My watch list
my.bionity.com  
Login  

Camp Setebaid



Camp Setebaid is a camp for children and teens ages 8-17 with diabetes. It is located west of Wilkes-Barre in the mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania. It has been serving children with Type 1 diabetes since 1978. The name Setebaid is "diabetes" spelled backwards, which was suggested by campers in the early 1980s. Campers at Setebaid sleep in platform-style tents with 4 or 5 beds in each tent. The campgrounds feature a large swimming pool, playing fields, a lake, hiking trails, and mountains. Camp Setebaid is accredited by the National Camp Association.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Overview

History

Camp Setebaid, which is on the campgrounds of Camp Louise, has provided friendship and a fun place for diabetics to go in the summer since August 1978. Since then, memories and traditions have lived on, such as campfire songs, hikes, boating, and archery.

Activities

Activities at camp consist of, but are not limited to: arts and crafts, boating and canoeing, field games, fishing, hiking, singing, swimming, and nature lore. For the teen session of camp, campers choose different camp electives that they focus on. Electives include photography, water sports, nature learning, cooking, and CSI (crime scene investigation). One activity that you would expect at a camp that is especially done at Camp Setebaid is talking. Campers talk about their diabetes, when they were diagnosed, and how they deal with everyday challenges while having the barrier of diabetes.

Diabetes Care

Physicians, nurses, dietitians, and insulin pump trainers live on-site 24 hours a day with the campers and even participate in the camp activities. Campers are educated each day about taking critical note of their blood sugars and keeping their health in mind. Certified diabetes educators, physicians, nurses, and dietitians use a team approach while working with the campers to develop diabetes management techniques.

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Camp_Setebaid". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE