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Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has vi ... more

Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation

Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mT ... more

Do not try CRISPR at home

Urgent warning from FDA

Gene therapy is the administration of genetic material to modify or manipulate the expression of a gene product or to alter the biological properties of living cells for therapeutic use. Gene therapies offer the potential to treat diseases or conditions for which no or few treatments exist. ... more

Production of protein pharmaceuticals with yeast

It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology has finally succeeded in mapping out the complex metabolism of yeast cells. The breakthrough, recently published in an article in Nature Communications, means a huge step forward ... more

Live-cell microscopy reveals cell migration by direct forces

How do cells move in a certain direction in the body -- go to a wound site and repair it, for example, or hunt down infectious bacteria and kill it? Two new studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) show how cells respond to internal forces when they orient, gain traction, and mig ... more

Acrobatic Duo in the Cells

Chaperones help folding of other proteins

Just like an acrobatic duo, some proteins lend each other stability. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have discovered that the protein “Trigger factor” recognizes a partner by instable, flexible domains, to then together form a stable protein duo. Misfolded proteins ... more

The world's smallest Mona Lisa

In 2006, Caltech's Paul Rothemund (BS '94)—now research professor of bioengineering, computing and mathematical sciences, and computation and neural systems—developed a method to fold a long strand of DNA into a prescribed shape. The technique, dubbed DNA origami, enabled scientists to crea ... more

Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments

Microbiologists led by Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who is internationally known for having discovered electrically conducting microfilaments or "nanowires" in the bacterium Geobacter, announce in a new paper this month that they have discovered the unexpected st ... more

Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami

A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using Kirigami designs. The Kirigami-based biopr ... more

Channeling graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain ... more

All news

Live-cell microscopy reveals cell migration by direct forces

How do cells move in a certain direction in the body -- go to a wound site and repair it, for example, or hunt down infectious bacteria and kill it? Two new studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) show how cells respond to internal forces when they orient, gain traction, and mig ... more

Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami

A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using Kirigami designs. The Kirigami-based biopr ... more

Protein-folding simulations sped up

Proteins, the ubiquitous workhorses of biochemistry, are huge molecules whose function depends on how they fold into intricate structures. To understand how these molecules work, researchers use computer modeling to calculate how proteins fold. Now, a new algorithm can accelerate those vita ... more

Microscope using UV instead of visible light emerging as diagnostic tool

MUSE image of sebaceous glandA microscope using ultraviolet light to illuminate samples enables pathologists to assess high-resolution images of biopsies and other fresh tissue samples for disease within minutes, without requiring the time-consuming preparation of conventional slides or des ... more

A new role for an old protein in breast cancer

Scientists led by Dr Chris Toseland of the University's School of Biosciences studied a protein called Myosin VI, a molecular motor which acts as a courier to transport other proteins within our cells. Myosin VI is highly present in many cancers yet the role is unclear. Dr Toseland's study ... more

The function of many proteins remains uncertain

The DNA of every organism holds the blueprints for building all the proteins it needs for its metabolic processes. While researchers already know what the blueprints look like for most proteins, they do not know what many of these proteins actually do in the body. An interdisciplinary team ... more

Why are genetically identical individuals different? Ask your mum!

Does the age of a mother influence the traits and characteristics of her progeny, and how? A team of scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona have addressed these questions by studying tiny, genetically identical C. elegans worms. "Our lab has long been interested ... more

Mapping chemicals in the skin

Reducing animal experiments with chemical imaging

A new method of examining the skin can reduce the number of animal experiments while providing new opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Chemical imaging allows all layers of the skin to be seen and the presence of virtually any substance in any part of the skin to be meas ... more

Bioremediation fungus yields its secrets

Gene transfer from bacteria – and the corresponding stress!

