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Researchers make a key discovery in how malaria evades the immune system

The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum hijacks an immune system process to invade red blood cells, according to a study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. Understanding how malaria invades the cells could lead to a more effective vaccine. Malaria kills about 1 million ... more

Scientists show commonly prescribed painkiller slows cancer growth

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that one of the most widely prescribed pain and anti-inflammation drugs slows the growth rate of a specific kind of cancer in animal models and suggests the medication could have the same effect on other ... more

Researchers developing GPS for rectal cancer surgery

Researchers estimate that up to 10,000 rectal cancer patients undergo unnecessary surgery, and more than 25,000 suffer from pelvic sepsis, wound infection and permanent impairments from aggressive surgery in the United States annually. That's because it's difficult to reliably tell which pa ... more

First large-scale proteogenomic study of breast cancer provides insight into potential therapeutic targets

Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale "proteogenomic" study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer. Conducted by member ... more

Prenatal fruit consumption boosts babies' cognitive development

Most people have heard the old adage "an apple a day keeps the doctor away." It's an old truth that encompasses more than just apples--eating fruit in general is well known to reduce risk for a wide variety of health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. But now a new study is showin ... more

Chemo, radiation, surgery combo boosts survival for pancreatic cancer patients

In roughly one-third of pancreatic cancer patients, tumors have grown around the pancreas to encompass critical blood vessels. Conventional wisdom has long held that surgery to remove the tumors is rarely an option, and life expectancies are usually measured in months. Mayo Clinic, teaming ... more

Colorcon and BASF advance co-operation to offer functional coatings for pharmaceutical tablets

Colorcon, Inc. and BASF announced that they have signed an agreement to further strengthen their co-operation in the area of pharmaceutical film coatings. As part of this agreement, BASF will sell its Kollicoat® IR Coating Systems product line to Colorcon; including the current customer bus ... more

Genes linked to the effects of mood and stress on longevity identified

The visible impacts of depression and stress that can be seen in a person's face -- and contribute to shorter lives -- can also be found in alterations in genetic activity, according to newly published research. In a series of studies involving both C. elegans worms and human cohorts, resea ... more

Study finds breast and ovarian cancer may have similar origins

While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. These facts reflect the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatme ... more

Harnessing nature's vast array of venoms for drug discovery

Scorpions, snakes, snails, frogs and other creatures are thought to produce tens or even hundreds of millions of distinct venoms. These venoms have been honed to strike specific targets in the body. For victims of a scorpion's sting, that spells doom. For scientists, however, the potent mol ... more

All news

Genes linked to the effects of mood and stress on longevity identified

The visible impacts of depression and stress that can be seen in a person's face -- and contribute to shorter lives -- can also be found in alterations in genetic activity, according to newly published research. In a series of studies involving both C. elegans worms and human cohorts, resea ... more

Engineers take first step toward flexible, wearable, tricoder-like device

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first flexible wearable device capable of monitoring both biochemical and electric signals in the human body. The Chem-Phys patch records electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals and tracks levels of lactate, a biochemical ... more

Nanotubes are beacons in cancer-imaging technique

Bathing a patient in LED light may someday offer a new way to locate tumors, according to Rice University researchers. The spectral triangulation system developed by Rice chemist Bruce Weisman and his colleagues is intended to pinpoint targeted cancer tumors tagged with antibody-linked carb ... more

More light on cancer

The group of Russian and French researchers, with the participation of scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, has succeeded to synthesize nanoparticles of ultrapure silicon, which exhibited the property of efficient photoluminescence, i.e., secondary light emission after pho ... more

Electronic device detects molecules linked to cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

A biosensor developed by researchers at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil, has been proven capable of detecting molecules associated with neurodegenerative diseases and some types of cancer. The device is basically a single-layer organic na ... more

Evolutionary link between protein structure and function discovered

Proteins are more than a dietary requirement. This diverse set of molecules powers nearly all of the cellular operations in a living organism. Scientists may know the structure of a protein or its function, but haven't always been able to link the two. "The big problem in biology is the que ... more

Evolution of Cellular Power Stations

Mitochondria are the power stations of human cells. They provide the energy needed for the cellular metabolism. But how did these power stations evolve, and how are they constructed? Researchers from the University of Freiburg studied the role of so-called oxidase assembly machinery, or OXA ... more

For cells, some shapes are easier to swallow than others

Scientists have probed the process that allows cells to swallow up particles, finding that some shapes are easier to swallow than others. Cells take in small particles and other objects such as bacteria in a process called engulfment. Single-celled organisms use engulfment to take in food, ... more

