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Struggles ahead in China for chemical and pharmaceutical companies

China's economic downturn plus other factors, including overcapacity and tightening regulations, mean the next two to three years could be challenging for the foreign chemical and pharmaceutical companies located there. To survive in China as it adjusts to a slower pace of growth, businesse ... more

Tracking Down the Causes of Alzheimer’s

Genes are not only important for regular memory performance, but also for the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at the University of Basel now identified a specific group of genes that plays a central role in both processes. This group of molecules controls the concentration o ... more

Exposure to phthalates could be linked to pregnancy loss

A new study of more than 300 women suggests that exposure to certain phthalates could be associated with miscarriage, mostly between 5 and 13 weeks of pregnancy. The research is the first epidemiological study on non-work-related exposure to phthalates to provide evidence for the possible l ... more

Horizon Discovery Group and Redx Pharma sign cancer research collaboration

Horizon Discovery Group  and Redx Pharma plc announced a research collaboration to progress Redx’s novel pan-RAF inhibitor program, for out-licensing in oncology indications including colorectal cancer.   Redx’s pan-RAF inhibitor program has identified next generation novel small molecule i ... more

Texas A&M team finds neuron responsible for alcoholism

Scientists have pinpointed a population of neurons in the brain that influences whether one drink leads to two, which could ultimately lead to a cure for alcoholism and other addictions. A study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience by researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center ... more

Developing new drug against leading causes of death - sepsis and ARDS

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast are developing a potential revolutionary new treatment for Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), which are among the leading causes of death in hospitalised patients in the UK. Currently, there are no effective treatments available f ... more

Drug for fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for cancer

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. The team recommends physicians consider patient-specific facto ... more

Cellular recycling complexes may hold key to chemotherapy resistance

Altering the protein recycling complexes in human cells, including cancer cells, allows the cells to resist treatment with a class of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors, according to Whitehead Institute scientists. "This is why some cancers can be so difficult to treat with chemotherapy, ... more

Abbott announces results of its naturally dissolving stent

Abbott announced positive one-year clinical results from ABSORB Japan, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing the safety and effectiveness of Abbott's fully dissolving Absorb™ heart stent to XIENCE ®, Abbott's market-leading, permanent drug eluting stent. The trial was conducted in 38 s ... more

Mobidiag and Unilabs enter into agreement over use of Amplidiag product line for molecular gastrointestinal diagnostics

Mobidiag Ltd and Unilabs announced an agreement covering the supply of Amplidiag products over the next four years for Unilabs in Sweden and Norway. The Amplidiag product line covers six diagnostic products for various gastrointestinal infections, including tests for gastroenteritis, carbap ... more

All news

Texas A&M team finds neuron responsible for alcoholism

Scientists have pinpointed a population of neurons in the brain that influences whether one drink leads to two, which could ultimately lead to a cure for alcoholism and other addictions. A study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience by researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center ... more

Cellular recycling complexes may hold key to chemotherapy resistance

Altering the protein recycling complexes in human cells, including cancer cells, allows the cells to resist treatment with a class of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors, according to Whitehead Institute scientists. "This is why some cancers can be so difficult to treat with chemotherapy, ... more

Brazilian wasp venom kills cancer cells by opening them up

The social wasp Polybia paulista protects itself against predators by producing venom known to contain a powerful cancer-fighting ingredient. A study reveals exactly how the venom's toxin--called MP1 (Polybia-MP1) - selectively kills cancer cells without harming normal cells. MP1 interacts ... more

TGen study identifies potential genes associated with the most common form of liver damage

In a first-of-its-kind exploratory study, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) has identified a potential gene associated with the initiation of the most common cause of liver damage. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver damage. In this ... more

A quarter of a century: Analytik Jena celebrates

Analytik Jena AG looks back on a quarter century of successful corporate development. The Thuringian company, which has been part of the Swiss Endress+Hauser Group for two years, was founded in spring 1990 during the time of German reunification as a sales company and, with commercial regis ... more

