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How proteins reshape cell membranes

Small "bubbles" frequently form on membranes of cells and are taken up into their interior. The process involves EHD proteins - a focus of research by Prof. Oliver Daumke of the MDC. He and his team have now shed light on how these proteins assemble on the surface of a cell and reshape its ... more

In the molecular bench vise

Scientists measure molecular forces between nucleosomes

The genome molecule contains the blueprint for life. The manner in which the blueprint is packed into the cell determines which genes are active and which are set to inactive. Disturbing this structure can result in illnesses such as cancer. Munich scientists have now succeeded in using mol ... more

Bachem expands its Corporate Executive Committee

Bachem announced that Dr. Alex Fässler has been appointed to its Corporate Executive Committee as a new member, effective April 1, 2017. Alex Fässler will have global responsibility for the Group’s production sites as Chief Operations Officer (COO). He will strengthen the Corporate Executiv ... more

Nanostraws sample a cell's contents without damage

Cells within our bodies divide and change over time, with thousands of chemical reactions occurring within each cell daily. This makes it difficult for scientists to understand what's happening inside. Now, tiny nanostraws developed by Stanford researchers offer a method of sampling cell co ... more

Novasep opensnew antibody-drug conjugate bioconjugation unit

Novasep announces that its new €11M bioconjugation facility is now operational. The greenfield facility was erected within 20 months on Novasep’s Le Mans site in France. The 2,000m2 facility features two flexible GMP production suites equipped with 10L to 400L vessels to support both clinic ... more

Drugs could be developed cheaper and faster

Chemists at the University of Waterloo, SCIEX and Pfizer have discovered a new way to help the pharmaceutical industry identify and test new drugs, which could revolutionize drug development, and substantially reduce the cost and time drugs need to reach their market. The study, published i ... more

A close look at sharp vision in eye structure seen only in humans and other primates

Vision scientists have uncovered some of the reasons behind the unusual perceptual properties of the eye's fovea. Only humans and other primates have this dimple-like structure in their retinas. It is responsible for visual experiences that are rich in colorful spatial detail. Figuring out ... more

Teflon subproducts recycled into valuable pharmaceuticals

Fluoroform is highly pollutant, greenhouse effect chemical compound made of carbon and fluorine atoms. It is generated as one of the main waste products in the preparation of popular anti-adherent polymer Teflon. Eliminating fluoroform is expensive, mostly because it is a very good flame re ... more

High indoxyl sulfate levels caused by acute kidney injury damages lungs

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is sudden kidney failure or damage lasting from a few hours to several days. During this time, the kidney's ability to maintain a proper balance of bodily fluids is compromised and causes a buildup of waste products in the blood. There are several causes of AKI inc ... more

How an essential methane catalyst is made

New ways to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into methane gas for energy use are a step closer after scientists discovered how bacteria make a component that facilitates the process. Recycling CO2 into energy has immense potential for making these emissions useful rather than a major factor in ... more

All news

How proteins reshape cell membranes

Small "bubbles" frequently form on membranes of cells and are taken up into their interior. The process involves EHD proteins - a focus of research by Prof. Oliver Daumke of the MDC. He and his team have now shed light on how these proteins assemble on the surface of a cell and reshape its ... more

Nanostraws sample a cell's contents without damage

Cells within our bodies divide and change over time, with thousands of chemical reactions occurring within each cell daily. This makes it difficult for scientists to understand what's happening inside. Now, tiny nanostraws developed by Stanford researchers offer a method of sampling cell co ... more

analytica Vietnam 2017: More exhibitors and a strong supporting program

analytica Vietnam is being held for the fifth time this year, and interest among companies is stronger than ever. Compared to the last time the fair was held (2015), approximately 15 percent more exhibitors are expected. Exhibition space is up by the same amount. Besides the product highlig ... more

Seeing DNA 'blink'

Many of the secrets of cancer and other diseases lie in the cell's nucleus. But getting way down to that level -- to see and investigate the important genetic material housed there -- requires creative thinking and extremely powerful imaging techniques. Vadim Backman and Hao Zhang, nanoscal ... more

Researchers identify phosphorylation process vital to cancer growth

Scientists at VIB-KU Leuven have identified a new mechanism that impacts tumor growth. The typical lack of oxygen in tumors doesn't only stimulate proliferation, but also offsets the important role of the protein PHD2 as 'cancer cell killer'. A possible solution lies in blocking the enzyme ... more

Illuminating the contacts

The development of super resolution microscopy has revolutionised how scientists view and understand the inner workings of the cell. Just as advances in satellite camera technology gave rise to highly detailed maps of the world, so too has super-resolution microscopy allowed researchers to ... more

New research shows that proteins are 'virtually' knotted

Many of the processes essential to life involve proteins - long molecules which 'fold' into three-dimensional shapes allowing them to perform their biological role. Consisting of strings of amino acids, a folded protein molecule resembles a coiled, tangled piece of wire, which, as everyday ... more

New method to detect ultrasound with light

A tiny, transparent device that can fit into a contact lens has a bright future, potentially helping a range of scientific endeavors from biomedicine to geology. Developed by Northwestern University scientists, the device, called the Micro-ring resonator detector, can determine the speed of ... more

Ubiquitous and influential

Scientists at the University of Würzburg have generated new insights into the intricate molecular underpinnings of ubiquitin signaling. Their results may provide new avenues for cancer therapy. The small protein ubiquitin regulates a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological process ... more

X-ray pulses reveal structure of viral cocoon

An international team of scientists has used high-intensity X-ray pulses to determine the structure of the crystalline protein envelope of an insect virus. Their analysis reveals the fine details of the building blocks that make up the viral cocoon down to a scale of 0.2 nanometres (million ... more

All news on bioanalytics

In the molecular bench vise

Scientists measure molecular forces between nucleosomes

The genome molecule contains the blueprint for life. The manner in which the blueprint is packed into the cell determines which genes are active and which are set to inactive. Disturbing this structure can result in illnesses such as cancer. Munich scientists have now succeeded in using mol ... more

Bachem expands its Corporate Executive Committee

Bachem announced that Dr. Alex Fässler has been appointed to its Corporate Executive Committee as a new member, effective April 1, 2017. Alex Fässler will have global responsibility for the Group’s production sites as Chief Operations Officer (COO). He will strengthen the Corporate Executiv ... more

Novasep opensnew antibody-drug conjugate bioconjugation unit

Novasep announces that its new €11M bioconjugation facility is now operational. The greenfield facility was erected within 20 months on Novasep’s Le Mans site in France. The 2,000m2 facility features two flexible GMP production suites equipped with 10L to 400L vessels to support both clinic ... more

How an essential methane catalyst is made

New ways to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into methane gas for energy use are a step closer after scientists discovered how bacteria make a component that facilitates the process. Recycling CO2 into energy has immense potential for making these emissions useful rather than a major factor in ... more

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

(V

The human heart beats more than 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime. Now scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart's amazing biomechanical properties. "We created the I-Wire Heart-on-a-Chip so that we can understand wh ... more

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain

Three-in-one design allows genetic, chemical, optical, and electrical inputs and outputs.

For the first time ever, a single flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical, and chemical signals back and forth into the brain, putting into practice an idea first proposed two years ago. With some tweaking to further improve ... more

Discovery of a new gene critical in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers

Inhibition of this gene provokes a drastic reduction in the size of these tumors

Researchers at the Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA) of the University of Navarra (Spain) have identified a critical gene, FOSL1, in the development of lung and pancreatic cancer. Approximately 25% of patients with lung cancer and 90% of those with pancreatic cancer show mutations ... more

analytica Vietnam 2017: More exhibitors and a strong supporting program

analytica Vietnam is being held for the fifth time this year, and interest among companies is stronger than ever. Compared to the last time the fair was held (2015), approximately 15 percent more exhibitors are expected. Exhibition space is up by the same amount. Besides the product highlig ... more

Artificial synapse for neural networks

For all the improvements in computer technology over the years, we still struggle to recreate the low-energy, elegant processing of the human brain. Now, researchers at Stanford University and Sandia National Laboratories have made an advance that could help computers mimic one piece of the ... more

Chemists reveal novel biocatalysts for bioactive alkaloid synthesis

Alkaloids are natural nitrogen-containing compounds produced by plants and microbes. These molecules, such as morphine and quinine, are important human medicines. Alkaloids are typically polycyclic in nature. While the polycyclic characteristics are important for their bioactivities, these ... more

All news on biotechnology

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain

Three-in-one design allows genetic, chemical, optical, and electrical inputs and outputs.

