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Panama Red



Panama Red, Panamanian Red,[1] or P.R.[2] is a cultivar of cannabis sativa, popular among cannabis afficiandos of the 1960s and 1970s, and renowned for its potency.[3][4][5] The typically high THC levels associated with the variety are thought to be dependent on the cultivar, rather than the Panamanian climate.[6][7] In a limited test, an Auburn University researcher reported that "seed of a sample of Panama Red, grown in the very different climates of the Canal Zone, campus and northern New Hampshire, yielded marijuana with similar THC content."[7] Its name comes from its cultivation in the country of Panama, and its claylike red color.[8] Production was common in Panama's sparsely-populated Pearl Islands.[9] It is known for causing a racy, paranoia-inducing, psychedelic high. Cannabis culture died off in Panama with the rise of cocaine trafficking.

Additional recommended knowledge

"Panama Red" was a song played by Jerry Garcia with Peter Rowan in Old and in the Way in 1973. It was also recorded and played by the New Riders of the Purple Sage on The Adventures of Panama Red, becoming the group's only radio hit. This particular type of cannabis is also mentioned in the song "Amsterdam" by Van Halen. During the seminal Vietnam War film Apocalypse Now, the character "Chef" specifically requests "Panama Red" cannabis from a military quartermaster.

Notes

  1. ^ Dalzell, Tom and Terry Victor. (2005.) [http://books.google.com/books?id=mAdUqLrKw4YC&pg=PA1439&dq=panama.red+marijuana&sig=M1A48Y5i1-SL3Kv0nt4S1LlXcLU "The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Volume II: J–Z." Taylor & Francis, page 1439. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  2. ^ Campbell, Reginald L., R. Everett Langford. (1995.) "Substance Abuse in the Workplace." CRC Press, page 185. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  3. ^ Keays, Jim. (1999.) "His Master's Voice", Allen & Unwin, page 164. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  4. ^ House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control. (1989.) "Legalization of Illicit Drugs: Impact and Feasibility, part I; Hearings before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control, House of Representatives." U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, D. C., page 398. Y 4.N16:100-2-10, GPO shipping list no.: 89-266-P (pts. I-II). Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  5. ^ Geller, Allen, Maxwell Boas. (1969.) "The Drug Beat." Cowles Book Co., page xx. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  6. ^ U.S. Department of Health Education and Welfare (1971.) "Marihuana and Health: A Report to Congress from the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health Education and Welfare." U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, D. C., page 14. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  7. ^ a b Doorenbos, Norman J. (April 2004.) "Botanical Note." Economic Botany, vol. 58, no. 2, DOI: 10.1663/0013-0001(2004)058[0172:BN]2.0.CO;2.
  8. ^ Girdano, Daniel A., Dorothy Dusek. (1980.) [Drugs: A Factual Account." Addison-Wesley Longman, Limited, ISBN 0201029626, page 75. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  9. ^ Pardey, Lin and Larry Pardey. (1992.) "Cruising in Seraffyn." Sheridan House, Inc., page 82. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.

References

  • SongFacts - Panama Red. Retrieved on November 26, 2006.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Panama_Red". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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