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HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia



As part of the global AIDS pandemic, there is also growing concern about a rapidly growing epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, where an estimated 0.99-2.3 million people were infected in September 2006, though the adult (15-49) prevalence rate is low (0.9%). The rate of HIV infections began to grow rapidly from the mid-1990s, due to social and economic collapse, increased levels of intravenous drug use and increased numbers of prostitutes.

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Russia

Main article: HIV/AIDS in Russia

By 2004 the number of reported cases in Russia was over 257,000, according to the World Health Organization, up from 15,000 in 1995 and 190,000 in 2002; some estimates claim the real number is up to five times higher, over 1 million. There are predictions that the infection rate in Russia will continue to rise quickly, since education there about AIDS is almost non-existent.

Ukraine and Estonia

Ukraine and Estonia also had growing numbers of infected people, with estimates of 500,000 and 3,700 respectively in 2005. The epidemic is still in its early stages in this region, which means that prevention strategies may be able to halt and reverse this epidemic. However, transmission of HIV is increasing through sexual contact and drug use among the young (<30 years). Indeed, over 80% of current infections occur in this region in people less than 30 years of age.

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This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "HIV/AIDS_in_Eastern_Europe_and_Central_Asia". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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