Chemists solve major piece of cellular mystery

Not just anything is allowed to enter the nucleus, a double membrane serves as a wall, protecting the contents of the nucleus. Any molecules trying to enter or exit the nucleus must do so via a cellular gatekeeper known as the nuclear pore complex (NPC). How can the NPC be such an effective ... more

Imaging techniques set new standard for super-resolution in live cells

Scientists can now watch dynamic biological processes with unprecedented clarity in living cells using new imaging techniques developed by researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus. The new methods dramatically improve on the spatial resolution provided by ... more

Glitter from silver lights up Alzheimer's dark secrets

Scientists have caught a glimpse of the elusive toxic form of the Alzheimer's molecule, during its attempt to bore into the outer covering of a cell decoy, using a new method involving laser light and fat-coated silver nano-particles. While the origin of Alzheimer's Disease, one that robs t ... more

Research team identifies structure of tumor-suppressing protein

An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN. Their findings provide new insights into how the protein regulates cell growth and how mutatio ... more

Two proteins work together to help cells eliminate trash and Parkinson's may result

Two proteins that share the ability to help cells deal with their trash appear to need each other to do their jobs and when they don't connect, it appears to contribute to development of Parkinson's disease, scientists report.Much like a community's network for garbage handling, cells also ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Abbott announces results of its naturally dissolving stent

Abbott announced positive one-year clinical results from ABSORB Japan, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing the safety and effectiveness of Abbott's fully dissolving Absorb™ heart stent to XIENCE ®, Abbott's market-leading, permanent drug eluting stent. The trial was conducted in 38 s ... more

Modified CAR T cells can preferentially target cancer cells and spare normal cells

Engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to lower their affinity for the protein epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) made the cells preferentially recognize and eliminate tumor cells that have high amounts of EGFR while sparing normal cells that have lower amounts of the pro ... more

DNA-guided 3-D printing of human tissue is unveiled

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These mini-tissues in a dish can be used to study how particular structural ... more

Scientists engineer designer proteins that control enzyme activity

Scientists have developed a novel approach to control the activity of enzymes through the use of synthetic, antibody-like proteins known as monobodies. A team led by Shohei Koide, PhD, professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics, was able to change the specificity of an enzyme withou ... more

Inducing metabolic catastrophe in cancer cells

Cancer cells survive the stressful environment inside a tumor in part through autophagy, the controlled digestion and recycling of damaged components. However, blocking the process doesn't kill cancer cells, so researchers have been looking for a way to make cells vulnerable to autophagy sh ... more

Gene regulating severity of tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis identified

Scientists have identified a new (C5orf30) which regulates the severity of tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Following the discovery published in PNAS, rheumatoid arthritis patients most likely to suffer the severest effects of the condition can now be identified early and ... more

Scientists identify possible key in virus, cancer research

Researchers have taken a big step forward in the fight against cancer with a discovery that could open up the door for new research and treatment options. Fanxiu Zhu, the FSU Margaret and Mary Pfeiffer Endowed Professor for Cancer Research, and his team uncovered a viral protein in the cell ... more

The DNA damage response goes viral: A way in for new cancer treatments

Every organism must protect its DNA at all costs, but precisely how a cell distinguishes between damage to its own DNA and the foreign DNA of an invading virus has remained a mystery. Now, scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered critical details of how a cell's response system tell ... more

These microscopic fish are 3-D-printed to do more than swim

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego used a 3D printing technology they developed to manufacture multipurpose fish-shaped microrobots that swim around efficiently in liquids, are chemically powered by hydrogen peroxide and magnetically controlled. These proof-of-concept ... more

Another milestone in hybrid artificial photosynthesis

A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) developing a bioinorganic hybrid approach to artificial photosynthesis have achieved another milestone. Having generated quite a buzz with their hybrid system of semiconductin ... more

