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Nitazoxanide



Nitazoxanide
Systematic (IUPAC) name
[2-[(5-nitro-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)carbamoyl]phenyl]ethanoate
Identifiers
CAS number 55981-09-4
ATC code P01AX11
PubChem 41684
DrugBank APRD00558
Chemical data
Formula C12H9N3O5S 
Mol. mass 307.283 g/mol
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability  ?
Protein binding 99%
Metabolism Hydrolyzed to tizoxanide
Half life  ?
Excretion Renal, biliary and fecal
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.

B(US)

Legal status

-only(US)

Routes Oral (tablets and suspension)

Nitazoxanide, also known by the brand names Alinia and Annita, is a synthetic nitrothiazolyl-salicylamide derivative and an antiprotozoal agent. It is approved for the treatment of infectious diarrhea caused by Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in patients 1 year of age and older.

Nitazoxanide is currently in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of hepatitis C, in combination with peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin.[1][2]

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Adverse effects

Side effects are mostly gastrointestinal, and include abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea.

Pharmacokinetics

Nitazoxanide is a prodrug. Following oral administration, it is rapidly hydrolyzed to its active metabolite, tizoxanide, which is 99% protein bound. Peak concentrations are observed 1–4 hours after administration. It is excreted in the urine, bile and feces.

References

Notes

  1. ^ Medical News Today (August 16 2007). "Romark Initiates Clinical Trial Of Alinia® For Chronic Hepatitis C In The United States". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  2. ^ Franciscus, Alan (October 2 2007). Hepatitis C Treatments in Current Clinical Development. HCV Advocate. Retrieved on 2007-10-11.

Sources

  • Mosby's Drug Consult 16th Edition (2006)
  • Nitazoxanide. MedlinePlus Drug Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine (January 1 2006). Retrieved on 2007-10-11.
  • Romark Pharmaceuticals. Alinia® (nitazoxanide) tablets and for oral suspension prescribing information. Tampa, FL: 2005 Jun.
  • (2004) "Parasitic infections". Am J Transplant 4 Suppl 10: 142–55. doi:10.1111/j.1600-6135.2004.00677.x. PMID 15504227.


 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Nitazoxanide". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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