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New scaffold-free 3-D bioprinting available

Cell Applications, Inc. and Cyfuse Biomedical K.K. have announced that advanced tissue-engineering services are now available in North America using a groundbreaking new three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting approach called the "Kenzan Method." Utilizing Cyfuse Biomedical's Regenova® 3D Bio Pr ... more

Nutrient deprivation kills kidney cancer cells

All cells need nutrients, but cancer cells are notoriously power hungry. As a result, cancer cells must alter their metabolism to provide the additional fuel needed for them to survive, grow and spread. For decades, scientists have been trying to exploit this greedy metabolism as a target f ... more

New insights into the function of the main class of drug targets

About thirty percent of all medical drugs such as beta-blockers or antidepressants interact with certain types of cell surface proteins called G protein coupled receptors. In collaboration with researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute, the group of Prof. Stephan Grzesiek at the Biozentr ... more

Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research. Hepatit ... more

Microscopy: Nine at one blow

Advance in biomedical imaging: The University of Würzburg's Biocenter has enhanced fluorescence microscopy to label and visualise up to nine different cell structures simultaneously. Fluorescence microscopy allows researchers to visualise biomolecules in cells. They label the molecules usi ... more

Biomolecule’s behaviour under artificial conditions more natural than expected

Researchers often analyse isolated biomolecules in test tubes, and it is doubtful if the results can be applied to densely-packed cells. A team from Bochum, Dortmund and Greifswald monitored the folding of an RNA structure in the living cell and compared the results with those of test tube ... more

'Gene fusion' mutation uses 3-way mechanism to drive childhood brain cancers

A powerful, three-way mechanism by which a mutation drives the growth of childhood brain cancers, was discovered by scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The team hopes the discovery will lead to ... more

Risk of lead poisoning from urban gardening is low, new study finds

Using compost is the single best thing you can do to protect your family from any danger associated with lead in urban soils. Good compost will also guarantee that you will have plenty of vegetables to harvest. The University of Washington-led study looked at potential risks associated with ... more

What goes wrong in the brain when someone can't spell

By studying stroke victims who have lost the ability to spell, researchers have pinpointed the parts of the brain that control how we write words. Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists link basic spelling difficulties for the first time with damage to seemingly unrelated regions of the b ... more

Clip-on device offers protection against mosquitoes that transmit Zika

A product called the OFF! ® Clip-On ™ repellent device could be an effective tool for preventing bites from the Aedes aegypti mosquito -- the primary vector of Zika, chikungunya, dengue, and yellow fever. The OFF! Clip-On repels mosquitoes by releasing a vapor form of insecticide through a ... more

All news

New insights into the function of the main class of drug targets

About thirty percent of all medical drugs such as beta-blockers or antidepressants interact with certain types of cell surface proteins called G protein coupled receptors. In collaboration with researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute, the group of Prof. Stephan Grzesiek at the Biozentr ... more

Biomolecule’s behaviour under artificial conditions more natural than expected

Researchers often analyse isolated biomolecules in test tubes, and it is doubtful if the results can be applied to densely-packed cells. A team from Bochum, Dortmund and Greifswald monitored the folding of an RNA structure in the living cell and compared the results with those of test tube ... more

'Gene fusion' mutation uses 3-way mechanism to drive childhood brain cancers

A powerful, three-way mechanism by which a mutation drives the growth of childhood brain cancers, was discovered by scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The team hopes the discovery will lead to ... more

Suitable Protein Tags for Nanoscopy

Modern optical technologies such as super-resolution nanoscopy enable to exactly image small structures and molecular processes, therefore, providing a fascinating view into living cells. To visualize such processes in the nanometer range, cellular structures of interest have to be efficien ... more

The device with the fine nose

When it comes to measuring the smallest traces of volatile chemical compounds in the air, the analysis devices in Pablo Sinues' laboratory are among the most sensitive in the world. They can find the proverbial needle in a haystack: the detection limit for airborne volatile compounds is aro ... more

Sweating for science

A team of researchers has combined two separate technologies to create a health-monitoring device that is noninvasive, doesn't interfere with strenuous outdoor activities and can continuously track a user's health at the molecular level. The two-part system of flexible sensors and a flexibl ... more

Drugs and other contaminants found in private drinking wells on Cape Cod

Recent news about tainted water in Flint, Michigan, and other parts of the country have called into question the safety of the nation's drinking water supply. Adding to this, a new study finds that pollutants from household wastewater--pharmaceuticals and consumer product chemicals--can mak ... more

New study creates first 3-D vision of cancer target

A team from the University of Leicester has for the first time published a detailed description of a protein linked to many types of cancer. The lab-based study from the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology now provides an opportunity for scientists to develop drugs to target this prote ... more

Will blocking IL-17A help treat kidney disease?