New approach to sorting cells

Microfluidic devices hold potential to rapidly analyze cells for applications in medicine and basic research. Researchers have devised systems that can distinguish cells based on their size, deformability, and electrical properties, among other characteristics. A team of MIT researchers has ... more

New technology detects blood clots with simple in-home test

But researchers at the University of Cincinnati -- supported by the National Science Foundation -- are developing materials and technology for a simple in-home screening that could be a game changer for patients with several life-threatening conditions. Patients with cardiovascular disease, ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Demonstration of large-scale technique to produce quantum dots

A method to produce significant amounts of semiconducting nanoparticles for light-emitting displays, sensors, solar panels and biomedical applications has gained momentum with a demonstration by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. While zinc sulfide nano ... more

Making plants fit for climate change

Breeding barley that provides good yields even in a hot and dry climate – a research team of the University of Würzburg is currently busy with this task. The project is part of the new Bavarian alliance "BayKlimaFit" aimed at finding strategies to adapt crops to climate change. As climate ... more

Ingestible robot operates in simulated stomach

In experiments involving a simulation of the human esophagus and stomach, researchers at MIT, the University of Sheffield, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have demonstrated a tiny origami robot that can unfold itself from a swallowed capsule and, steered by external magnetic fields, c ... more

analytica 2016: Record number of exhibitors thanks to 6.5 percent increase

During the past four days (May 10 to 13), a total of 1,244 exhibitors from 40 countries presented their product innovations including a number of world premieres to some 35,000 visitors at analytica. There was a considerable increase it the share of exhibitors and visitors from abroad. As a ... more

Silk stabilizes blood samples for months at high temperatures

Researchers at Tufts University have stabilized blood samples for long periods of time without refrigeration and at high temperatures by encapsulating them in air-dried silk protein. The technique has broad applications for clinical care and research that rely on accurate analysis of blood ... more

Cancer-fighting gene therapy

The Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), part of the Helmholtz Association, has announced a cooperation project between two MDC research groups and three industry partners: the ‘Max Delbrück Center Cell Engineering Lab’ (MD-CEL). Their joint goal is to develop a cell-based gene ... more

Rodolfo Savitzky appointed as new CFO for Lonza Group

Lonza announced that its Board of Directors appointed Rodolfo Savitzky as new Chief Financial Officer for Lonza. In this function he will be succeeding Toralf Haag, who after 11 years of service for Lonza accepted an offer from the Voith Group in Germany to become their new CFO and member o ... more

First single-enzyme method to produce quantum dots revealed

Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanocrystals prized for their optical and electronic properties. The brilliant, pure colors produced by QDs when stimulated with ultraviolet light are ideal for use in flat screen displays, medical imaging devices, solar panels and LEDs. One obstacle to ... more

Process analysis in real time

With a real-time mass spectrometer developed by Fraunhofer researchers, it has become possible for the first time to analyze up to 30 components simultaneously from the gas phase and a liquid, including in-situ analysis. This sensitive measurement system is also suitable for the automated m ... more

SYGNIS plans to acquire profitable proteomics player

SYGNIS AG resolved, with the approval of the Supervisory Board, to acquire Expedeon Holdings Ltd., a privately held UK proteomics companywith sales offices in the U.S., UK and Singapore. Expedeon develops, manufactures and commercializes proteomics reagents and tools, marketed worldwide by ... more

All news on biotechnology

First large-scale proteogenomic study of breast cancer provides insight into potential therapeutic targets

Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale "proteogenomic" study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer. Conducted by member ... more

PET imaging with special tracer can detect and diagnose early Alzheimer's disease

The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a "nuclear medicine" for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special 'tracer' that binds to the amyloid pla ... more

Engineers take first step toward flexible, wearable, tricoder-like device

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first flexible wearable device capable of monitoring both biochemical and electric signals in the human body. The Chem-Phys patch records electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals and tracks levels of lactate, a biochemical ... more

Nanotubes are beacons in cancer-imaging technique

Bathing a patient in LED light may someday offer a new way to locate tumors, according to Rice University researchers. The spectral triangulation system developed by Rice chemist Bruce Weisman and his colleagues is intended to pinpoint targeted cancer tumors tagged with antibody-linked carb ... more

More light on cancer

The group of Russian and French researchers, with the participation of scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, has succeeded to synthesize nanoparticles of ultrapure silicon, which exhibited the property of efficient photoluminescence, i.e., secondary light emission after pho ... more

Electronic device detects molecules linked to cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

A biosensor developed by researchers at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil, has been proven capable of detecting molecules associated with neurodegenerative diseases and some types of cancer. The device is basically a single-layer organic na ... more

