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Behavioral neurology



Neuropsychology


Topics

Brain-computer interfacesBrain damage
Brain regions • Clinical neuropsychology
Cognitive neuroscience • Human brain
Neuroanatomy • Neurophysiology
Phrenology • Common misconceptions

Brain functions

arousal • attention
consciousness • decision making
executive functions • language
learning • memory
motor coordination • perception
planning • problem solving
thought

People

Arthur L. Benton• David Bohm
António DamásioKenneth Heilman
Phineas Gage • Norman Geschwind
Elkhonon Goldberg • Donald Hebb
Alexander Luria • Muriel D. Lezak •
Brenda MilnerKarl Pribram
Oliver SacksRoger Sperry• H.M.

Tests

Bender-Gestalt Test
Benton Visual Retention Test
Clinical Dementia Rating
Continuous Performance Task
Glasgow Coma Scale
Hayling and Brixton tests
Lexical decision task
Mini-mental state examination
Stroop effect
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale
Wisconsin card sorting task

Mind and Brain Portal
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Behavioral neurology is a subspecialty of neurology that studies the neurological basis of behavior, memory, and cognition, the impact of neurological damage and disease upon these functions, and the treatment thereof. Two fields associated with behavioral neurology are neuropsychiatry and neuropsychology. Syndromes and diseases commonly studied by behavioral neurology include but are not limited to:

Additional recommended knowledge

History

While descriptions of behavioral syndromes go back to the ancient Greeks and Egyptians, it was during the 19th century that behavioral neurology began to arise, first with the primitive localization theories of Franz Gall, followed in the mid 19th century by the first localizations in aphasias by Paul Broca and then Carl Wernicke. Localizationist neurology and clinical descriptions reached a peak in the late 19th and early 20th century, with work extending into the clinical descriptions of dementias by Alois Alzheimer and Arnold Pick. The work of Karl Lashley in rats for a time in the early to mid 20th century put a damper on localization theory and lesion models of behavioral function. In the United States, the work of Norman Geschwind led to a renaissance of behavioral neurology. Geschwind is famous for his work on disconnection syndromes and his legacy lives on through the generations of behavioral neurologists trained by Dr. Geschwind and his former fellows. The advent of in vivo neuroimaging starting in the 1980s led to a further strengthing of interest in the cognitive neurosciences and provided a tool that allowed for lesion, structural, and functional correlations with behavioral dysfunction in living people.

References

  • Benson DF. The History of Behavioral Neurology. Neurol Clin. 1993 Feb;11(1):1-8.
  • Martha J. Farah, Todd E. Feinberg; Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychology; McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing; 1st edition (August 1, 1996)
  • Kenneth M. Heilman, Edward Valenstein; Clinical Neuropsychology; Oxford University Press, USA; 4th edition (February 5, 2003)

Neuroscience subfields:

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Behavioral Neurology | Biological Psychology | Cognitive Neuroscience | Cognitive Psychophysiology | Computational Neuroscience | Molecular Cellular Cognition | Neural Engineering | Neuroanatomy | Neurobiology | Neurochemistry | Neuroendocrinology | Neuroimaging | Neurolinguistics | Neurology | Neuromonitoring | Neuropharmacology | Neurophysiology | Neuropsychology | Neuropsychiatry | Neurosurgery | Psychiatry | Psychobiology | Psychopharmacology | Psychophysiology | Systems Neuroscience

Psychology subfields:

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Behavioral Neurology | Cognitive Psychology | Cognitive Neuroscience | Biological Psychology | Neuroimaging | Psycholinguistics | Psychophysics | Psychophysiology | Neuropsychology | Neuropsychiatry | Psychopharmacology | Systems Neuroscience | Mathematical Psychology | Developmental Psychology | Social Psychology | Clinical Psychology | Evolutionary Psychology | Forensic Psychology | Experimental Psychology
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Behavioral_neurology". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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