Many different diseases and insults can injure kidneys, resulting in kidney failure. Some autoimmune diseases damage glomeruli (the 'filtering units' of the kidney), while problems with the tubules (for example, impaired blood flow to the kidney at the time of renal transplantation, radio-c ... more

Exact pol(e) position

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, working with colleagues from the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, have developed a method for the thorough analysis of protein modifications. They mapped the phosphorylation sites of the RNA polymerase II enzyme, which is responsible for e ... more

All news on bioanalytics

New scaffold-free 3-D bioprinting available

Cell Applications, Inc. and Cyfuse Biomedical K.K. have announced that advanced tissue-engineering services are now available in North America using a groundbreaking new three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting approach called the "Kenzan Method." Utilizing Cyfuse Biomedical's Regenova® 3D Bio Pr ... more

Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research. Hepatit ... more

Sartorius Grows by Double Digits

Sartorius grew very dynamically again in 2015 according to its preliminary figures and further increased its profitability. The company achieved or exceeded its financial targets raised during the reporting year. For the current fiscal year as well, management expects to record significant ... more

Disruptions to embryonic reprogramming alter adult mouse behavior

Right after fertilization, embryos at the earliest stages of development tell their genes: "Forget what it was like in the sperm or egg where you came from." When the process of epigenetic reprogramming is defective in mouse development, the consequences in adulthood can include abnormal re ... more

Seaweed offers the solution to transporting stem cells and wound treatment

Che Connon, Professor of Tissue Engineering at Newcastle University explains: "The stem cells are surrounded by an alginate gel which protects them from the environment -- a bit like frogspawn. We found them unchanged even after three days at room temperature. "This has lots of advantages a ... more

New biomarker to assess stem cells developed

A research team led by scientists from UCL have found a way to assess the viability of 'manufactured' stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The team's discovery offers a new way to fast-track screening methods used in stem cell research. iPSCs are derived from cells, u ... more

New each week: Customized industry information on chemistry, life sciences and analytics

With the new year getting under way, there is great news for all those who look for up-to-date news and information from the chemical, life sciences and analytics industries: the newsletters of CHEMIE.DE’s industry portals have been completely overhauled. As before, they feature current ind ... more

Cellulose nanogenerators could one day power implanted biomedical devices

Implantable electronics that can deliver drugs, monitor vital signs and perform other health-related roles are on the horizon. But finding a way to power them remains a challenge. Now scientists have built a flexible nanogenerator out of cellulose, an abundant natural material, that could p ... more

Biodiesel From Cellulosic Sugars

ExxonMobil, a global leader in advanced biofuels research, announced an agreement with Renewable Energy Group, Inc. (REG) to study the production of biodiesel by fermenting renewable cellulosic sugars from sources such as agricultural waste. The agreement is between ExxonMobil Research and ... more

New study creates first 3-D vision of cancer target

A team from the University of Leicester has for the first time published a detailed description of a protein linked to many types of cancer. The lab-based study from the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology now provides an opportunity for scientists to develop drugs to target this prote ... more

All news on biotechnology

'Gene fusion' mutation uses 3-way mechanism to drive childhood brain cancers

A powerful, three-way mechanism by which a mutation drives the growth of childhood brain cancers, was discovered by scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The team hopes the discovery will lead to ... more

Suitable Protein Tags for Nanoscopy

Modern optical technologies such as super-resolution nanoscopy enable to exactly image small structures and molecular processes, therefore, providing a fascinating view into living cells. To visualize such processes in the nanometer range, cellular structures of interest have to be efficien ... more

New biomarker to assess stem cells developed

A research team led by scientists from UCL have found a way to assess the viability of 'manufactured' stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The team's discovery offers a new way to fast-track screening methods used in stem cell research. iPSCs are derived from cells, u ... more

PerkinElmer acquires Vanadis Diagnostics

PerkinElmer, Inc., announced that it has completed the acquisition of Vanadis Diagnostics, AB. Based in Sweden, Vanadis is developing a novel solution for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) based on digital analysis of cell-free DNA. The acquisition is anticipated to build upon PerkinElme ... more

1 in 7 colorectal cancer patients diagnosed before recommended screening age

Nearly 15 percent of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were younger than 50, the age at which screening recommendations begin. The study by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center also found that younger patients were more likely to have advanced diseas ... more

Will blocking IL-17A help treat kidney disease?