Thanks to genes acquired from bacteria, a fungus can degrade an environmentally harmful hydrocarbon - and comes under considerable stress in the process. These remarkable research findings, which were published recently, were obtained by a group from the University of Natural Resources and ... more

Cells bulge to squeeze through barriers

Invasive cells deploy a trick to break through tissues and spread to other parts of the body, researchers report. In a new study, 3-D time-lapse imaging of cellular "break-ins" in the transparent worm C. elegans reveals a fleeting, yet key structure in action. A single protrusion bulges out ... more

All news on bioanalytics

Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has vi ... more

Do not try CRISPR at home

Urgent warning from FDA

Gene therapy is the administration of genetic material to modify or manipulate the expression of a gene product or to alter the biological properties of living cells for therapeutic use. Gene therapies offer the potential to treat diseases or conditions for which no or few treatments exist. ... more

Production of protein pharmaceuticals with yeast

It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology has finally succeeded in mapping out the complex metabolism of yeast cells. The breakthrough, recently published in an article in Nature Communications, means a huge step forward ... more

The world's smallest Mona Lisa

In 2006, Caltech's Paul Rothemund (BS '94)—now research professor of bioengineering, computing and mathematical sciences, and computation and neural systems—developed a method to fold a long strand of DNA into a prescribed shape. The technique, dubbed DNA origami, enabled scientists to crea ... more

Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments

Microbiologists led by Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who is internationally known for having discovered electrically conducting microfilaments or "nanowires" in the bacterium Geobacter, announce in a new paper this month that they have discovered the unexpected st ... more

Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami

A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using Kirigami designs. The Kirigami-based biopr ... more

Channeling graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain ... more

Discngine raises €1.1 million in Series A funding round

Discngine, a software company specializing in applications for life sciences research, today announces a Series A financing round of €1.1 million ($1.3M), received from Extens Développement e-Santé. The funds raised will allow Discngine to move forward with its Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) ... more

DNA origami surpasses important thresholds

It is the double strands of our genes that make them so strong. Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicist Hendrik Dietz has been building nanometer-scale objects for several years at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Now Dietz and his team have not only broken out of the ... more

The future of crop engineering

Scientists want to increase the efficiency of photosynthesis

Photosynthesis is the process underlying all plant growth. Scientists aim to boost photosynthesis to meet the increasing global demand for food by engineering its key enzyme Rubisco. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have succeeded in producing functional plant Ru ... more

All news on biotechnology

Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami

A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using Kirigami designs. The Kirigami-based biopr ... more

Genetic model identifies primary myelofibrosis outcomes

A group of investigators from Mayo Clinic and multiple academic research centers in Italy have identified a genetic model for predicting outcomes in patients with primary myelofibrosis who are 70 years or younger and candidates for stem cell transplant to treat their disease. The group's fi ... more

Microscope using UV instead of visible light emerging as diagnostic tool

MUSE image of sebaceous glandA microscope using ultraviolet light to illuminate samples enables pathologists to assess high-resolution images of biopsies and other fresh tissue samples for disease within minutes, without requiring the time-consuming preparation of conventional slides or des ... more

New diagnostic tool aids quality control in xenotransplantations

Bacterial protein recognises immunogenic sugar molecules on pig cells

Sugars are highly important molecules for all life. They convey vital signals, and thus participate in manifold biological processes (e.g. determination of blood-types and the formation of bacterial biofilms). Sugars are often recognized by specialized proteins called lectins. Researchers a ... more

Visible signals from brain and heart

New sensor measures calcium concentrations deep inside tissue

Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of ... more

SYGNIS AG signs supply agreement with US Biological

Agreement comprises supply of antibody labelling technology

SYGNIS AG announced it has signed a supply agreement with US Biological for its Innova Lightning-Link technology. Heikki Lanckriet, CEO and CSO of SYGNIS AG, commented: “We are delighted that US Biological has chosen Lighting-Link as its preferred method for antibody labelling. The technol ... more

Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis

New rapid test in development

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases. An early diagnosis is vital for the timely and right kind of therapy. There are five different types of parasites at the origin of t ... more

New details on aged brain, Alzheimer's and dementia revealed

In a comprehensive analysis of samples from 107 aged human brains, researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, UW Medicine and Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute have discovered details that will help researchers better understand the biological bases for Alzhe ... more

