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António Damásio



Neuropsychology


Topics

Brain-computer interfacesBrain damage
Brain regions • Clinical neuropsychology
Cognitive neuroscience • Human brain
Neuroanatomy • Neurophysiology
Phrenology • Common misconceptions

Brain functions

arousal • attention
consciousness • decision making
executive functions • language
learning • memory
motor coordination • perception
planning • problem solving
thought

People

Arthur L. Benton• David Bohm
António DamásioKenneth Heilman
Phineas Gage • Norman Geschwind
Elkhonon Goldberg • Donald Hebb
Alexander Luria • Muriel D. Lezak •
Brenda MilnerKarl Pribram
Oliver SacksRoger Sperry• H.M.

Tests

Bender-Gestalt Test
Benton Visual Retention Test
Clinical Dementia Rating
Continuous Performance Task
Glasgow Coma Scale
Hayling and Brixton tests
Lexical decision task
Mini-mental state examination
Stroop effect
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale
Wisconsin card sorting task

Mind and Brain Portal
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António Damásio, GOSE, pron. IPA: [ɐ̃'tɔniu dɐ'maziu], (IPA: [ɐ̃'tɔniu dɐ'maziu]) (b. 1944, Lisbon) is a Portuguese behavioral neurologist and neuroscientist working in the United States. He is David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Southern California, where he heads USC's Brain and Creativity Institute. Prior to taking up his posts at USC, in 2005, Damásio was M.W. Van Allen Professor and Head of Neurology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. His career at Iowa lasted from 1976-2005. Besides being a well-known researcher in several areas of the neurology, he is a best-selling author of books which describe his scientific thinking.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Life and work

Damásio studied medicine at the University of Lisbon Medical School in Portugal, where he also did his medical residency rotation and completed his doctorate. Later, he moved to the United States as a research fellow at the Aphasia Research Center in Boston. His work there on behavioral neurology was done under the supervision of Norman Geschwind.

As a researcher, Dr. Damásio's main interest is the neurobiology of the mind, especially neural systems which subserve memory, language, emotion, and decision-making. His research has helped to elucidate the neural basis for the emotions and has shown that emotions play a central role in social cognition and decision-making. Damásio has formulated the somatic marker hypothesis.[1]

As a clinician, he and his collaborators study and treat the disorders of behavior and cognition, and movement disorders.

Damásio's books deal with the relationship between emotions and feelings, and what are their bases in the brain. His 1994 book, Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason and the Human Brain, was nominated for the Los Angeles Times Book Award and is translated in over 30 languages. His second book, The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness, was named as one of the ten best books of 2001 by New York Times Book Review, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, a Library Journal Best Book of the Year, and has thirty foreign editions. Damásio's most recent book, Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain, was published in 2003. In it, Damásio explores philosophy and its relations to neurobiology, suggesting that it might provide guidelines for human ethics.

He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Science's Institute of Medicine, and the European Academy of Arts and Sciences. Damásio has received many awards including the Prince of Asturias Award in Science and Technology, Kappers Neuroscience Medal, the Beaumont Medal from the American Medical Association and the Reenpaa Prize in Neuroscience. He is also in the editorial board of many important journals in the field.

His current work involves the social emotions, decision neuroscience and creativity.

Prof. Damásio is married to Dr. Hanna Damásio, his colleague and co-author of several works.

Bibliography

  • Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain 1994
  • The Somatic marker hypothesis and the possible functions of the prefrontal cortex, 1996
  • The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness, 1999
  • Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain, 2003

References

  1. ^ Damásio.A.R. The Somatic marker hypothesis and the possible functions of the prefrontal cortex, 1996

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "António_Damásio". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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