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Dopamine agonist



  A dopamine agonist is a compound that activates dopamine receptors, mimicking the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Uses

Some medical drugs act as dopamine agonists; they are typically used for treating Parkinson's disease and certain Pituitary tumors (prolactinomas), and may be useful for restless legs syndrome (RLS). Both Requip (Ropinirole) and Mirapex (Pramipexole) are FDA approved for the treatment of RLS.

There is also an ongoing clinical trial to test the effectiveness of Requip (Ropinirole), a dopamine agonist, in reversing the symptoms of SSRI induced sexual dysfunction. [1]

Examples

Examples of dopamine agonists include:

See also

References

  1. ^ ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00334048 - "Treating Sexual Dysfunction From SSRI Medication: a Study Comparing Requip CR to Placebo"
  2. ^ http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01596.html
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Dopamine_agonist". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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