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Altrose



Altrose
IUPAC name 6-(hydroxymethyl)oxane-
2,3,4,5-tetrol
Identifiers
CAS number D:1990-29-0
L:1949-88-8
SMILES O[C@@H]1C(CO)O[C@@H](O)
[C@H](O)[C@@H]1O
Properties
Molecular formula C6H12O6
Molar mass 180.16 g/mol
Melting point

103-105 °C

Except where noted otherwise, data are given for
materials in their standard state
(at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox disclaimer and references

Altrose is an aldohexose sugar. The D isomer is an unnatural monosaccharide. It is soluble in water and practically insoluble in methanol. L-altrose has been isolated from strains of the bacterium Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens.[1]

Additional recommended knowledge

Altrose is a C-3 epimer of mannose.

References

  1. ^ US patent 4966845, "Microbial production of L-altrose", granted 1990-10-30, assigned to Government of the United States of America, Secretary of Agriculture 
  • Merck Index, 11th Edition, 319.
General: Aldose | Ketose | Pyranose | Furanose
Geometry: Triose | Tetrose | Pentose | Hexose | Heptose | Cyclohexane conformation | Anomer | Mutarotation
Small/Large: Glyceraldehyde | Dihydroxyacetone | Erythrose | Threose | Erythrulose | Sedoheptulose
Trioses: ketotriose | Aldotriose
Tetroses: Erythrulose | Erythrose | Threose
Pentoses: Arabinose | Deoxyribose | Lyxose | Ribose | Ribulose | Xylose | Xylulose
Hexoses: Glucose | Galactose | Mannose | Gulose | Idose | Talose | Allose | Altrose | Fructose | Sorbose | Tagatose | Psicose | Fucose | Rhamnose
Disaccharides: Sucrose | Lactose | Trehalose | Maltose
Polymers: Glycogen | Starch (Amylose | Amylopectin) | Cellulose | Chitin | Stachyose | Inulin | Dextrin
Glycosaminoglycans: Heparin | Chondroitin sulfate | Hyaluronan | Heparan sulfate | Dermatan sulfate | Keratan sulfate
Aminoglycosides: Kanamycin | Streptomycin | Tobramycin | Neomycin | Paromomycin | Apramycin | Gentamicin | Netilmicin | Amikacin
  This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Altrose". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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