Revolutionary imaging technique uses CRISPR to map DNA mutations

A team of scientists led by Virginia Commonwealth University physicist Jason Reed, Ph.D., have developed new nanomapping technology that could transform the way disease-causing genetic mutations are diagnosed and discovered. Described in a study this novel approach uses high-speed atomic fo ... more

Symcel secures €3.6 million Horizon 2020 Phase II grant

Multi-resistant bacterial sepsis infections to be validated utilising sensitive screening technology

Symcel, the company behind the revolutionary cell-based assay tool for real-time cell metabolism measurements, calScreener™, has secured €3.572 million Horizon 2020 funding to support the company’s evaluation of improved combination testing of antibiotics against extensively drug-resistant ... more

All news on diagnostics

Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has vi ... more

Channeling graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain ... more

Discngine raises €1.1 million in Series A funding round

Discngine, a software company specializing in applications for life sciences research, today announces a Series A financing round of €1.1 million ($1.3M), received from Extens Développement e-Santé. The funds raised will allow Discngine to move forward with its Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) ... more

First DNA sequence from a single mitochondria

DNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, found researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. This knowledge will help to better illuminate the underlying mechanisms of many disorders that start with accumulated mutatio ... more

Copper to replace palladium and platinum in the synthesis of medications

Effectiveness of copper nanoparticles catalysts proven

Chemists of Ural Federal University with colleagues from India proved the effectiveness of copper nanoparticles as a catalyst on the example of analysis of 48 organic synthesis reactions. One of the advantages of the catalyst is its insolubility in traditional organic solvents. This makes c ... more

Promising biobased alternatives to polar aprotic solvents

A report from Wageningen Food & Biobased Research commissioned by RIVM (the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment) has revealed a number of promising biobased alternatives to the controversial polar aprotic solvents NMP, DMAc and DMF. Wageningen Food & Biobased Rese ... more

Computer analysis fills gaps in antibody blueprint

Antibodies defend our bodies against intruders. These molecules consist of proteins with attached sugars. However, the blueprint directing the processing of these sugars on the protein was not well understood until now. Scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München used computer analysis to ... more

cytena receives Dr. Rudolf-Eberle-Prize 2017

Ministry of Economics recognizes cytena’s innovative energy

cytena was distinguished with the Innovation Award of Baden-Württemberg, one of the most economically powerful and competitive regions in Europe. Since 1985, the Ministry of Economics recognizes small and medium-sized enterprises for their innovative products, processes and services. The Mi ... more

Mettler Toledo starts production at its third plant in Changzhou

Mettler Toledo (Changzhou) Measurement Technology started production at its new US$34.42 million facility, the first phase of a new plant, on November 16, 2017. The firm is the third manufacturing subsidiary that Switzerland-based Mettler Toledo (Holdings) Group has established at Changzhou ... more

Happy Birthday, analytica!

50 years international leading trade fair for laboratory technology, analytics and biotechnology

In 2018, analytica will celebrate its 50th anniversary. Since 1968 it has been accompanying the development of chemical analytics and bioanalytics. And more: It stimulates the transfer of technology and expertise, as it brings together equipment manufacturers and laboratory analysts, scient ... more

All news on lab technology

Production of protein pharmaceuticals with yeast

It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology has finally succeeded in mapping out the complex metabolism of yeast cells. The breakthrough, recently published in an article in Nature Communications, means a huge step forward ... more

Discngine raises €1.1 million in Series A funding round

Discngine, a software company specializing in applications for life sciences research, today announces a Series A financing round of €1.1 million ($1.3M), received from Extens Développement e-Santé. The funds raised will allow Discngine to move forward with its Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) ... more

Gene therapy improves immunity in babies with 'bubble boy' disease

Early evidence suggests that gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital will lead to broad protection for infants with the devastating immune disorder X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disorder. Preliminary results from the ongoing, multicenter study were includ ... more

Biotage acquires Horizon Technology

Strengthens position in environmental and food safety

Biotage AB has entered into an agreement to acquire all outstanding shares in the privately held company Horizon Technology, Inc. (Horizon) based in New Hampshire, US, at a purchase price of approx. USD 18.4 million, corresponding to approx. SEK 153 million[1], based on an enterprise value ... more

