21-Jan-2022 - John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Does coffee help protect against endometrial cancer?

Caffeinated coffee may provide better protection than decaffeinated coffee

Higher coffee consumption is linked with a lower risk of endometrial cancer, a type of cancer that begins in the lining of uterus, according to an analysis of relevant studies published to date. Also, caffeinated coffee may provide better protection than decaffeinated coffee.

The analysis, which appears in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research, included 24 studies on coffee intake with 9,833 new cases of endometrial cancer occurring in 699,234 individuals.

People in the highest category of coffee intake had a 29% lower relative risk of developing endometrial cancer than those in the lowest category.

The authors of the analysis highlight several mechanisms that have been associated with the potential anti-cancer effects of coffee. “Further studies with large sample size are needed… to obtain more information regarding the benefits of coffee drinking in relation to the risk of endometrial cancer,” they wrote.

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