For the first time ever, a single flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical, and chemical signals back and forth into the brain, putting into practice an idea first proposed two years ago. With some tweaking to further improve ... more

Discovery of a new gene critical in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers

Inhibition of this gene provokes a drastic reduction in the size of these tumors

Researchers at the Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA) of the University of Navarra (Spain) have identified a critical gene, FOSL1, in the development of lung and pancreatic cancer. Approximately 25% of patients with lung cancer and 90% of those with pancreatic cancer show mutations ... more

analytica Vietnam 2017: More exhibitors and a strong supporting program

analytica Vietnam is being held for the fifth time this year, and interest among companies is stronger than ever. Compared to the last time the fair was held (2015), approximately 15 percent more exhibitors are expected. Exhibition space is up by the same amount. Besides the product highlig ... more

Seeing DNA 'blink'

Many of the secrets of cancer and other diseases lie in the cell's nucleus. But getting way down to that level -- to see and investigate the important genetic material housed there -- requires creative thinking and extremely powerful imaging techniques. Vadim Backman and Hao Zhang, nanoscal ... more

Ebolaviruses need very few mutations to cause disease in new host species

Kent researchers have identified how few mutations it can take for Ebolaviruses to adapt to affect previously resistant species. Ebola is one of the world's most virulent diseases, though rodent species such as guinea pigs, rats and mice are not normally susceptible to it. However, through ... more

A new contrast agent for MRI

New iron oxide nanoparticles could help avoid a rare side effect caused by current contrast agents

A new, specially coated iron oxide nanoparticle developed by a team at MIT and elsewhere could provide an alternative to conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. In rare cases, the currently used gadolinium agents have been found to ... more

New method to detect ultrasound with light

A tiny, transparent device that can fit into a contact lens has a bright future, potentially helping a range of scientific endeavors from biomedicine to geology. Developed by Northwestern University scientists, the device, called the Micro-ring resonator detector, can determine the speed of ... more

Manufacturers in the laboratory sector choose analytica

Large number of exhibitors registered more than a year before analytica

More than a year before the fair, this much is certain: analytica 2018 is very popular among exhibitors. Some 14 months before the next exhibition is set to begin, more than 230 companies have already registered to participate in the International Trade Fair for Laboratory Technology, Analy ... more

Direct radiolabeling of nanomaterials

Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. The radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omi ... more

Wave of the future

Terahertz chips a new way of seeing through matter

Electromagnetic pulses lasting one millionth of a millionth of a second may hold the key to advances in medical imaging, communications and drug development. But the pulses, called terahertz waves, have long required elaborate and expensive equipment to use. Now, researchers at Princeton Un ... more

All news on diagnostics

Drugs could be developed cheaper and faster

Chemists at the University of Waterloo, SCIEX and Pfizer have discovered a new way to help the pharmaceutical industry identify and test new drugs, which could revolutionize drug development, and substantially reduce the cost and time drugs need to reach their market. The study, published i ... more

analytica Vietnam 2017: More exhibitors and a strong supporting program

analytica Vietnam is being held for the fifth time this year, and interest among companies is stronger than ever. Compared to the last time the fair was held (2015), approximately 15 percent more exhibitors are expected. Exhibition space is up by the same amount. Besides the product highlig ... more

Resolutions of the Sartorius Supervisory Board

Rainer Lehmann appointed to the Executive Board

The Supervisory Board of Sartorius AG approved the Executive Board’s recommendation to submit a proposal to the Annual Shareholders’ Meeting on April 6, 2017, to raise dividends to 0.46 euros per preference share and to 0.45 per ordinary share. Prior-year dividends, adjusted by the stock sp ... more

Manufacturers in the laboratory sector choose analytica

Large number of exhibitors registered more than a year before analytica

More than a year before the fair, this much is certain: analytica 2018 is very popular among exhibitors. Some 14 months before the next exhibition is set to begin, more than 230 companies have already registered to participate in the International Trade Fair for Laboratory Technology, Analy ... more

Sartorius Grows by Double Digits

Number of employees grows by around 12% to more than 6,900

Sartorius grew dynamically in both divisions in fiscal 2016 according to its preliminary figures and achieved its financial targets raised at mid-year. "The year 2016 was highly successful for Sartorius, both operationally and strategically," commented CEO Dr. Joachim Kreuzburg. "Our Biopro ... more

Waters Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2016 Financial Results

Asia Pacific and Europe led strong global growth

Waters Corporation reported fourth quarter 2016 sales of $629 million, a 7% increase versus sales of $587 million in the fourth quarter of 2015. Foreign currency translation reduced sales growth by 2% in the quarter. On a GAAP basis, earnings per diluted share (EPS) for the fourth quarter w ... more

WALDNER Laboreinrichtungen extends Management Board

Joerg Hoffmann has been appointed to the management board of WALDNER Laboreinrichtungen GmbH & Co. KG just over 100 days ago. Together with Horst Schierholz he is responsible for the corporation and will provide new impetus regarding international sales. “We have to position ourselves in a ... more

Tecan appoints Klaus Lun Head of the Life Sciences Business division

The Tecan Group announced that Dr. Klaus Lun, Head of Corporate Development and a member of the Management Board of the Tecan Group since June 2013, has been appointed Head of the Life Sciences Business division. On December 14, 2016, Tecan announced that Dr. Stefan Traeger, Head of the Lif ... more

Combatting antimicrobial resistance with smartphones

A simple and inexpensive attachment could help to expand testing to regions with limited resources.

A team of UCLA researchers has developed an automated diagnostic test reader for antimicrobial resistance using a smartphone. The technology could lead to routine testing for antimicrobial susceptibility in areas with limited resources. Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are posing a severe t ... more

Carl Zeiss Meditec AG continues its growth trend

Positive revenue and earnings trend – further growth in recurring revenue

Carl Zeiss Meditec AG has brought financial year 2015/16 to a successful close with further growth: Revenue increased by 4.6 percent (adjusted for currency effects: 2.7 percent) to €1,088.4m. Earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) rose to €154.3m (prior year: €130.6m). The EBIT margin in ... more

All news on lab technology

Bachem expands its Corporate Executive Committee

Bachem announced that Dr. Alex Fässler has been appointed to its Corporate Executive Committee as a new member, effective April 1, 2017. Alex Fässler will have global responsibility for the Group’s production sites as Chief Operations Officer (COO). He will strengthen the Corporate Executiv ... more

Drugs could be developed cheaper and faster

Chemists at the University of Waterloo, SCIEX and Pfizer have discovered a new way to help the pharmaceutical industry identify and test new drugs, which could revolutionize drug development, and substantially reduce the cost and time drugs need to reach their market. The study, published i ... more

Teflon subproducts recycled into valuable pharmaceuticals

Fluoroform is highly pollutant, greenhouse effect chemical compound made of carbon and fluorine atoms. It is generated as one of the main waste products in the preparation of popular anti-adherent polymer Teflon. Eliminating fluoroform is expensive, mostly because it is a very good flame re ... more

Grand challenge for innovation in global vaccine manufacturing

Vaccines are among the most transformative and successful outcomes of modern medicine. For countries fortunate enough to have immunization coverage, their value can also lower or avert healthcare costs, increase economic productivity, and reduce poverty. The cost of producing and distributi ... more

Recipharm completes strategic acquisition in India

Recipharm AB announces that it has now concluded the acquisition of Kemwell’s pharmaceutical businesses located in Bengaluru, India. The expands position in emerging markets significantly, taking sales in these markets to more than SEK 800 million, dominated by sales directly to the fast-gr ... more