Zika vaccine induces strong immune response in three phase 1 studies

Three Phase 1 human clinical trials evaluating an Army-developed Zika purified inactivated virus (ZPIV) vaccine have shown it was safe and well-tolerated in healthy adults and induced a robust immune response. Each of the three studies included in the paper was designed to address a unique ... more

Copper to replace palladium and platinum in the synthesis of medications

Effectiveness of copper nanoparticles catalysts proven

Chemists of Ural Federal University with colleagues from India proved the effectiveness of copper nanoparticles as a catalyst on the example of analysis of 48 organic synthesis reactions. One of the advantages of the catalyst is its insolubility in traditional organic solvents. This makes c ... more

New TB drugs possible with understanding of old antibiotic

Tuberculosis, and other life-threatening microbial diseases, could be more effectively tackled with future drugs, thanks to new research into an old antibiotic by the University of Warwick and The Francis Crick Institute. Led by Professor David Roper at Warwick's School of Life Sciences and ... more

Horizon extends industry-leading gene editing IP portfolio

Expansion of CRISPR license rights with ERS Genomics

Horizon Discovery Group announced the extension of their pre-existing non-exclusive, worldwide license agreement to significantly expand Horizon’s license coverage for the use of the CRISPR gene editing technology. This will enable Horizon to use CRISPR in multiple new areas across its prod ... more

Proteros names Dave Lemus as new executive board member

Proteros biostructures GmbH announced that the Company’s Supervisory board had appointed Dave Lemus, previously a non-executive director at Proteros, as Executive Vice Chairman, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Proteros Biostructures GmbH. Additionally, he will serve i ... more

Nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer

Tumor-targeting nanoparticles loaded with a drug that makes cancer cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy's toxicity could be used to treat an aggressive and often deadly form of endometrial cancer, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy. For the first time, ... more

All news on pharma

Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation

Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mT ... more

Genetic model identifies primary myelofibrosis outcomes

A group of investigators from Mayo Clinic and multiple academic research centers in Italy have identified a genetic model for predicting outcomes in patients with primary myelofibrosis who are 70 years or younger and candidates for stem cell transplant to treat their disease. The group's fi ... more

Gene therapy improves immunity in babies with 'bubble boy' disease

Early evidence suggests that gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital will lead to broad protection for infants with the devastating immune disorder X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disorder. Preliminary results from the ongoing, multicenter study were includ ... more

Zika vaccine induces strong immune response in three phase 1 studies

Three Phase 1 human clinical trials evaluating an Army-developed Zika purified inactivated virus (ZPIV) vaccine have shown it was safe and well-tolerated in healthy adults and induced a robust immune response. Each of the three studies included in the paper was designed to address a unique ... more

New TB drugs possible with understanding of old antibiotic

Tuberculosis, and other life-threatening microbial diseases, could be more effectively tackled with future drugs, thanks to new research into an old antibiotic by the University of Warwick and The Francis Crick Institute. Led by Professor David Roper at Warwick's School of Life Sciences and ... more

Horizon extends industry-leading gene editing IP portfolio

Expansion of CRISPR license rights with ERS Genomics

Horizon Discovery Group announced the extension of their pre-existing non-exclusive, worldwide license agreement to significantly expand Horizon’s license coverage for the use of the CRISPR gene editing technology. This will enable Horizon to use CRISPR in multiple new areas across its prod ... more

Microscope using UV instead of visible light emerging as diagnostic tool

MUSE image of sebaceous glandA microscope using ultraviolet light to illuminate samples enables pathologists to assess high-resolution images of biopsies and other fresh tissue samples for disease within minutes, without requiring the time-consuming preparation of conventional slides or des ... more

Nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer

Tumor-targeting nanoparticles loaded with a drug that makes cancer cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy's toxicity could be used to treat an aggressive and often deadly form of endometrial cancer, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy. For the first time, ... more

