My watch list
my.bionity.com  
Login  

Folliculitis



Folliculitis
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 L73.9 (ILDS L73.91)
ICD-9 704.8
DiseasesDB 31367
MedlinePlus 000823
eMedicine derm/159 
MeSH D005499

Folliculitis is the inflammation of one or more hair follicles. The condition may occur anywhere on the skin.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Causes

Most carbuncles and furuncles and other cases of folliculitis develop from Staphylococcus aureus.

Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged by friction from clothing, blockage of the follicle, or shaving. In most cases of folliculitis, the damaged follicles are then infected with the bacteria Staphylococcus (staph).

Iron deficiency anemia is sometimes associated with chronic cases

  • Sycosis barbae or Barber's itch is a staph infection of the hair follicles in the bearded area of the face, usually the upper lip. Shaving aggravates the condition.
  • Tinea barbae is similar to barber's itch, but the infection is caused by the fungus T._rubrum.
  • Pseudofolliculitis barbae is a disorder occurring primarily in men of African descent. If curly beard hairs are cut too short, they may curve back into the skin and cause inflammation.
  • Hot tub folliculitis is caused by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa often found in new hot tubs.[1] The folliculitis usually occurs after sitting in a hot tub that was not properly cleaned before use. Symptoms are found around the body parts that sit in the hot tub -- typically the legs, hips and buttocks and surrounding areas. Symptoms are typically amplified around regions that were covered by wet clothing, such as bathing suits.

Symptoms

  • rash (reddened skin area)
  • pimples or pustules located around a hair follicle
    • may crust over
    • typically occur on neck axilla, or groin area
    • may be present as genital lesions
  • itching skin

Treatment

  1. Topical antiseptic treatment is adequate for most cases
  2. Some patients may benefit from systemic flucloxacillin
  3. Topical antibiotics such as mupirocin ointment

Exfoliation is a common fix to the condition

See also

References

  1. ^ Medline Plus (NIH) article on Hot tub folliculitis
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Folliculitis". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE