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Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva



Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva
Classification & external resources
Aorta laid open to show the semilunar valves. (Aortic sinus, also known as "sinus of Valsalva", is labeled at upper right.)
ICD-10 Q25.4
(EUROCAT Q25.43)
DiseasesDB 32260
eMedicine med/2133  ped/2106

'Aneurysm of the aortic sinus', also known as the sinus of Valsalva, is comparatively rare, occurring in about one person in every thousand.[citation needed] When present, it is usually in either the right (65-85%) or in the noncoronary (10-30%) sinus, rarely in the left (< 5%) sinus. This type of aneurysm is typically congenital and may be associated with heart defects. It is sometimes associated with Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome, but may also result from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, atherosclerosis, syphilis, cystic medial necrosis, chest injury, or infective endocarditis.

Additional recommended knowledge

If unruptured, this type aneurysm may be asymptomatic and therefore go undetected until symptoms appear or medical imaging is performed for other reasons.

Treatment

Medical therapy of aneurysm of the aortic sinus includes blood pressure control through the use of drugs, such as beta blockers. The definitive treatment is surgical repair. The determination to perform surgery is usually based upon the diameter of the aortic root and the rate of increase in its size, as determined through repeated echocardiography. In 2005, NBA basketball players Ronny Turiaf and Fred Hoiberg underwent successful surgery to correct enlarged aortic roots.

See also


 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Aneurysm_of_sinus_of_Valsalva". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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