My watch list
my.bionity.com  
Login  

Pain management



Pain management (also called pain medicine) is the discipline concerned with the relief of pain.

Additional recommended knowledge

Acute pain, such as occurs with trauma, often has a reversible cause and may require only transient measures and correction of the underlying problem. In contrast, chronic pain often results from conditions that are difficult to diagnose and treat, and that may take a long time to reverse. Some examples include cancer, neuropathy, and referred pain. Often, pain pathways are set up that continue to transmit the sensation of pain even though the underlying condition or injury that originally caused pain has been healed. In such situations, the pain itself is frequently managed separately from the underlying condition of which it is a symptom, or the goal of treatment is to manage the pain with no treatment of any underlying condition (e.g. if the underlying condition has resolved or if no identifiable source of the pain can be found).

Pain management generally benefits from a multidisciplinary approach that includes pharmacologic measures (analgesics such as narcotics or NSAIDs and pain modifiers such as tricyclic antidepressants or anticonvulsants), non-pharmacologic measures (such as interventional procedures, physical therapy and physical exercise, application of ice and/or heat), and psychological measures (such as biofeedback and cognitive therapy).

Pain management practitioners come from all fields of medicine. Most often, pain fellowship trained physicians are anesthesiologists, neurologists, physiatrists or psychiatrists. Some practitioners focus more on the pharmacologic management of the patient, while others are very proficient at the interventional management of pain. Interventional procedures - typically used for chronic back pain - include: epidural steroid injections, facet joint injections, neurolytic blocks, Spinal Cord Stimulators and intrathecal drug delivery system implants, etc. Over the last several years the number of interventional procedures done for pain has grown to a very large number.

As well as medical practitioners, the area of pain management may often benefit from the input of Physiotherapists, Chiropractors, Clinical Psychologists & Occupational therapists, amongst others. Together the multidisciplinary team can help create a package of care suitable to the patient. One of the pain management modalities are trigger point injections and nerve blocks utilizing long acting anesthetics and small doses of steroids.

See also

  • International Association for the Study of Pain
  • Pain Management Resources: PainEdu
  • Barry Yeoman, Prisoners of Pain, AARP: The Magazine
  • American chronic pain association
  • Pain Management Information. Alternative & Conventional Treatments
  • Chronic pain support group
  • Online postgrad courses in Pain management at University of Edinburgh following the
  • Find Pain Management Treatment Programs
  • Pain Talk: The national discussion forum and community for UK Healthcare Professionals with an interest in acute, chronic, or palliative Pain Management. Features articles on pain management, and a range of resources
  This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Pain_management". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE