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Farrier



    A farrier is a specialist in equine hoof care, including the trimming and balancing of a horse's hoof so as to fit shoes to the horse's foot. A farrier couples a subset of the blacksmith's skills (fabricating, adapting, and adjusting metal shoes) with a subset of veterinary medicine (knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb) to address the care of the horse's feet.

Additional recommended knowledge

At one time, farrier and blacksmith were all but synonymous. A farrier's work in colonial America or pre-industrial revolution Europe would have included horseshoeing as well as the fabrication and repair of tools, the forging of architectural pieces, etc. Today, farriers usually specialize in horseshoeing, focusing their time and effort on the care of the horse's foot. For this reason farriers and blacksmiths are considered to be in separate, albeit related trades.

A farrier's routine work is primarily hoof trimming and shoeing. In ordinary cases it is important to trim each hoof so that it retains its proper orientation to the ground. If the animal has a heavy work load, works on abrasive footing, needs additional traction, or has pathological changes in the foot, then shoes may be required.

Additional tasks for the farrier include dealing with injured and/or diseased hooves and application of special shoes for racing, training or "cosmetic" purposes. In cases of horses with certain diseases or injuries, special repairative procedures may be needed for the hooves, and then special shoes may need to be constructed and fitted.

See also

  • The Brotherhood Of Working Farriers Association
  • The Guild of Professional Farriers
  • The Farriers Registration Council
  • American Farrier's Association
  • Museum of Horse Shoeing Tools
  • On The Horse's Foot
  • Anvil Magazine
  • The United Kingdom Horse Shoers Union
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Farrier". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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