All news on biotechnology

Research shows testosterone changes brain structures in female-to-male transsexuals

Brain imaging shows that testosterone therapy given as part of sex reassignment changes the brain structures and the pathway associated with speech and verbal fluency. This result supports research that women in general may deal with speech and interaction differently than men. The sex horm ... more

New optical method promises faster, more accurate diagnosis of breast cancer

A new optical method for more quickly and accurately determining whether breast tissue lesions are cancerous is described by University of Illinois researchers. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Chicago researchers Hassaan Majeed, Mikhail Kandel, Kevin Han, Zelun Luo, Virgilia ... more

Relapse, poor survival in leukemia linked to genetic mutations that persist in remission

For patients with an often-deadly form of leukemia, new research suggests that lingering cancer-related mutations - detected after initial treatment with chemotherapy - are associated with an increased risk of relapse and poor survival. Using genetic profiling to study bone marrow samples f ... more

PET imaging detects fast-growing prostate cancer

A molecular imaging biomarker is able to detect fast-growing primary prostate cancer and distinguish it from benign prostate lesions, addressing an unmet clinical need. The new research, published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, is significant for patients with suspected prostate cancer ... more

Optical 'dog's nose' may hold key to breath analysis

University of Adelaide researchers are developing a laser system for fast, non-invasive, onsite breath analysis for disease, potentially enabling screening for a range of diseases including diabetes, infections and various cancers in the future. The researchers have developed an instrument ... more

GNA Biosolutions completes € 6 million financing round

GNA Biosolutions GmbH (GNA), a manufacturer of ultrafast pathogen diagnostic instruments, will receive fresh capital of € 6 million in a series B financing round. Founded in 2010, GNA welcomes new investors Robert Bosch Venture Capital (RBVC), SHS Gesellschaft für Beteiligungsmanagement Gmb ... more

QIAGEN and Biotype Diagnostics form partnership

QIAGEN and Biotype Diagnostics GmbH announced that they have entered into a partnership to establish Biotype Innovation GmbH ("Biotype Innovation"). The new company will develop and commercialize molecular diagnostic workflows initially for personalized healthcare applications based on QIAG ... more

Thousands of Droplets for Diagnostics

A team of scientists including PhD student Friedrich Schuler from the Laboratory of MEMS Applications at the Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) of the University of Freiburg has developed a method for dividing a DNA sample into thousands of tiny droplets. What sets it apart from ... more

Eurofins acquires Diatherix Laboratories, Inc.

Eurofins Scientific  announces that it has signed an agreement to acquire Diatherix Laboratories, Inc. for approximately US$ 50m, plus an earn-out upon achievement of pre-defined revenue and profitability targets. Completion of the transaction is expected in the next 30 days and is subject ... more

Tracking Sperm

Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), a new imaging technique for in situ localization of spermatozoa, might improve the results of testicular sperm extraction while reducing traumata during surgery.In the middle of Europe nearly every sixth couple in the reproductive age is inv ... more

All news on diagnostics

Thomas Bachmann is new Chief Executive Officer of the Eppendorf Group

Thomas Bachmann became Chief Executive Officer of the Eppendorf Group on August 1, 2015. Following the departure of Eppendorf's previous CEO, the company's Chief Financial Officer, Detmar Ammermann, had exercised the function of Spokesman of the Management Board on an interim basis in addit ... more

BioTek Instruments Receives 5x5x5 Growth Award for Technology

BioTek Instruments has been recognized as one of the 5x5x5 Growth Award winners for 2015. This annual award is sponsored by Vermont Business Magazine and KeyBank, and is presented to five Vermont businesses that have experienced the greatest growth over the past five years in five different ... more

Huntingdon Life Sciences and Harlan Laboratories announce new equity funding

Huntingdon Life Sciences (HLS) and Harlan Laboratories, soon to be called Envigo, announced that a group of institutional investors has committed up to $125 million in a minority equity financing that can be used to fund future growth initiatives. Brian Cass, CEO, commented: “We recently an ... more

