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Pop science: Stanford engineers stop soap bubbles from swirling

The spinning rainbow surface of a soap bubble is more than mesmerizing – it’s a lesson in fluid mechanics. Better understanding of these hypnotic flows could bring improvements in many areas, from longer lasting beer foam to life-saving lung treatments.

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More about Stanford University
  • Videos

    The Neuroscience of Learning

    Bruce McCandliss, professor in Stanford’s Graduate School of Education and the director of the Stanford Center for Mind, Brain and Computation, speaks about brain-imaging technology that is revolutionizing the study of educational experiences and their effect on the brain. more

    Stanford scientists produce cancer drug in a plant

    A common cancer drug was discovered in a Himalayan plant, and until now that plant was the only source of the drug. Now, a Stanford chemical engineer has identified the 10 drug-making enzymes and placed them into another plant that is easier to grow in the lab. This is the first step to bei ... more

  • News

    Allergic immune responses help fight bacterial infections

    Researchers from CeMM Research Center of Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Medical University of Vienna and Stanford University School of Medicine, have found that a module of the immune system, which is best known for causing allergic reactions, plays a key role i ... more

    How to Put Neurons into Cages

    Using microscopically fine 3D printing technologies from TU Wien (Vienna) and sound waves used as tweezers at Stanford University (California), tiny networks of neurons have been created. Microscopically small cages can be produced at TU Wien (Vienna). Their grid openings are only a few mic ... more

    New CRISPR-based tool can probe and control several genetic circuits at once

    Every cell in our body has a computer-like control system that sends biological signals through thousands of circuits to monitor the cell's needs and regulate its responses. But when diseases such as cancer arise, these regulatory circuits often go awry, resulting in unnatural signals and r ... more

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