Programmable drug delivery platform combats diseased cells at genetic level

A new drug delivery system that uses a synthetic-biological hybrid nanocapsule could provide a smart technology for targeted treatment of a variety of serious diseases at the genetic level. The hybrid offers a way to correct diseased cells at the genetic level - while at the same time leavi ... more

A new role for an old protein in breast cancer

Scientists led by Dr Chris Toseland of the University's School of Biosciences studied a protein called Myosin VI, a molecular motor which acts as a courier to transport other proteins within our cells. Myosin VI is highly present in many cancers yet the role is unclear. Dr Toseland's study ... more

All news on healthcare
News by department
  • Products

    CrownBio Launches an Innovative Grant Program

    Funding Advancements in Preclinical Oncology Research

    Crown Bioscience, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Crown Bioscience International announces the launch of a grant program supporting oncology research scientists which provides funding for projects that show promise for scientific advancement of Patient Derived Xenograft (PDX) technology. Resea ... more

    Molzym Automated Pathogen Enrichment and PCR Test Gets CE Mark for In Vitro Diagnostics

    Molzym announces CE IVD marking of their robotic microbial DNA isolation and direct PCR test, Micro-Dx™, for routine pathogen diagnosis. With Micro-Dx™ Molzym introduces its latest development of products in line with SepsiTest™-UMD which was released in 2008. “By Molzym’s proprietary robot ... more

    CureVac Announces Groundbreaking of Industrial-Scale GMP Production Facility for RNA Therapeutics

    CureVac AG announced the groundbreaking of its industrial-scale, GMP-compliant production facility at its headquarters in Tübingen, Germany. The novel production facility – called GMP IV – will be able to produce approximately 30 million doses of RNA-based therapeutics per year, and is expe ... more

  • Business

    Discngine raises €1.1 million in Series A funding round

    Discngine, a software company specializing in applications for life sciences research, today announces a Series A financing round of €1.1 million ($1.3M), received from Extens Développement e-Santé. The funds raised will allow Discngine to move forward with its Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) ... more

    Biotage acquires Horizon Technology

    Strengthens position in environmental and food safety

    Biotage AB has entered into an agreement to acquire all outstanding shares in the privately held company Horizon Technology, Inc. (Horizon) based in New Hampshire, US, at a purchase price of approx. USD 18.4 million, corresponding to approx. SEK 153 million[1], based on an enterprise value ... more

    Horizon extends industry-leading gene editing IP portfolio

    Expansion of CRISPR license rights with ERS Genomics

    Horizon Discovery Group announced the extension of their pre-existing non-exclusive, worldwide license agreement to significantly expand Horizon’s license coverage for the use of the CRISPR gene editing technology. This will enable Horizon to use CRISPR in multiple new areas across its prod ... more

  • Price Development

    Drug costs vary by more than 600% in study of 10 high-income countries

    In a study of 10 high-income countries with universal health care, costs for prescription drugs in 6 of the largest categories of primary care medicines varied by more than 600%. All countries except Canada offered universal coverage of outpatient prescription drugs. The study looked at dat ... more

    Cell Medica granted Orphan Drug designation for novel cellular therapy

    Cell Medica announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Orphan Drug Designation to the company’s cancer immunotherapy treatment, referred to as CMD-003, under development for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) positive non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Additionally, the company announ ... more

    BASF increases prices for Vitamin E and A feed grade

    BASF increases prices for Vitamin E and A products for animal nutrition globally and with immediate effect. Prices will increase by 15% for all Vitamin E products and by 10% for all Vitamin A products. Existing contractual obligations with customers will be honored. more

  • Research

    Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife

    Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has vi ... more

    Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation

    Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mT ... more

    Production of protein pharmaceuticals with yeast

    It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology has finally succeeded in mapping out the complex metabolism of yeast cells. The breakthrough, recently published in an article in Nature Communications, means a huge step forward ... more

  • People

    Proteros names Dave Lemus as new executive board member

    Proteros biostructures GmbH announced that the Company’s Supervisory board had appointed Dave Lemus, previously a non-executive director at Proteros, as Executive Vice Chairman, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Proteros Biostructures GmbH. Additionally, he will serve i ... more