Siemens acquires NEO New Oncology AG

Siemens Healthineers has expanded its diagnostics portfolio with the acquisition of NEO New Oncology AG, Cologne, Germany. The company's cancer genome diagnostic platform NEO will support pathologists and oncologists with comprehensive molecular information to help select targeted cancer th ... more

Researchers shed light on pathway from virus to brain disease

Why people on immunosuppressant drugs for autoimmune conditions have a higher incidence of an often-fatal brain disease may be linked to a mutation in a common virus, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine . Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare dise ... more

Cancer can arise from changes in the proteins that package DNA

A mutation that affects the proteins that package DNA--without changing the DNA itself--can cause a rare form of cancer, according to new findings from researchers at The Rockefeller University . The mutation is present in histones, the protein scaffolding around which DNA wraps. Researcher ... more

Gene regulatory mutation linked to rare childhood cancer

A single defect in a gene that codes for a histone -- a "spool" that wraps idle DNA -- is linked to pediatric cancers in a study published today in the journal Science. "Unlike most cancers that require multiple hits, we found that this particular mutation can form a tumor all by itself," s ... more

All news on diagnostics

analytica 2016: Record number of exhibitors thanks to 6.5 percent increase

During the past four days (May 10 to 13), a total of 1,244 exhibitors from 40 countries presented their product innovations including a number of world premieres to some 35,000 visitors at analytica. There was a considerable increase it the share of exhibitors and visitors from abroad. As a ... more

RephiLe Appoints Peter Lucas as President, North America

RephiLe Bioscience Ltd. has appointed Peter Lucas as President-North America effective March 15, 2016. Mr. Lucas will be responsible for all North America operations for RephiLe.  Peter brings a wealth of experience, global leadership, and extensive market knowledge to RephiLe Bioscience.  ... more

analytica 2016: Key platform for upcoming scientists

analytica (at the Messe München trade-fair center from May 10–13) is more than just the most important platform for scientific experts and well-known equipment manufacturers in the laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology sectors. It is also the first place that future industry pro ... more

The latest technologies in food and plastics analysis, bioanalysis and genetic analysis

It's just around the corner: analytica, the world's largest trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology, opens its gates in just a few weeks. From May 10 to 13, visitors will experience a unique combination of the entire range of technological innovations as well as the ... more

Sartorius Off to a Dynamic Start in 2016

Sartorius got off to a successful start in fiscal 2016, with double-digit gains in sales revenue and earnings. "We continue to see dynamic growth driven by both divisions and all business regions," commented CEO Dr. Joachim Kreuzburg. "Especially our larger Bioprocess Solutions Division has ... more

Laboratory of the future at analytica in Munich in the present

Everyone is talking about digitalizing society and industry. Doing so will also have an enormous influence on the laboratory. analytica, which takes place in Munich from May 10–13, 2016, will examine the challenges facing manufacturers and users and what solutions are already available for ... more

LUM GmbH starts exclusive distribution of PSI-homogenizers in several countries

With immediate effect LUM GmbH, Berlin, Germany, starts the exclusive distribution of PSI instruments in Germany, Austria, France and China. The distributorship agreement between the manufacturer Particle Solutions Innovations BV from the Netherlands and LUM GmbH forms part of the developme ... more

analytica Vietnam is moving to Hanoi

The fifth edition of analytica Vietnam, a spin-off of analytica in Munich, will take place at the International Center for Exhibition (I.C.E.) in Hanoi from March 29 to 31, 2017. Moving the trade fair from Ho Chi Minh City to the Vietnamese capital has advantages: Hanoi is the political cen ... more

Recognizing and avoiding dangers in the laboratory

In many cases, even the slightest mistake can have devastating consequences. Dealing with hazardous materials in the laboratory calls for extreme caution. Visitors attending analytica (May 10–13, 2016, Messe München) can find out how laboratory employees should act and what protective measu ... more

Sartorius Grows by Double Digits

Sartorius grew very dynamically again in 2015 according to its preliminary figures and further increased its profitability. The company achieved or exceeded its financial targets raised during the reporting year. For the current fiscal year as well, management expects to record significant ... more

All news on lab technology

Scientists show commonly prescribed painkiller slows cancer growth

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that one of the most widely prescribed pain and anti-inflammation drugs slows the growth rate of a specific kind of cancer in animal models and suggests the medication could have the same effect on other ... more

Chemo, radiation, surgery combo boosts survival for pancreatic cancer patients

In roughly one-third of pancreatic cancer patients, tumors have grown around the pancreas to encompass critical blood vessels. Conventional wisdom has long held that surgery to remove the tumors is rarely an option, and life expectancies are usually measured in months. Mayo Clinic, teaming ... more

