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Yersinia pseudotuberculosis



Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Bacteria
Phylum: Proteobacteria
Class: Gamma Proteobacteria
Order: Enterobacteriales
Family: Enterobacteriaceae
Genus: Yersinia
Species: Y. pseudotuberculosis
Binomial name
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
(Pfeiffer 1889)
Smith & Thal 1965

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a Gram-negative bacterium which primarily causes disease in animals; humans occasionally get infected zoonotically, most often through the food-borne route.[1]

Additional recommended knowledge

Pathogenesis

In animals, Y. pseudotuberculosis can cause tuberculosis-like symptoms, including localized tissue necrosis and granulomas in the spleen, liver, and lymph node.

In humans, symptoms are similar to those of infection with Y. enterocolitica (fever and right-sided abdominal pain), except that the diarrheal component is often absent, which sometimes makes the resulting condition difficult to diagnose. Y. pseudotuberculosis infections can mimic appendicitis, especially in children and younger adults, and, in rare cases the disease may cause skin complaints (erythema nodosum), joint stiffness and pain (reactive arthritis), or spread of bacteria to the blood (bacteremia).

Infection usually becomes apparent 5–10 days after exposure and typically lasts 1–3 weeks without treatment. In complex cases or those involving immunocompromised patients, antibiotics may be necessary for resolution; ampicillin, aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, or a cephalosporin may all be effective.

The recently described syndrome Izumi-fever has been linked to infection with Y.pseudotuberculosis.[2]

References

  1. ^ Ryan KJ; Ray CG (editors) (2004). Sherris Medical Microbiology, 4th ed., McGraw Hill. ISBN 0-8385-8529-9. 
  2. ^ Jani, Asim (2003). Pseudotuberculosis (Yersina). Retrieved on 2006-03-04.


 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Yersinia_pseudotuberculosis". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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