    Breakthrough Prize for Kim Nasmyth

    Kim Nasmyth, emeritus director of the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna, receives one of five 2018 Breakthrough Prizes in Life Sciences for his work on chromosome segregation, largely performed at the IMP. The award that comes with three million US dollars is the mos ... more

    Epigenomics AG appoints Albert Weber as Executive Vice President Finance

    Epigenomics AG announced that the Supervisory Board appointed Albert Weber Executive Vice President of Finance effective January 1, 2018.  Mr. Weber, who has worked at Epigenomics for the past seventeen years, will become a member of the Executive Board of Epigenomics and continue to overse ... more

  • Finances

    Discngine raises €1.1 million in Series A funding round

    Discngine, a software company specializing in applications for life sciences research, today announces a Series A financing round of €1.1 million ($1.3M), received from Extens Développement e-Santé. The funds raised will allow Discngine to move forward with its Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) ... more

    Imperial and Tsinghua University launch seed fund for 'ambitious collaborations'

    The Tsinghua-Imperial Research and Innovation Fund, which brings together two of the world’s leading research universities, aims to kick-start innovative research projects and concepts that are showing signs of promise but are at an early stage in development and need funding to progress. T ... more

    Biotage acquires Horizon Technology

    Strengthens position in environmental and food safety

    Biotage AB has entered into an agreement to acquire all outstanding shares in the privately held company Horizon Technology, Inc. (Horizon) based in New Hampshire, US, at a purchase price of approx. USD 18.4 million, corresponding to approx. SEK 153 million[1], based on an enterprise value ... more

  • Cooperation

    Imperial and Tsinghua University launch seed fund for 'ambitious collaborations'

    The Tsinghua-Imperial Research and Innovation Fund, which brings together two of the world’s leading research universities, aims to kick-start innovative research projects and concepts that are showing signs of promise but are at an early stage in development and need funding to progress. T ... more

    Horizon extends industry-leading gene editing IP portfolio

    Expansion of CRISPR license rights with ERS Genomics

    Horizon Discovery Group announced the extension of their pre-existing non-exclusive, worldwide license agreement to significantly expand Horizon’s license coverage for the use of the CRISPR gene editing technology. This will enable Horizon to use CRISPR in multiple new areas across its prod ... more

    First bio-isobutene batch delivered to L'Oréal by Global Bioenergies

    Global Bioenergies announced delivery of a first batch of sustainable cosmetic ingredients to L'Oréal. It was produced as part of the ISOPROD project, supported by the French State's Investissements for the Future Program. Using proven technologies, Global Bioenergies condensed isobutene mo ... more

  • Technology

    Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife

    Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has vi ... more

    Do not try CRISPR at home

    Urgent warning from FDA

    Gene therapy is the administration of genetic material to modify or manipulate the expression of a gene product or to alter the biological properties of living cells for therapeutic use. Gene therapies offer the potential to treat diseases or conditions for which no or few treatments exist. ... more

    Production of protein pharmaceuticals with yeast

    It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology has finally succeeded in mapping out the complex metabolism of yeast cells. The breakthrough, recently published in an article in Nature Communications, means a huge step forward ... more

  • Laws

    Combined resistance to multiple antibiotics: A growing problem in the EU

    On the occasion of the 10th European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is releasing its latest EU-wide data on antibiotic resistance, as well as its guidance on prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). In ... more

    Focus on Medical Device Regulation

    BVMed, Earlybird, High-Tech Gründerfonds and BIOCOM publish “MedTech Radar 9”

    The EU Medical Device Regulation heralds a new era for the medical technology sector: in future, any company wishing to bring medical devices to market must face the requirements of this new regulatory framework. This implies a sizeable challenge for the many small and medium-sized enterpri ... more

    EPA to Grant Merck’s Patent Application for CRISPR Technology

    Related patent application recently awarded in Australia

    Merck announced the European Patent Office (EPO) has issued a “Notice of Intention to Grant” for Merck’s patent application covering the company’s CRISPR technology used in a genomic integration method for eukaryotic cells. The patent will provide Merck’s CRISPR genomic integration technolo ... more

