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Metrohm USA opens its new headquarters in Florida

“Metrohm’s dedication to the people that use our instruments and those who support them make us who we are as a company. This new facility demonstrates our commitments as we invest in providing our customers with innovative training facilities and our employees with modern and collaborative ... more

How the MRSA bacterium handles stress

An international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results eventually can be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms. ... more

New treatment target for melanoma identified

Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, ... more

Key player in cell metabolism identified

Researchers from the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have identified a key role for EXD2 in protein production in the mitochondria, the cellular organelles responsible for the majority of energy generation. "We have provided ... more

A bendable touch panel with silver nano ink printing

JST has recognized the results of NexTEP's project, "A Sensor Film for Touch Panels Using Thin Metallic Wire" as a success.This development task was based on the research of Professor Tatsuo Hasegawa, Principal Research Manager at the Flexible Electronics Research Center of the National Ins ... more

Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterials

Immunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body's immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenti ... more

Analysis shows lack of evidence that wearable biosensors improve patient outcomes

Wearable biosensors have grown increasingly popular as many people use them in wristbands or watches to count steps or track sleep. But there is not enough proof that these devices are improving patient outcomes such as weight or blood pressure, according to a study by Cedars-Sinai investig ... more

neotiv secures seed funding from High-Tech Gründerfonds

From basic research straight to a digital medical product: this vision has been turned into reality by neotiv. The team headed by Chief Executive Officer Dr. Chris Rehse and dementia researcher Prof. Emrah Düzel develops user-friendly apps that are able to measure the psychological effects ... more

Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered

Nitrogen-fixing bacteria are the chief means by which nitrogen gas in the air is changed into a form that plants and animals can use. Roughly 10 percent of these nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to ... more

The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

Discovery could pave the way to new diagnostic tools

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics. Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecule ... more

All news

New treatment target for melanoma identified

Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, ... more

Key player in cell metabolism identified

Researchers from the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have identified a key role for EXD2 in protein production in the mitochondria, the cellular organelles responsible for the majority of energy generation. "We have provided ... more

A bendable touch panel with silver nano ink printing

JST has recognized the results of NexTEP's project, "A Sensor Film for Touch Panels Using Thin Metallic Wire" as a success.This development task was based on the research of Professor Tatsuo Hasegawa, Principal Research Manager at the Flexible Electronics Research Center of the National Ins ... more

First 3-D structure of DHHC enzymes reported

The first three-dimensional structure of DHHC proteins--enzymes involved in many cellular processes, including cancer--explains how they function and may offer a blueprint for designing therapeutic drugs. Researchers have proposed blocking DHHC activity to boost the effectiveness of first-l ... more

Immune cells that keep gut fungi under control

Immune cells that process food and bacterial antigens in the intestines control the intestinal population of fungi, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists. Defects in the fungus-fighting abilities of these cells may contribute to some cases of Crohn's disease and ot ... more

Enzyme shown to regulate inflammation and metabolism in fat tissue

The human body has two primary kinds of fat--white fat, which stores excess calories and is associated with obesity, and brown fat, which burns calories in order to produce heat and has garnered interest as a potential means of combating obesity. Now, a study led by Brown University researc ... more

How do we taste sugar, bacon and coffee?

A new chemical pathway that helps the brain detect sweet, savory and bitter flavors

How do we taste the sugary richness of candy, or the bitter undertones of coffee? What about the savory flavors of smoked and cured meats? Until now, many scientists believed that a single protein -- TRPM5 -- acted as a gatekeeper for tasting these delectable foods. Remove TRPM5 from a pers ... more

How good bacteria control your genes

Scientists from the Babraham Institute near Cambridge in collaboration with colleagues from Brazil (here and here) and Italy have discovered a way that good bacteria in the gut can control genes in our cells. The work shows that chemical messages from bacteria can change the location of key ... more

Solid-state physics offers insights into dielectric properties of biomaterials

A team of Russian, Czech and German researchers gained a new perspective on the properties of three materials of biological origin. Besides two reference materials with well-studied properties -- serum albumin and cytochrome C -- the researchers looked at the extracellular matrix of the She ... more

New Biomarkers Predict Outcome of Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the University of Zurich have identified biomarkers in the blood that make it possible to predict whether cancer patients will respond positively to immunotherapy. Patients for whom therapy does not work can thus be treated using different methods at an earlier stage. Nowaday ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Key player in cell metabolism identified