David Newble joins TTP Labtech as new managing director

TTP Labtech announced the appointment of David Newble as its new managing director. Dr. Jas Sangera, founder, managing director and key driver for the company for the last 14 years, will continue his role as the company’s chairman.David Newble has a proven track record of growing life scien ... more

BIOTECHNICA and LABVOLUTION: Biologization and digitalization are top themes

Two trade shows, one ticket: For the first time, Deutsche Messe is staging BIOTECHNICA (6 to 8 October 2015) in conjunction with the new LABVOLUTION in order to attract an even wider industry audience to Hannover. While BIOTECHNICA is a showcase for mainstream biotechnology and the life sci ... more

Danaher To Acquire Pall Corporation

Danaher Corporation announced that it has entered into a definitive merger agreement with Pall Corporation pursuant to which Danaher will acquire all of the outstanding shares of Pall for $127.20 per share in cash, or a total enterprise value of approximately $13.8 billion, including assume ... more

SYGNIS signs non-exclusive distribution agreement with Cambridge Bioscience Ltd. for UK and Ireland

SYGNIS AG announced a distribution agreement with Cambridge Bioscience for the commercialization of SYGNIS’ proprietary product portfolio in the UK and Ireland.Under the terms of the agreement, Cambridge Bioscience will promote, market, sell and support TruePrime™ products for primer-free W ... more

Sartorius Starts Off Fiscal 2015 with a Strong First Quarter

Sartorius started off fiscal 2015 with substantial double-digit gains in order intake, sales revenue and earnings. Group order intake rose 13.1%, excluding currency effects; this reported figure surged 22.7%. Sales climbed 17.2% in constant currencies; the reported figure, 27.0%. Operating ... more

Genevac Consolidate Evaporator & Freeze Dryer Operations In Germany

Genevac has announced, as of 1st April 2015, that LMS Consult GmbH (LMS) has been appointed as the exclusive German distributor for its market leading evaporator systems plus the freeze dryer range of its parent company - SP Scientific.For over 30 years - LMS Consulthave successfully sold a ... more

Ximbio Expands Team

Ximbio announced the expansion of its team, with two new appointments. Dr Hugh Spotswood has joined as Senior Business Manager, and Emily Haggerty as a Scientific Portfolio Associate. Hugh’s role as part of Ximbio is to head up the business development function to maximise the revenue creat ... more

All news on lab technology

Struggles ahead in China for chemical and pharmaceutical companies

China's economic downturn plus other factors, including overcapacity and tightening regulations, mean the next two to three years could be challenging for the foreign chemical and pharmaceutical companies located there. To survive in China as it adjusts to a slower pace of growth, businesse ... more

Horizon Discovery Group and Redx Pharma sign cancer research collaboration

Horizon Discovery Group  and Redx Pharma plc announced a research collaboration to progress Redx’s novel pan-RAF inhibitor program, for out-licensing in oncology indications including colorectal cancer.   Redx’s pan-RAF inhibitor program has identified next generation novel small molecule i ... more

Developing new drug against leading causes of death - sepsis and ARDS

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast are developing a potential revolutionary new treatment for Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), which are among the leading causes of death in hospitalised patients in the UK. Currently, there are no effective treatments available f ... more

Drug for fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for cancer

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. The team recommends physicians consider patient-specific facto ... more

Cellular recycling complexes may hold key to chemotherapy resistance

Altering the protein recycling complexes in human cells, including cancer cells, allows the cells to resist treatment with a class of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors, according to Whitehead Institute scientists. "This is why some cancers can be so difficult to treat with chemotherapy, ... more

Abbott announces results of its naturally dissolving stent

Abbott announced positive one-year clinical results from ABSORB Japan, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing the safety and effectiveness of Abbott's fully dissolving Absorb™ heart stent to XIENCE ®, Abbott's market-leading, permanent drug eluting stent. The trial was conducted in 38 s ... more