  • Market

    SYGNIS AG signs supply agreement with US Biological

    Agreement comprises supply of antibody labelling technology

    SYGNIS AG announced it has signed a supply agreement with US Biological for its Innova Lightning-Link technology. Heikki Lanckriet, CEO and CSO of SYGNIS AG, commented: “We are delighted that US Biological has chosen Lighting-Link as its preferred method for antibody labelling. The technol ... more

    Mettler Toledo starts production at its third plant in Changzhou

    Mettler Toledo (Changzhou) Measurement Technology started production at its new US$34.42 million facility, the first phase of a new plant, on November 16, 2017. The firm is the third manufacturing subsidiary that Switzerland-based Mettler Toledo (Holdings) Group has established at Changzhou ... more

    Recipharm awarded for growth in France

    Recipharm, a contract development and manufacturing organisation (CDMO), has received recognition for its commitment to its French operations. The award “le Prix d’Excellence 2017 - Spécial Sciences de la vie” is presented by the Swedish Chamber of Commerce in France. The award is to acknow ... more

  • Politics

    cytena receives Dr. Rudolf-Eberle-Prize 2017

    Ministry of Economics recognizes cytena’s innovative energy

    cytena was distinguished with the Innovation Award of Baden-Württemberg, one of the most economically powerful and competitive regions in Europe. Since 1985, the Ministry of Economics recognizes small and medium-sized enterprises for their innovative products, processes and services. The Mi ... more

    EMA to relocate to Amsterdam

    Working with Dutch government to ensure successful move by end of March 2019

    The European Medicines Agency (EMA) will relocate to Amsterdam in the Netherlands. This decision was taken today by the EU 27 Member States in the margins of the General Affairs Council (Art.50). The Agency now has just over 16 months to prepare for the move and take up its operations in Am ... more

    Combined resistance to multiple antibiotics: A growing problem in the EU

    On the occasion of the 10th European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is releasing its latest EU-wide data on antibiotic resistance, as well as its guidance on prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). In ... more

  • Manufacturing

    GE Healthcare acquires bioprocessing start-up

    Obtaining nanofiber-based platform purification technology for biopharmaceutical production

    GE Healthcare has completed the acquisition of Puridify, a bioprocessing start-up that is developing a nanofiber-based platform purification technology for biopharmaceutical production. Puridify’s technology, FibroSelect, is complementary to the bead resins and chromatography membranes used ... more

    Stora Enso - Large investments in renewable materials

    Stora Enso will invest EUR 94 million to grow in renewable materials and to increase competitiveness in consumer board and biomaterials. EUR 52 million will be invested to increase the dissolving pulp production capacity at Enocell Mill and EUR 42 million to enhance the availability of the ... more

    First bio-isobutene batch delivered to L'Oréal by Global Bioenergies

    Global Bioenergies announced delivery of a first batch of sustainable cosmetic ingredients to L'Oréal. It was produced as part of the ISOPROD project, supported by the French State's Investissements for the Future Program. Using proven technologies, Global Bioenergies condensed isobutene mo ... more

  • Career

    Tracking Down Genetic Influences on Brain Disorders

    New findings will help to identify the genetic causes of brain disorders: researchers at the Universities of Basel, Bonn and Cologne have presented a systematic catalog of specific variable locations in the genome that influence gene activity in the human hippocampus. Individual differences ... more

    Merck Named a Top Employer by Science Magazine

    Survey ranks Merck fourth among the world’s top employers

    Merck announced it was ranked fourth among biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies worldwide by Science magazine, a leading peer-reviewed international scientific publication. This ranking marks the fourth year in a row Merck was named one of the top 20 employers in the healthcare and li ... more

    To be or not to be an academic: the question for all postdocs

    Becoming a full time academic at a research university is not an easy road.

    Becoming a full time academic at a research university is a dream for many young scientists, but it's not an easy road. For the past eight years, Dr Liz Elvidge has been helping postdoctoral researchers achieve this goal − but also advising them about a variety of different career paths and ... more

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