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Kin recognition



Kin recognition refers to animals' capabilities to distinguish between close genetic kin and non-kin. In evolutionary biology and in psychology, such capabilities are presumed to have evolved to serve the adaptive functions of kin altruism (see kin selection) and inbreeding avoidance. Apart from a few exceptional cases (e.g., the green-beard effect), kin recognition is achieved via several cue-based mechanisms (e.g., imprinting, phenotype matching). Because kin recognition is cue based, errors sometimes occur. A well-known example is the Westermarck effect in which unrelated individuals who spend their childhood in the same household find each other sexually unattractive.

Additional recommended knowledge

References

Lieberman, D., Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (2007). The architecture of human kin detection. Nature, 445, 727-731.

See also

Dear enemy recognition

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Kin_recognition". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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