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Toxic metal



Part of a series on
Toxicology and poison
Toxicology (Forensic) - Toxinology
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Toxic metals are metals that form poisonous soluble compounds and have no biological role, i.e. are not essential minerals, or are in the wrong form[1]. Often heavy metals are thought as synonymous, but lighter metals also have toxicity, as exemplified by beryllium, and not all heavy metals are particularly toxic and some are even essential (such as iron). The definition may also include trace elements when considered in abnormally high, toxic doses. A difference is that there is no beneficial dose for a toxic metal with no biological role.

Additional recommended knowledge

Toxic metals sometimes imitate the action of an essential element in the body, interfering with the metabolic process to cause illness. Many metals, particularly heavy metals are toxic, but some heavy metals are essential, have a low toxicity, and bismuth is even non-toxic. Most often the definition includes at least cadmium, lead, mercury and the radioactive metals.[citation needed] Metalloids (arsenic, polonium) may be included in the definition. Radioactive metals have both radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity. Metals in an oxidation state abnormal to the body may also become toxic: chromium(III) is an essential trace element, but chromium(VI) is a carcinogen. The toxicity of any metal depends on its ligands.

Toxicity is a function of solubility. Insoluble compounds as well as the metallic forms often exhibit negligible toxicity. In some cases, organometallic forms, such as dimethyl mercury and tetraethyl lead, can be extremely toxic. In other cases, organometallic derivatives are less toxic such as cobaltocenium cation.

Decontamination for toxic metals is different from organic toxins: because toxic metals are elements, they cannot be destroyed. Toxic metals may be made insoluble or collected, possibly by the aid of chelating agents.

Toxic metals can bioaccumulate in the body and in the food chain. The exceptions are barium and aluminum. Therefore, a common characteristic of toxic metals is the chronic nature of their toxicity.

Toxic metals:

Trace elements with toxicity:[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ http://www.dartmouth.edu/~toxmetal/TX.shtml
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Toxic_metal". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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