!) in The Blood

A previously undiscovered role played by the hormone FGF23 has now been discovered in a project funded by the FWF. Scientists were already aware that greater quantities of this hormone are produced when there is too much phosphate in the blood plasma and that it reduces the absorption of th ... more

Cancer leaves a common fingerprint on DNA

Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study published online in Genome Medicine on Aug. 26, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive c ... more

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