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Dickson Prize



The Dickson Prize in Medicine and the Dickson Prize in Science were both established in 1969 by Joseph Z. Dickson and Agnes Fischer Dickson. As of 2006, 11 of the recipients had gone on to win the Nobel Prize.[1]

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Dickson Prize in Medicine

The Dickson Prize in Medicine is awarded annually by the University of Pittsburgh, and recognizes those who have made "significant, progressive contributions" to medicine. The award includes $50,000, a bronze medal, and the Dickson Prize Lecture.

  • 1970–1971 Earl W. Sutherland Jr.
  • 1971–1972 Solomon A. Berson and Rosalyn S. Yalow
  • 1972–1973 John H. Gibbon Jr.[2]
  • 1973–1974 Stephen W. Kuffler
  • 1974–1975 Elizabeth F. Neufeld
  • 1975–1976 Frank J. Dixon
  • 1976–1977 Roger Guillemin
  • 1977–1978 Paul Greengard
  • 1978–1979 Bert W. O’Malley
  • 1979–1980 David H. Hubel and Torsten N. Wiesel
  • 1980–1981 Philip Leder
  • 1981–1982 Francis H. Ruddle
  • 1982–1983 Eric R. Kandel
  • 1983–1984 Solomon H. Snyder
  • 1984–1985 Robert C. Gallo
  • 1985–1986 J. Michael Bishop
  • 1986–1987 Elvin A. Kabat
  • 1987–1988 Leroy E. Hood
  • 1988–1989 Bernard Moss
  • 1989–1990 Ernst Knobil
  • 1990–1991 Phillip A. Sharp
  • 1991–1992 Francis Sellers Collins
  • 1992–1993 Stanley B. Prusiner
  • 1993–1994 Bert Vogelstein
  • 1994–1995 Ronald M. Evans
  • 1995–1996 Philippa Marrack
  • 1996–1997 Edward Everett Harlow Jr. and Eric Steven Lander
  • 1997–1998 Richard D. Klausner
  • 1998–1999 James E. Darnell Jr.
  • 1999–2000 Elizabeth H. Blackburn (Dickson Prize Lecture, April 13, 2000: "Telomere Capping and Cell Proliferation"[3])
  • 2000–2001 Robert G. Roeder
  • 2001–2002 C. David Allis (Dickson Prize Lecture, Sept. 18, 2002: “Translating the Histone Code: A Tale of Tails")[4]
  • 2002–2003 Susan L. Lindquist (Dickson Prize Lecture, Sept. 24, 2003: "Protein Conformation as a Pathway to Understanding Cellular Processes, Disease and Bio-Inspired Materials"[5])
  • 2003–2004 Elaine Fuchs
  • 2004–2005 Ronald W. Davis
  • 2005–2006 Roger D. Kornberg (Dickson Prize Lecture, Oct. 5, 2006: "Chromatin and Transcription"[6])
  • 2006–2007 Carol W. Greider (Dickson Prize Lecture, scheduled Oct. 11, 2007: "Telomerase and the Consequences of Telomere Dysfunction"[7]

Dickson Prize in Science

The Dickson Prize in Science is awarded annually by Carnegie Mellon University, and recognizes those who have "notably advanced the field of science".

Award recipients by year

  • 1970 Richard Bellman
  • 1971 George Palade and Keith Roberts Porter
  • 1972
  • 1973 Elias J. Corey
  • 1974
  • 1975
  • 1976
  • 1977 John H. Sinfelt
  • 1978 Seymour Benzer
  • 1979
  • 1980 Dan Schechtman
  • 1981 John Werner Cahn
  • 1982 Harden M. McConnell
  • 1983 Solomon H. Snyder
  • 1984
  • 1985 Norman Davidson
  • 1986
  • 1987
  • 1988 Joan A. Steitz
  • 1989
  • 1990 Phillip Sharp
  • 1991 F. Sherwood Rowland
  • 1992
  • 1993 Paul Lauterbur, Bert Vogelstein
  • 1994 Ray Kurzweil
  • 1995
  • 1996 John P. Hirth
  • 1997
  • 1998 Peter Shor, 25th recipient (Dickson Lecture, Nov. 8, 1999, "Quantum Computing"[8])
  • 1999 Howard Raiffa (Dickson Lecture, Tue. April 4, 2000: "Analytical Roots of a Decision Scientist"[9]
  • 2000 Alexander Pines (Dickson Lecture, April 11, 2001: "Some Magnetic Moments"[10]
  • 2001 Carver Mead (Dickson Lecture, March 19, 2002: "The Coming Revolution in Photography")[11]
  • 2002 Robert Langer (Dickson Lecture, Feb. 26, 2003: "Biomaterials And How They Will Change Our Lives")
  • 2003 Marc W. Kirschner (Dickson Lecture, March 30, 2004: "Timing the Inner Cell Cycle"[12])
  • 2004 George Whitesides (Dickson Lecture, March 28, 2005: "Assumptions: If common assumptions about the modern world break down, then what could science and technology make happen?")
  • 2005 David Haussler (Dickson Lecture, March 9, 2006: "Ultraconserved elements, living fossil transposons, and rapid bursts of change: reconstructing the uneven evolutionary history of the human genome"[13]
  • 2006 Jared Diamond (Dickson Lecture, March 26, 2007: "Collapse")[14]

Award recipients, year unknown

Further reading

  • Dixon Prize archives (1967-2003), Carnegie Institute of Technology, Records, Carnegie Mellon University Archives


Notes

  1. ^ The Mercury News, Oct. 5, 2006.
  2. ^ Finding Aid to the John H. Gibbon Papers, 1903-1956, including the Dickson Prize Talk
  3. ^ University of Pittsburgh, University Times, v.32, n.16 (April 13, 2000).
  4. ^ Science 2002 Schedule (PDF).
  5. ^ Whitehead Institute press release
  6. ^ Medical News Today
  7. ^ University of Pittsburgh Science2007 Schedule
  8. ^ Univ. of Pittsburgh Colloquium Dates & Schedules
  9. ^ University of Pittsburgh calendar
  10. ^ CMU Chemistry Dept.
  11. ^ CMU
  12. ^ CMU Press Release
  13. ^ Seminars on Algorithms and Complexity
  14. ^ Carnegie-Mellon University
  15. ^ NNDB
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Dickson_Prize". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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