Researchers from the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have identified a key role for EXD2 in protein production in the mitochondria, the cellular organelles responsible for the majority of energy generation. "We have provided ... more

Bristol to lead revolutionary research into 'self-healing' materials

The Manufacturing Immortality Project is a three-year project, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), that will investigate the development of new materials made up of biological and non-biological parts which are capable of self-healing. Initially the pro ... more

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery from heart attack injury. The results are a step closer to the goa ... more

Scaling to new heights with gecko-inspired adhesive

Some animals, such as geckos, can easily climb up walls and across ceilings. But currently, no material exists that allows everyday people to scale walls or transverse ceilings as effortlessly. Now, scientists report a dry adhesive that could someday make it easier to defy gravity. Geckos ... more

Rare melanoma type highly responsive to immunotherapy

Desmoplastic melanoma is a rare subtype of melanoma that is commonly found on sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck, and usually seen in older patients. Treatment is difficult because these tumors are often resistant to chemotherapy and lack actionable mutations commonly found in oth ... more

Potential for a green energy economy based on hydrogen

First Characterization of a Sensory [FeFe] Hydrogenase

Hydrogenases are enzymes capable of making hydrogen gas (H2) using protons from water, a reaction with relevance to a potential future green energy economy based on H2. Bacteria containing these enzymes often produce H2 as a waste product during sugar metabolism in the absence of oxygen. M ... more

Nanoscale virus delivers peptide drugs to cells, tissues

By chipping away at a viral protein, Rice University scientists have discovered a path toward virus-like, nanoscale devices that may be able to deliver drugs to cells. The protein is one of three that make up the protective shell, called the capsid, of natural adeno-associated viruses (AAV) ... more

How good bacteria control your genes

Scientists from the Babraham Institute near Cambridge in collaboration with colleagues from Brazil (here and here) and Italy have discovered a way that good bacteria in the gut can control genes in our cells. The work shows that chemical messages from bacteria can change the location of key ... more

Solid-state physics offers insights into dielectric properties of biomaterials

A team of Russian, Czech and German researchers gained a new perspective on the properties of three materials of biological origin. Besides two reference materials with well-studied properties -- serum albumin and cytochrome C -- the researchers looked at the extracellular matrix of the She ... more

Super-silenced DNA hints at new ways to reprogram cells

Newly described stretches of super-silenced DNA reveal a fresh approach to reprogram cell identity to use in regenerative medicine studies and one day in the clinic, according to a study by investigators from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "In the past, m ... more

All news on biotechnology

Key player in cell metabolism identified

Researchers from the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have identified a key role for EXD2 in protein production in the mitochondria, the cellular organelles responsible for the majority of energy generation. "We have provided ... more

Analysis shows lack of evidence that wearable biosensors improve patient outcomes

Wearable biosensors have grown increasingly popular as many people use them in wristbands or watches to count steps or track sleep. But there is not enough proof that these devices are improving patient outcomes such as weight or blood pressure, according to a study by Cedars-Sinai investig ... more

neotiv secures seed funding from High-Tech Gründerfonds

From basic research straight to a digital medical product: this vision has been turned into reality by neotiv. The team headed by Chief Executive Officer Dr. Chris Rehse and dementia researcher Prof. Emrah Düzel develops user-friendly apps that are able to measure the psychological effects ... more

The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

Discovery could pave the way to new diagnostic tools

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics. Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecule ... more

Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired robotics

UCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics. The simple body design of stin ... more

First 3-D structure of DHHC enzymes reported

The first three-dimensional structure of DHHC proteins--enzymes involved in many cellular processes, including cancer--explains how they function and may offer a blueprint for designing therapeutic drugs. Researchers have proposed blocking DHHC activity to boost the effectiveness of first-l ... more

PET tracer can measure damage from multiple sclerosis in mouse models

The loss or damage of myelin, a cellular sheath that surrounds and insulates nerves, is the hallmark of the immune-mediated neurological disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). When segments of this protective membrane are damaged, nerve impulses can be disrupted. Symptoms range from tingling and ... more

BIOCRATES Life Sciences AG Acquires Metanomics Health GmbH

BIOCRATES Life Sciences AG announced the acquisition of Metanomics Health GmbH. Metanomics Health is a metabolomics biomarker development and healthcare services specialist based in Berlin, Germany. At the same time, the company is closing a significant financing round to support future gro ... more