Colorcon and BASF advance co-operation to offer functional coatings for pharmaceutical tablets

Colorcon, Inc. and BASF announced that they have signed an agreement to further strengthen their co-operation in the area of pharmaceutical film coatings. As part of this agreement, BASF will sell its Kollicoat® IR Coating Systems product line to Colorcon; including the current customer bus ... more

Harnessing nature's vast array of venoms for drug discovery

Scorpions, snakes, snails, frogs and other creatures are thought to produce tens or even hundreds of millions of distinct venoms. These venoms have been honed to strike specific targets in the body. For victims of a scorpion's sting, that spells doom. For scientists, however, the potent mol ... more

Targeted treatment for liver cancer under way

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen have discovered a new molecular mechanism that can be used to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma, which is the most common liver cancer. The study found that mouse and human liver cancer in ... more

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis

Scientists from ITMO University and Trinity College have designed an optically active nanosized supercrystal whose novel architecture can help separate organic molecules, thus considerably facilitating the technology of drug synthesis. The structure of the new supercrystal is similar to a h ... more

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation

Nanosized Trojan horses created from a patient's own immune cells have successfully treated inflammation by overcoming the body's complex defense mechanisms, perhaps leading to broader applications for treating diseases characterized by inflammation, such as cancer and cardiovascular diseas ... more

Rice University lab simplifies total synthesis of anti-cancer agent

The lab of Rice University synthetic organic chemist K.C. Nicolaou has reported the streamlined total synthesis of delta12-prostaglandin J3, a molecule previously claimed to kill leukemic cancer cells. The researchers said their work sets the stage for large-scale synthesis of the cytotoxic ... more

Triple-therapy cocktail shrinks triple-negative breast tumors

In a new study using mice and lab-grown human cells, a scientific team led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers show how a triple-drug cocktail can shrink triple-negative breast cancers by killing off cancer cells and halting new tumor growth. The combination treatment is compo ... more

Merck and Pfizer to present Avelumab data in seven different cancers

Merck and Pfizer announced that avelumab presentations across seven different tumor types, including two oral presentations, will be featured at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. The avelumab presentations, from the rapidly accelerating JAVELIN clinical develo ... more

All news on pharma

Researchers make a key discovery in how malaria evades the immune system

The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum hijacks an immune system process to invade red blood cells, according to a study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. Understanding how malaria invades the cells could lead to a more effective vaccine. Malaria kills about 1 million ... more

Scientists show commonly prescribed painkiller slows cancer growth

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that one of the most widely prescribed pain and anti-inflammation drugs slows the growth rate of a specific kind of cancer in animal models and suggests the medication could have the same effect on other ... more

Researchers developing GPS for rectal cancer surgery

Researchers estimate that up to 10,000 rectal cancer patients undergo unnecessary surgery, and more than 25,000 suffer from pelvic sepsis, wound infection and permanent impairments from aggressive surgery in the United States annually. That's because it's difficult to reliably tell which pa ... more

First large-scale proteogenomic study of breast cancer provides insight into potential therapeutic targets

Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale "proteogenomic" study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer. Conducted by member ... more

Prenatal fruit consumption boosts babies' cognitive development

Most people have heard the old adage "an apple a day keeps the doctor away." It's an old truth that encompasses more than just apples--eating fruit in general is well known to reduce risk for a wide variety of health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. But now a new study is showin ... more

Chemo, radiation, surgery combo boosts survival for pancreatic cancer patients

In roughly one-third of pancreatic cancer patients, tumors have grown around the pancreas to encompass critical blood vessels. Conventional wisdom has long held that surgery to remove the tumors is rarely an option, and life expectancies are usually measured in months. Mayo Clinic, teaming ... more

Genes linked to the effects of mood and stress on longevity identified

The visible impacts of depression and stress that can be seen in a person's face -- and contribute to shorter lives -- can also be found in alterations in genetic activity, according to newly published research. In a series of studies involving both C. elegans worms and human cohorts, resea ... more

Study finds breast and ovarian cancer may have similar origins

While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. These facts reflect the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatme ... more

PET imaging with special tracer can detect and diagnose early Alzheimer's disease

The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a "nuclear medicine" for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special 'tracer' that binds to the amyloid pla ... more

Chloride 'switch' turns on membrane formation

Chloride plays a key role in the formation of the basement membrane, a suprastructure on the outside of cells that undergirds and guides the function of most of the tissues of the body. In particular, chloride signals the assembly of collagen IV "smart scaffolds," a critical step in basemen ... more

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