Many different diseases and insults can injure kidneys, resulting in kidney failure. Some autoimmune diseases damage glomeruli (the 'filtering units' of the kidney), while problems with the tubules (for example, impaired blood flow to the kidney at the time of renal transplantation, radio-c ... more

Researchers pinpoint place where cancer cells may begin

Cancer cells are normal cells that go awry by making bad developmental decisions during their lives. In a study involving the fruit fly equivalent of an oncogene implicated in many human leukemias, Northwestern University researchers have gained insight into how developing cells normally sw ... more

To hear a pitter patter from afar

Heartbeats can now be measured without placing sensors on the body, thanks to a new technology developed in Japan. Researchers at the Kyoto University Center of Innovation, together with Panasonic Corp, have come up with a way to measure heartbeats remotely, in real time, and under controll ... more

Agilent Technologies extends agreement with PerkinElmer on bioanalyzer chips

Agilent Technologies Inc.announced an extension to its longstanding agreement with PerkinElmer, which supplies chips for Agilent’s popular 2100 Bioanalyzer system. Since its introduction in 1999, the 2100 Bioanalyzer system has become an integral part of molecular biology laboratories aroun ... more

Research finds possible answer to why some develop Alzheimer’s - and others don’t

Alzheimer’s disease affects millions, but there is no cure and no real test for the diagnosis until death, when an examination of the brain can reveal the amyloid plaques that are a telltale characteristic of the disease. Interestingly, the same plaque deposits have also been found in the b ... more

All news on diagnostics

Sartorius Grows by Double Digits

Sartorius grew very dynamically again in 2015 according to its preliminary figures and further increased its profitability. The company achieved or exceeded its financial targets raised during the reporting year. For the current fiscal year as well, management expects to record significant ... more

The device with the fine nose

When it comes to measuring the smallest traces of volatile chemical compounds in the air, the analysis devices in Pablo Sinues' laboratory are among the most sensitive in the world. They can find the proverbial needle in a haystack: the detection limit for airborne volatile compounds is aro ... more

New nanomanufacturing technique advances imaging, biosensing technology

More than a decade ago, theorists predicted the possibility of a nanolens--a chain of three nanoscale spheres that would focus incoming light into a spot much smaller than possible with conventional microscopy. Such a device would make possible extremely high-resolution imaging or biologica ... more

BioFluidix wins STEP award

Increasing the speed, safety and cost efficiency of sample analysis: BioFluidix wins the process-category price at the 2015 STEP Award with its PipeJet Tip pipetting technology. Once per year, Infraserv Höchst KG and the F.A.Z. – Institute honor innovative and strongly growing companies of ... more

Analytik Jena Opens Swiss Branch Office at the Endress+Hauser Headquarters

Analytik Jena AG has established a branch office on the premises of Endress+Hauser at the Reinach site near Basel in Switzerland. “This step is part of our strategy to further expand our international sales structure and to establish our own organization and direct sales wherever tangible g ... more

Sartorius grows

Sartorius closed the first nine months of 2015 with significant double-digit gains in order intake, sales revenue and earnings. Group order intake rose 19.9%, excluding currency effects, to 856.6 million euros; the reported figure surged 30.2%. Its sales revenue climbed 18.5% in constant cu ... more

Successful launch of BIOTECHNICA and LABVOLUTION

The producers of the BIOTECHNICA and LABVOLUTION dual exhibition drew positive conclusions at the close of the event. Some 10,000 trade visitors traveled to Hannover to take advantage of the business opportunities offered by BIOTECHNICA as the European networking hub for bio¬technology and ... more

Analytik Jena AG Expands Executive Management Board

At a meeting in September, the Supervisory Board of Analytik Jena AG made the decision to expand the Company’s Executive Board. In this way, the Company is responding to its growth and the ever-increasing challenges associated with its operational business. The management body of the Jena-b ... more

New smart robot accelerates cancer treatment research

A new smart research robot accelerates research on cancer treatments. The new robot system finds optimal treatment combinations. Today complex diseases like cancer is medically almost exclusively treated by combining several different drugs. These combinations are typically composed from dr ... more

Eppendorf supports the smartLAB project

Eppendorf AG will be presenting the incorporation of its laboratory devices and consumables into digitalized work processes at the smartLab stand. The advantages of topics such as documentation, process monitoring and automation of repeatedly performed tasks in the laboratory are illustrate ... more

All news on lab technology

New insights into the function of the main class of drug targets

About thirty percent of all medical drugs such as beta-blockers or antidepressants interact with certain types of cell surface proteins called G protein coupled receptors. In collaboration with researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute, the group of Prof. Stephan Grzesiek at the Biozentr ... more

Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research. Hepatit ... more

Sartorius Grows by Double Digits

Sartorius grew very dynamically again in 2015 according to its preliminary figures and further increased its profitability. The company achieved or exceeded its financial targets raised during the reporting year. For the current fiscal year as well, management expects to record significant ... more