Micro-spectrometer opens door to a wealth of new smartphone functions

Use your smartphone to check how clean the air is, whether food is fresh or a lump is malignant. This has all come a step closer thanks to a new spectrometer that is so small it can be incorporated easily and cheaply in a mobile phone. The little sensor developed at TU Eindhoven is just as ... more

Concept Life Sciences achieves record profits

Strengthens senior team

Concept Life Sciences (Concept), the integrated drug discovery, development and analytical services company, today announced a successful financial year, ending 2017 with revenues in excess of $65m/£49m. The Company also welcomes Dr Andrew Scott as Head of Bioassay Development and Screening ... more

All news on diagnostics

Metrohm USA opens its new headquarters in Florida

“Metrohm’s dedication to the people that use our instruments and those who support them make us who we are as a company. This new facility demonstrates our commitments as we invest in providing our customers with innovative training facilities and our employees with modern and collaborative ... more

A bendable touch panel with silver nano ink printing

JST has recognized the results of NexTEP's project, "A Sensor Film for Touch Panels Using Thin Metallic Wire" as a success.This development task was based on the research of Professor Tatsuo Hasegawa, Principal Research Manager at the Flexible Electronics Research Center of the National Ins ... more

Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired robotics

UCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics. The simple body design of stin ... more

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery from heart attack injury. The results are a step closer to the goa ... more

Scaling to new heights with gecko-inspired adhesive

Some animals, such as geckos, can easily climb up walls and across ceilings. But currently, no material exists that allows everyday people to scale walls or transverse ceilings as effortlessly. Now, scientists report a dry adhesive that could someday make it easier to defy gravity. Geckos ... more

Solid-state physics offers insights into dielectric properties of biomaterials

A team of Russian, Czech and German researchers gained a new perspective on the properties of three materials of biological origin. Besides two reference materials with well-studied properties -- serum albumin and cytochrome C -- the researchers looked at the extracellular matrix of the She ... more

Concept Life Sciences achieves record profits

Strengthens senior team

Concept Life Sciences (Concept), the integrated drug discovery, development and analytical services company, today announced a successful financial year, ending 2017 with revenues in excess of $65m/£49m. The Company also welcomes Dr Andrew Scott as Head of Bioassay Development and Screening ... more

Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has vi ... more

Channeling graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain ... more

Discngine raises €1.1 million in Series A funding round

Discngine, a software company specializing in applications for life sciences research, today announces a Series A financing round of €1.1 million ($1.3M), received from Extens Développement e-Santé. The funds raised will allow Discngine to move forward with its Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) ... more

All news on lab technology

Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterials

Immunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body's immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenti ... more

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world--creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines--and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limite ... more

PET tracer can measure damage from multiple sclerosis in mouse models

The loss or damage of myelin, a cellular sheath that surrounds and insulates nerves, is the hallmark of the immune-mediated neurological disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). When segments of this protective membrane are damaged, nerve impulses can be disrupted. Symptoms range from tingling and ... more

Rare melanoma type highly responsive to immunotherapy

Desmoplastic melanoma is a rare subtype of melanoma that is commonly found on sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck, and usually seen in older patients. Treatment is difficult because these tumors are often resistant to chemotherapy and lack actionable mutations commonly found in oth ... more

Alzheimer's drug turns back clock in powerhouse of cell

The experimental drug J147 is something of a modern elixir of life; it's been shown to treat Alzheimer's disease and reverse aging in mice and is almost ready for clinical trials in humans. Now, Salk scientists have solved the puzzle of what, exactly, J147 does. They report that the drug bi ... more

Nanoscale virus delivers peptide drugs to cells, tissues

By chipping away at a viral protein, Rice University scientists have discovered a path toward virus-like, nanoscale devices that may be able to deliver drugs to cells. The protein is one of three that make up the protective shell, called the capsid, of natural adeno-associated viruses (AAV) ... more

Evotec and APEIRON achieve first milestone in immuno-oncology alliance with Sanofi

Evotec AG and APEIRON Biologics AG announced that the companies received the first milestone payment from Sanofi under a 3-party alliance signed in August 2015. The milestone payment of EUR 3 m will be split equally between the two biotech companies. The success payment was triggered when t ... more

Alnylam and Sanofi enter into strategic restructuring

Optimizing development and commercialization of RNAi therapeutics for rare diseases

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi announced a strategic restructuring of their RNAi therapeutics alliance to streamline and optimize development and commercialization of certain products for the treatment of rare genetic diseases. Specifically, Alnylam will obtain global development ... more

