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Drama therapy



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Drama therapy, also known as the single word Dramatherapy outside the US, is the intentional use of theater techniques to facilitate personal growth and promote health. Drama therapy is an expressive therapy modality used in a wide variety of settings, including hospitals, schools, mental health centers, prisons, and businesses. Drama therapy exists in many forms and can be applicable to individuals, couples, families, and various groups.

Additional recommended knowledge

The use of dramatic process and theater as a therapeutic intervention began with Psychodrama. The field has expanded to allow many forms of theatrical interventions as therapy including role-play, theater games, group-dynamic games, mime, puppetry, and other improvisational techniques. Often, drama therapy is utilized to help a client:

  • Solve a problem
  • Achieve a catharsis
  • Delve into truths about self
  • Understand the meaning of personally resonate images
  • Explore and transcend unhealthy patterns of interaction

Drama therapy is extremely varied in its use, based on the practitioner, the setting and the client. From fully-fledged performances to empty chair role-play, the sessions may involve many variables including the use of a troupe of actors.

See also

  • Art Therapy
  • Theraplay
  • Psychology
  • Psychodrama
  • Theater of the Oppressed
  • Playback Theatre
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Drama_therapy". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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