New research uses nanotechnology to prevent preterm birth

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers has demonstrated in mice a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. Jerrie S. Refuerzo, M.D., of the University of Texas Medical School at Houston (UTHealth) wa ... more

Drug that could aid in vaccines activates innate immune system in novel way

A new drug with the potential to aid in vaccine development has been identified by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center. "The drug we made appears safe, and boosts immunity in mice. Therefore, the drug, which is straightforward to synthesize and to couple to antigens that induce an ... more

Seaweed offers the solution to transporting stem cells and wound treatment

Che Connon, Professor of Tissue Engineering at Newcastle University explains: "The stem cells are surrounded by an alginate gel which protects them from the environment -- a bit like frogspawn. We found them unchanged even after three days at room temperature. "This has lots of advantages a ... more

Graphene shown to safely interact with neurons in the brain

Researchers have successfully demonstrated how it is possible to interface graphene - a two-dimensional form of carbon - with neurons, or nerve cells, while maintaining the integrity of these vital cells. The work may be used to build graphene-based electrodes that can safely be implanted i ... more

Cancer research: Enzyme inhibition with a surprise

In many tumours specific enzymes involved in regulating gene activity are heavily mutated. What effect could that have? Cell researchers from the University of Würzburg have looked into this question. Matthias Becker and Professor Albrecht Müller, two molecular biologists from the Julius-Ma ... more

Ablynx to receive milestone for bi-specific nanobody in oncology

Ablynx announced that Boehringer Ingelheim has administered the first dose in a Phase I dose escalation study with the half-life extended bi-specific anti-VEGF/Ang2 Nanobody® in adult patients with advanced solid tumors, triggering an €8 million milestone payment to Ablynx. The aim of the s ... more

Too-few proteins prompt nanoparticles to clump

Blood serum proteins have been observed combining one-to-one with gold nanoparticles and prompting them to aggregate, scientists at Rice University reported. This is unexpected, according to Rice researchers Stephan Link and Christy Landes, who have led studies of the proteins most responsi ... more

All news on pharma

New scaffold-free 3-D bioprinting available

Cell Applications, Inc. and Cyfuse Biomedical K.K. have announced that advanced tissue-engineering services are now available in North America using a groundbreaking new three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting approach called the "Kenzan Method." Utilizing Cyfuse Biomedical's Regenova® 3D Bio Pr ... more

Nutrient deprivation kills kidney cancer cells

All cells need nutrients, but cancer cells are notoriously power hungry. As a result, cancer cells must alter their metabolism to provide the additional fuel needed for them to survive, grow and spread. For decades, scientists have been trying to exploit this greedy metabolism as a target f ... more

Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research. Hepatit ... more

'Gene fusion' mutation uses 3-way mechanism to drive childhood brain cancers

A powerful, three-way mechanism by which a mutation drives the growth of childhood brain cancers, was discovered by scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The team hopes the discovery will lead to ... more

What goes wrong in the brain when someone can't spell

By studying stroke victims who have lost the ability to spell, researchers have pinpointed the parts of the brain that control how we write words. Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists link basic spelling difficulties for the first time with damage to seemingly unrelated regions of the b ... more

Clip-on device offers protection against mosquitoes that transmit Zika

A product called the OFF! ® Clip-On ™ repellent device could be an effective tool for preventing bites from the Aedes aegypti mosquito -- the primary vector of Zika, chikungunya, dengue, and yellow fever. The OFF! Clip-On repels mosquitoes by releasing a vapor form of insecticide through a ... more

Disruptions to embryonic reprogramming alter adult mouse behavior

Right after fertilization, embryos at the earliest stages of development tell their genes: "Forget what it was like in the sperm or egg where you came from." When the process of epigenetic reprogramming is defective in mouse development, the consequences in adulthood can include abnormal re ... more

The benefits of chocolate during pregnancy

In a study to be presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, High-flavanol chocolate to improve placental function and to decrease the risk of preeclampsia: a double blind r ... more

Cancer research: Enzyme inhibition with a surprise

In many tumours specific enzymes involved in regulating gene activity are heavily mutated. What effect could that have? Cell researchers from the University of Würzburg have looked into this question. Matthias Becker and Professor Albrecht Müller, two molecular biologists from the Julius-Ma ... more

Suitable Protein Tags for Nanoscopy

Modern optical technologies such as super-resolution nanoscopy enable to exactly image small structures and molecular processes, therefore, providing a fascinating view into living cells. To visualize such processes in the nanometer range, cellular structures of interest have to be efficien ... more

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