Takeda announces its intention to acquire TiGenix

TiGenix NV confirms that Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited has announced its intention to launch a voluntary conditional takeover bid on TiGenix. Takeda intends to acquire 100% of the securities with voting rights or giving access to voting rights of TiGenix not already owned by Takeda ... more

Abzena takes on new facilities

Abzena plc enables the development and manufacture of biopharmaceutical products, provides an update on its UK and US facilities. In Cambridge, UK, the Group’s lease has commenced for 30,000 square feet of space in Building 900 on the Babraham Research Campus, as first announced in February ... more

All news on pharma

How the MRSA bacterium handles stress

An international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results eventually can be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms. ... more

New treatment target for melanoma identified

Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, ... more

Key player in cell metabolism identified

Researchers from the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have identified a key role for EXD2 in protein production in the mitochondria, the cellular organelles responsible for the majority of energy generation. "We have provided ... more

Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterials

Immunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body's immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenti ... more

Analysis shows lack of evidence that wearable biosensors improve patient outcomes

Wearable biosensors have grown increasingly popular as many people use them in wristbands or watches to count steps or track sleep. But there is not enough proof that these devices are improving patient outcomes such as weight or blood pressure, according to a study by Cedars-Sinai investig ... more

neotiv secures seed funding from High-Tech Gründerfonds

From basic research straight to a digital medical product: this vision has been turned into reality by neotiv. The team headed by Chief Executive Officer Dr. Chris Rehse and dementia researcher Prof. Emrah Düzel develops user-friendly apps that are able to measure the psychological effects ... more

The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

Discovery could pave the way to new diagnostic tools

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics. Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecule ... more

Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in guts

Regular surfers and bodyboarders are three times more likely to have antibiotic resistant E. coli in their guts than non-surfers, new research has revealed. Conducted by the University of Exeter, the Beach Bums study asked 300 people, half of whom regularly surf the UK's coastline, to take ... more

Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired robotics

UCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics. The simple body design of stin ... more

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world--creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines--and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limite ... more

All news on healthcare
News by department
  • Products

    Evotec and APEIRON achieve first milestone in immuno-oncology alliance with Sanofi

    Evotec AG and APEIRON Biologics AG announced that the companies received the first milestone payment from Sanofi under a 3-party alliance signed in August 2015. The milestone payment of EUR 3 m will be split equally between the two biotech companies. The success payment was triggered when t ... more

    Alligator Bioscience to Receive USD 6 Million Milestone Payment from Janssen

    Alligator Bioscience announced that a development milestone payment of USD 6 million has been triggered under the partnership agreement for ADC-1013 (JNJ-64457107) with Janssen Biotech, Inc. The milestone payment is for the partnership agreement to initiate a clinical combination study of A ... more

    Singapore’s IP Office to Grant Merck’s Patent Application for CRISPR Technology

    Merck announced that the Intellectual Property Office of Singapore has issued a “Notice of Eligibility for Grant” for Merck’s patent application covering the company’s CRISPR technology used in a genomic-integration method for eukaryotic cells. "Singapore’s notice of patent allowance for Me ... more

  • Business

    Alnylam and Sanofi enter into strategic restructuring

    Optimizing development and commercialization of RNAi therapeutics for rare diseases

    Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi announced a strategic restructuring of their RNAi therapeutics alliance to streamline and optimize development and commercialization of certain products for the treatment of rare genetic diseases. Specifically, Alnylam will obtain global development ... more

    Takeda announces its intention to acquire TiGenix

    TiGenix NV confirms that Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited has announced its intention to launch a voluntary conditional takeover bid on TiGenix. Takeda intends to acquire 100% of the securities with voting rights or giving access to voting rights of TiGenix not already owned by Takeda ... more

    Abzena takes on new facilities

    Abzena plc enables the development and manufacture of biopharmaceutical products, provides an update on its UK and US facilities. In Cambridge, UK, the Group’s lease has commenced for 30,000 square feet of space in Building 900 on the Babraham Research Campus, as first announced in February ... more

  • Price Development

    Drug costs vary by more than 600% in study of 10 high-income countries

    In a study of 10 high-income countries with universal health care, costs for prescription drugs in 6 of the largest categories of primary care medicines varied by more than 600%. All countries except Canada offered universal coverage of outpatient prescription drugs. The study looked at dat ... more

    Cell Medica granted Orphan Drug designation for novel cellular therapy

    Cell Medica announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Orphan Drug Designation to the company’s cancer immunotherapy treatment, referred to as CMD-003, under development for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) positive non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Additionally, the company announ ... more

    BASF increases prices for Vitamin E and A feed grade

    BASF increases prices for Vitamin E and A products for animal nutrition globally and with immediate effect. Prices will increase by 15% for all Vitamin E products and by 10% for all Vitamin A products. Existing contractual obligations with customers will be honored. more

  • Research

    Metrohm USA opens its new headquarters in Florida

    “Metrohm’s dedication to the people that use our instruments and those who support them make us who we are as a company. This new facility demonstrates our commitments as we invest in providing our customers with innovative training facilities and our employees with modern and collaborative ... more

    How the MRSA bacterium handles stress

    An international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results eventually can be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms. ... more

    New treatment target for melanoma identified

    Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, ... more

  • People

    Concept Life Sciences achieves record profits

    Strengthens senior team

    Concept Life Sciences (Concept), the integrated drug discovery, development and analytical services company, today announced a successful financial year, ending 2017 with revenues in excess of $65m/£49m. The Company also welcomes Dr Andrew Scott as Head of Bioassay Development and Screening ... more

    Proteros names Dave Lemus as new executive board member

    Proteros biostructures GmbH announced that the Company’s Supervisory board had appointed Dave Lemus, previously a non-executive director at Proteros, as Executive Vice Chairman, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Proteros Biostructures GmbH. Additionally, he will serve i ... more

    Breakthrough Prize for Kim Nasmyth

    Kim Nasmyth, emeritus director of the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna, receives one of five 2018 Breakthrough Prizes in Life Sciences for his work on chromosome segregation, largely performed at the IMP. The award that comes with three million US dollars is the mos ... more

  • Finances

    Bristol to lead revolutionary research into 'self-healing' materials

    The Manufacturing Immortality Project is a three-year project, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), that will investigate the development of new materials made up of biological and non-biological parts which are capable of self-healing. Initially the pro ... more

    Alnylam and Sanofi enter into strategic restructuring

    Optimizing development and commercialization of RNAi therapeutics for rare diseases

    Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi announced a strategic restructuring of their RNAi therapeutics alliance to streamline and optimize development and commercialization of certain products for the treatment of rare genetic diseases. Specifically, Alnylam will obtain global development ... more

    Takeda announces its intention to acquire TiGenix

    TiGenix NV confirms that Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited has announced its intention to launch a voluntary conditional takeover bid on TiGenix. Takeda intends to acquire 100% of the securities with voting rights or giving access to voting rights of TiGenix not already owned by Takeda ... more

  • Cooperation

    Alnylam and Sanofi enter into strategic restructuring

    Optimizing development and commercialization of RNAi therapeutics for rare diseases

    Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi announced a strategic restructuring of their RNAi therapeutics alliance to streamline and optimize development and commercialization of certain products for the treatment of rare genetic diseases. Specifically, Alnylam will obtain global development ... more

    CureVac and Arcturus Therapeutics announce broad strategic collaboration

    Develop next generation of lipid-mediated mRNA therapeutics

    CureVac AG and Arcturus Therapeutics Ltd. announced they have entered into a broad strategic collaboration to jointly discover, develop and commercialize novel messenger RNA (mRNA) therapeutics. Under the agreement, the companies will collaborate to develop up to four molecular therapy prod ... more

    Confo Therapeutics enters into drug discovery collaboration with Roche

    Confo Therapeutics, announced that it has entered into a research collaboration and license agreement with Roche for the discovery, development and commercialisation of novel, small molecule agonists of an undisclosed G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) for the treatment of neurological and d ... more

  • Technology

    How the MRSA bacterium handles stress

    An international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results eventually can be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms. ... more

    A bendable touch panel with silver nano ink printing

    JST has recognized the results of NexTEP's project, "A Sensor Film for Touch Panels Using Thin Metallic Wire" as a success.This development task was based on the research of Professor Tatsuo Hasegawa, Principal Research Manager at the Flexible Electronics Research Center of the National Ins ... more

    Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterials

    Immunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body's immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenti ... more

  • Laws

    Combined resistance to multiple antibiotics: A growing problem in the EU

    On the occasion of the 10th European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is releasing its latest EU-wide data on antibiotic resistance, as well as its guidance on prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). In ... more

    Focus on Medical Device Regulation

    BVMed, Earlybird, High-Tech Gründerfonds and BIOCOM publish “MedTech Radar 9”

    The EU Medical Device Regulation heralds a new era for the medical technology sector: in future, any company wishing to bring medical devices to market must face the requirements of this new regulatory framework. This implies a sizeable challenge for the many small and medium-sized enterpri ... more

    EPA to Grant Merck’s Patent Application for CRISPR Technology

    Related patent application recently awarded in Australia

    Merck announced the European Patent Office (EPO) has issued a “Notice of Intention to Grant” for Merck’s patent application covering the company’s CRISPR technology used in a genomic integration method for eukaryotic cells. The patent will provide Merck’s CRISPR genomic integration technolo ... more

  • Market

    Abzena takes on new facilities

    Abzena plc enables the development and manufacture of biopharmaceutical products, provides an update on its UK and US facilities. In Cambridge, UK, the Group’s lease has commenced for 30,000 square feet of space in Building 900 on the Babraham Research Campus, as first announced in February ... more

    Inauguration of world’s largest fermentation plant for cultures

    In November a successful collaboration between GEA and long-term customer Chr. Hansen was completed with the inauguration of the world’s largest fermentation plant for bacterial cultures at the customer’s site in Copenhagen, Denmark. Chr. Hansen is a global bioscience company that develops ... more

    SYGNIS AG signs supply agreement with US Biological

    Agreement comprises supply of antibody labelling technology

    SYGNIS AG announced it has signed a supply agreement with US Biological for its Innova Lightning-Link technology. Heikki Lanckriet, CEO and CSO of SYGNIS AG, commented: “We are delighted that US Biological has chosen Lighting-Link as its preferred method for antibody labelling. The technol ... more

  • Politics

    cytena receives Dr. Rudolf-Eberle-Prize 2017

    Ministry of Economics recognizes cytena’s innovative energy

    cytena was distinguished with the Innovation Award of Baden-Württemberg, one of the most economically powerful and competitive regions in Europe. Since 1985, the Ministry of Economics recognizes small and medium-sized enterprises for their innovative products, processes and services. The Mi ... more

    EMA to relocate to Amsterdam

    Working with Dutch government to ensure successful move by end of March 2019

    The European Medicines Agency (EMA) will relocate to Amsterdam in the Netherlands. This decision was taken today by the EU 27 Member States in the margins of the General Affairs Council (Art.50). The Agency now has just over 16 months to prepare for the move and take up its operations in Am ... more

    Combined resistance to multiple antibiotics: A growing problem in the EU

    On the occasion of the 10th European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is releasing its latest EU-wide data on antibiotic resistance, as well as its guidance on prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). In ... more

  • Manufacturing

    Abzena takes on new facilities

    Abzena plc enables the development and manufacture of biopharmaceutical products, provides an update on its UK and US facilities. In Cambridge, UK, the Group’s lease has commenced for 30,000 square feet of space in Building 900 on the Babraham Research Campus, as first announced in February ... more

    Inauguration of world’s largest fermentation plant for cultures

    In November a successful collaboration between GEA and long-term customer Chr. Hansen was completed with the inauguration of the world’s largest fermentation plant for bacterial cultures at the customer’s site in Copenhagen, Denmark. Chr. Hansen is a global bioscience company that develops ... more

    GE Healthcare acquires bioprocessing start-up

    Obtaining nanofiber-based platform purification technology for biopharmaceutical production

    GE Healthcare has completed the acquisition of Puridify, a bioprocessing start-up that is developing a nanofiber-based platform purification technology for biopharmaceutical production. Puridify’s technology, FibroSelect, is complementary to the bead resins and chromatography membranes used ... more

  • Career

    Tracking Down Genetic Influences on Brain Disorders

    New findings will help to identify the genetic causes of brain disorders: researchers at the Universities of Basel, Bonn and Cologne have presented a systematic catalog of specific variable locations in the genome that influence gene activity in the human hippocampus. Individual differences ... more

    Merck Named a Top Employer by Science Magazine

    Survey ranks Merck fourth among the world’s top employers

    Merck announced it was ranked fourth among biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies worldwide by Science magazine, a leading peer-reviewed international scientific publication. This ranking marks the fourth year in a row Merck was named one of the top 20 employers in the healthcare and li ... more

    To be or not to be an academic: the question for all postdocs

    Becoming a full time academic at a research university is not an easy road.

    Becoming a full time academic at a research university is a dream for many young scientists, but it's not an easy road. For the past eight years, Dr Liz Elvidge has been helping postdoctoral researchers achieve this goal − but also advising them about a variety of different career paths and ... more

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