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How GMOs are regulated… or not

Set your gene guns to stun as we explore the curious landscape of GMO regulations in the U.S.


Critics say the Obama Administration balked on an opportunity to update Reagan-era guidelines on how agencies like the Department of Agriculture regulate foods with edited genes. What does this means for GMO foods looking to make it to market in the era of CRISPR? Ryan Cross examines the implications in this episode of Speaking of Chemistry.

As we mentioned in the video, USDA and the Food & Drug Administration are requesting your comments on updates to some biotech regulations. Here are the links to those:

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