Mobidiag and Unilabs enter into agreement over use of Amplidiag product line for molecular gastrointestinal diagnostics

Mobidiag Ltd and Unilabs announced an agreement covering the supply of Amplidiag products over the next four years for Unilabs in Sweden and Norway. The Amplidiag product line covers six diagnostic products for various gastrointestinal infections, including tests for gastroenteritis, carbap ... more

Evotec and CHDI Foundation expand ongoing collaboration to fight Huntington's disease

Evotec AG announced that CHDI Foundation, Inc. has extended and expanded its collaboration with Evotec through to August 2018. Over this period CHDI will fund 55 full-time scientists at Evotec. The collaboration-which aims to find new treatments for Huntington's disease, an inherited neurod ... more

Bristol-Myers Squibb enters agreement to acquire Promedior, Inc.

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Promedior, Inc. announced that the companies have entered into an agreement that grants Bristol-Myers Squibb an exclusive right to acquire Promedior and gain worldwide rights to its lead asset PRM-151, a recombinant form of human pentraxin-2 protein in Phase ... more

IMD Natural Solutions Receives €4 Million Equity Investment from Zhejiang Hisun Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.

IMD Natural Solutions GmbH (INS) announced a collaboration with Zhejiang Hisun Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. under which INS receives a €4 million equity investment and provides Hisun access to INS’ unique natural product lead discovery platform for antimicrobials and antioxidants for the food, ... more

All news on pharma

Tracking Down the Causes of Alzheimer’s

Genes are not only important for regular memory performance, but also for the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at the University of Basel now identified a specific group of genes that plays a central role in both processes. This group of molecules controls the concentration o ... more

Exposure to phthalates could be linked to pregnancy loss

A new study of more than 300 women suggests that exposure to certain phthalates could be associated with miscarriage, mostly between 5 and 13 weeks of pregnancy. The research is the first epidemiological study on non-work-related exposure to phthalates to provide evidence for the possible l ... more

Texas A&M team finds neuron responsible for alcoholism

Scientists have pinpointed a population of neurons in the brain that influences whether one drink leads to two, which could ultimately lead to a cure for alcoholism and other addictions. A study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience by researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center ... more

Drug for fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for cancer

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. The team recommends physicians consider patient-specific facto ... more

Cirrhosis, antibodies increase risk of poor outcome for autoimmune hepatitis patients

New research reports that cirrhosis at first diagnosis and antibodies for the soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas antigen (SLA/LP) are major risk factors for poor short- and long-term outcome in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Results also found that patients diagnosed in childhood wer ... more

TGen study identifies potential genes associated with the most common form of liver damage

In a first-of-its-kind exploratory study, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) has identified a potential gene associated with the initiation of the most common cause of liver damage. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver damage. In this ... more

Completely paralyzed man voluntarily moves his legs

A 39-year-old man who had had been completely paralyzed for four years was able to voluntarily control his leg muscles and take thousands of steps in a "robotic exoskeleton" device during five days of training a team of UCLA scientists reports this week. This is the first time that a person ... more

Autism Speaks launches MSSNG portal for open-access genomics research

The MSSNG portal enables qualified scientists to access, study and share findings on detailed genomic information from people with autism spectrum disorder and their family members. MSSNG aims to sequence the complete genomes of 10,000 individuals affected by autism and their families by ea ... more

DNA-guided 3-D printing of human tissue is unveiled

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These mini-tissues in a dish can be used to study how particular structural ... more

Sanofi to Collaborate with Google Life Sciences to Improve Diabetes Health Outcomes

Sanofi and the life sciences team at Google announced that they are collaborating to improve care and outcomes for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The collaboration will pair Sanofi's diabetes treatments and devices with Google's expertise in analytics, miniaturized electronics and ... more

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