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Nabidh



Nabidh was an intoxicating beverage.

Additional recommended knowledge

Narrated Abu Hurayrah:

I knew that the Apostle of Allah (peace_be_upon_him) used to keep fast. I waited for the day when he did not fast to present him the drink (nabidh) which I made in a pumpkin. I then brought it to him while it fermented. He said: Throw it to this wall, for this is a drink of the one who does not believe in Allah and the Last Day. [1]


"Whilst on his deathbed, Umar became deeply affected by the wound and his physician asked Umar 'Which alcohol would you like to drink?' Umar said 'alcohol called nabidh is my preferred choice. This drink was then administered to Umar".[2]


Yahya related to me from Malik from Yahya ibn Said from Abd ar-Rahman ibn al-Qasim that Aslam, the mawla of Umar ibn al-Khattab informed him that he had visited Abdullah ibn Ayyash al-Makhzumi. He saw that he had some nabidh with him and he was at that moment on the way to Makka. Aslam said to him, Umar ibn al-Khattab loves this drink." Abdullah ibn Ayyash therefore carried a great drinking bowl and brought it to Umar ibn al-Khattab and placed it before him. Umar brought it near to him and then raised his head. Umar said, "This drink is good," so he drank some of it and then passed it to a man on his right.[3]


Ibn Fadlan

Muslim writer Ibn Fadlan states that it was drunken by the Vikings [4].

Brewed for ten days, nabidh was probably alcohol-based and may have included henbane, cannabis, and/or opium [4].

Fadlan describes the drink being given to a female slave who was sacrificed, by strangulation and stabbing, during a ship burial ceremony [4].

References

  1. ^ Sunan Abu Dawud, Book 26, Number 3707
  2. ^ Riyadh al Nadira Volume 2 page 351
  3. ^ Malik Muwatta Book 45, Number 45.6.21
  4. ^ a b c Taylor, Timothy. The Buried Soul, Beacon Press, 2002, p.175-176
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Nabidh". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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