My watch list
my.bionity.com  
Login  

85 Current news of Stanford University

rss

You can refine your search further. Select from the filter options on the left to narrow down your results.

image description
Allergic immune responses help fight bacterial infections

Exciting discovery could also explain why the body has maintained the “allergy module” throughout evolution

11-Sep-2020

Researchers from CeMM Research Center of Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Medical University of Vienna and Stanford University School of Medicine, have found that a module of the immune system, which is best known for causing allergic reactions, plays a key role in ...

more

image description
How to Put Neurons into Cages

Using an acoustic bioprinting technology it was possible to develop multicellular nerve tissue

05-May-2020

Using microscopically fine 3D printing technologies from TU Wien (Vienna) and sound waves used as tweezers at Stanford University (California), tiny networks of neurons have been created. Microscopically small cages can be produced at TU Wien (Vienna). Their grid openings are only a few ...

more

image description
New CRISPR-based tool can probe and control several genetic circuits at once

Technology allows for greater precision in identifying and treating diseased cells

18-Feb-2020

Every cell in our body has a computer-like control system that sends biological signals through thousands of circuits to monitor the cell's needs and regulate its responses. But when diseases such as cancer arise, these regulatory circuits often go awry, resulting in unnatural signals and ...

more

image description
Pathogens find safe harbor deep in the gastric glands

06-May-2019

Scientists have long tried to understand how pathogenic bacteria like Helicobacter pylori, a risk factor for stomach ulcers and cancer, survive in the harsh environment of the stomach. In a new study in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, researchers led by Connie Fung and Manuel Amieva at ...

more

image description
Protein complex prevents toxic aggregation of proteins

16-Apr-2019

A protein complex within the cell has been found to play a key role in preventing the toxicity of proteins which build up amyloid plaques and can lead to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease. Researchers from the Universities of Konstanz (Germany), Leeds (UK) ...

more

CRISPR-Cas9 corrects sickle cell mutation

Collaborative effort to reduce off-target CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

08-Aug-2018

Genome editing using the CRISPR-Cas9 system has tremendous promise for therapeutic correction of genetic errors in human cells. Prior to adoption as a medical therapeutic, safety concerns relating to off-target effects must be minimized to mitigate risks that may arise from the unintended action ...

more

Wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

24-Jul-2018

The hormone cortisol rises and falls naturally throughout the day and can spike in response to stress, but current methods for measuring cortisol levels require waiting several days for results from a lab. By the time a person learns the results of a cortisol test - which may inform treatment for ...

more

Bacterial armor could be a new target for antibiotics

23-Jul-2018

For over a century, scientists have studied E. coli, one of the bacteria that cause food poisoning, as a model for fighting infections. Such research has led to a variety of antibiotics that penetrate the protective cell walls of bacteria to kill them. Now, a multi-university study led by ...

more

Artificial intelligence helps Stanford researchers predict drug combinations' side effects

11-Jul-2018

Last month alone, 23 percent of Americans took two or more prescription drugs, according to one CDC estimate, and 39 percent over age 65 take five or more, a number that's increased three-fold in the last several decades. And if that isn't surprising enough, try this one: in many cases, doctors ...

more

image description
Making intricate images with bacterial communities

21-Mar-2018

Working with light and genetically engineered bacteria, researchers from Stanford University are able to shape the growth of bacterial communities. From polka dots to stripes to circuits, they can render intricate designs overnight. The technique can achieve biofilms grown at a resolution of 25 ...

more

Page 1 From 9
Subscribe to e-mail updates relating to your search

You will receive via e-mail the latest search results matching your search criteria. This service is free of charge and can be cancelled at any time.

Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE