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Isoxsuprine



Isoxsuprine, or Isoxsuprine hydrochloride, is a drug used as a vasodilator in humans and equines.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Use in equines

Reasons for use and controversy

Isoxsuprine is most commonly used to treat hoof-related problems in the horse, most commonly for laminitis and navicular disease, as its effects as a vasodilator are thought to increase circulation within the hoof to help counteract the problems associated with these conditions.

There are many veterinarians—and horsemen—who do not believe isoxsuprine to be effective. Its use is therefore rather controversial within the veterinary field.

Precautions and side-effects

Isoxsuprine may increase the animal's heart rate, cause changes in blood pressure, and irritate the GI tract. It should therefore be used with caution if conbined with other drugs that affect blood pressure, such as sedatives and anesthetic drugs Because it is a vasodilator, it should not be used in horses that are bleeding, or in mares following foaling.

Isoxsuprine is a prohibited class B drug in FEI-regulated competition, and is often prohibited by other equine associations. It may be detected in the urine for several weeks or months following administration. It is therefore important to check the drug-rules within an animal's given competitive organization, before administering the drug.

Administration

Isoxsurpine is given orally, and many horses find the pills quite palatable.

Sources

  1. Forney, Barbara C, MS, VMD.Equine Medications, Revised Edition. Blood Horse Publications. Lexington, KY. Copyright 2007.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Isoxsuprine". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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