MS treatment that 'resets' immune system may halt disease for at least 5 years

Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects around 100,000 people in the UK, and 2.3 million worldwide. The condition is caused by the immune system malfunctioning and mistakenly attacking nerves in the brain and spinal cord. This leads to a range of symptoms including fatigue, problems with arm and le ... more

Improving therapies for GI tumors

The signaling protein Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is overexpressed in several cancer types and has diverse oncogenic functions, making it an attractive druggable cancer target. Wael El-Rifai , M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues are exploring a role for AURKA in upper gastrointestinal cancers, which ar ... more

Breakthrough in fight against superbug: klebsiella pneumonia

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have discovered why a lethal superbug is so resistant to the last line antibiotic meaning potential treatments could now be developed to fight the killer infection. The research carried out by Professor Jose Bengoechea, Director at the Centre for Ex ... more

Cellular responses to bird flu vaccine uncovered

New research from Vanderbilt University eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu. The study exposes cellular responses associated with a vaccine constituent called AS03, short for adjuvant system 03. Using massive computation, ... more

Takeda Completes Acquisition of ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Takeda announced the completion of its acquisition of ARIAD Pharmaceuticals for $24.00 per share in cash. “We are very pleased to have completed the acquisition of ARIAD Pharmaceuticals. The addition of ARIAD’s innovative targeted therapies and research and development capabilities strength ... more

All news on pharma

Nanostraws sample a cell's contents without damage

Cells within our bodies divide and change over time, with thousands of chemical reactions occurring within each cell daily. This makes it difficult for scientists to understand what's happening inside. Now, tiny nanostraws developed by Stanford researchers offer a method of sampling cell co ... more

High indoxyl sulfate levels caused by acute kidney injury damages lungs

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is sudden kidney failure or damage lasting from a few hours to several days. During this time, the kidney's ability to maintain a proper balance of bodily fluids is compromised and causes a buildup of waste products in the blood. There are several causes of AKI inc ... more

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

(V

The human heart beats more than 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime. Now scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart's amazing biomechanical properties. "We created the I-Wire Heart-on-a-Chip so that we can understand wh ... more

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain

Three-in-one design allows genetic, chemical, optical, and electrical inputs and outputs.

For the first time ever, a single flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical, and chemical signals back and forth into the brain, putting into practice an idea first proposed two years ago. With some tweaking to further improve ... more

T cells in babies give clues to who will develop type 1 diabetes

The research group of Prof. Ezio Bonifacio, group leader and Director at the DFG-Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at TU Dresden, and group leader at DZD-Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden, introduces a new understanding of cellular mechanisms occurring ... more

Discovery of a new gene critical in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers

Inhibition of this gene provokes a drastic reduction in the size of these tumors

Researchers at the Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA) of the University of Navarra (Spain) have identified a critical gene, FOSL1, in the development of lung and pancreatic cancer. Approximately 25% of patients with lung cancer and 90% of those with pancreatic cancer show mutations ... more

Study finds 'sweet spot' where tissue stiffness drives cancer's spread

In order for cancer to spread, malignant cells must break away from a tumor and through the tough netting of extracellular matrix, or ECM, that surrounds it. To fit through the holes in this net, those cancerous cells must elongate into a torpedo-like shape. Researchers from the University ... more

New approach for the capture of tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line

Researchers at Washington State University report a new approach for the effective capture of tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line. Exosomes are small secreted vesicles that play a key role in intercellular communication and cancer progression. Developing effective and hi ... more

Unlocking the heart-protective benefits of soy

A product of digesting a micronutrient found in soy may hold the key to why some people seem to derive a heart-protective benefit from eating soy foods, while others do not, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study discovered. Japanese men who are able to produc ... more

Artificial synapse for neural networks

For all the improvements in computer technology over the years, we still struggle to recreate the low-energy, elegant processing of the human brain. Now, researchers at Stanford University and Sandia National Laboratories have made an advance that could help computers mimic one piece of the ... more

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