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Falx cerebri



Brain: Falx cerebri
Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull and the brain.
Diagrammatic representation of a section across the top of the skull, showing the membranes of the brain, etc. (Falx cerebri is yellow line running down center.)
Gray's subject #193 873
Part of Meninges
NeuroNames ancil-258

The falx cerebri, so named from its sickle-like form, is a strong, arched fold of dura mater which descends vertically in the longitudinal fissure between the cerebral hemispheres.

Additional recommended knowledge

It is narrow in front, where it is attached to the crista galli of the ethmoid; and broad behind, where it is connected with the upper surface of the tentorium cerebelli.

Its upper margin is convex, and attached to the inner surface of the skull in the middle line, as far back as the internal occipital protuberance; it contains the superior sagittal sinus. Its lower margin is free and concave, and contains the inferior sagittal sinus.

Additional images

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Falx_cerebri". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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