My watch list
my.bionity.com  
Login  

When the cure kills—CBD limits biodiversity research

The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) commits its 196 nation parties to conserve biological diversity, use its components sustainably, and share fairly and equitably the benefits from the utilization of genetic resources. The last of these objectives was further codified in the Convention's Nagoya Protocol (NP), which came into effect in 2014. Although these aspirations are laudable, the NP and resulting national ambitions on Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS) of genetic resources have generated several national regulatory regimes fraught with unintended consequences ( 1 ). Anticipated benefits from the commercial use of genetic resources, especially those that might flow to local or indigenous communities because of regulated access to those resources, have largely been exaggerated and not yet realized. Instead, national regulations created in anticipation of commercial benefits, particularly in many countries that are rich in biodiversity, have curtailed biodiversity research by in-country scientists as well as international collaboration ( 1 ). This weakens the first and foremost objective of the CBD—conservation of biological diversity. We suggest ways that the Conference of the Parties (CoP) of the CBD may proactively engage scientists to create a regulatory environment conducive to advancing biodiversity science.

Authors:   K. Divakaran Prathapan; Rohan Pethiyagoda; Kamaljit S. Bawa; Peter H. Raven; Priyadarsanan Dharma Rajan; 172 co-signatories from 35 countries
Journal:   Science
Volume:   360
edition:   6396
Year:   2018
Pages:   1405
DOI:   10.1126/science.aat9844
Publication date:   29-Jun-2018
Facts, background information, dossiers
  • biodiversity
  • regulations
  • flow
  • environment
More about Science International / AAAS
  • Publications

    Random number generators go public

    On 10 July, researchers in Chile will unveil an online public random number service. Later in July, the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will launch its Randomness Beacon as a permanent service, upgrading a pilot program that began in 2013. Brazil, too, is planning ... more

    See-through solar cells could power offices

    Solar windows turn some of the light shining through into electricity. They've been on the market for years. But many of these windows absorb some visible light, leaving them with a reddish or brownish hue, a trait frowned on by architects. Now, new versions are on the way that absorb invis ... more

    The power of many

    Three billion years ago, more or less, life crossed a threshold and began moving toward a multicellular existence. Evidence from multiple directions is showing how this hard-to-fathom leap might have been less difficult than once believed. The evolutionary histories of some groups of organi ... more

  • News

    Merck Named a Top Employer by Science Magazine

    Merck announced it was ranked fourth among biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies worldwide by Science magazine, a leading peer-reviewed international scientific publication. This ranking marks the fourth year in a row Merck was named one of the top 20 employers in the healthcare and li ... more

    Merck Named as Top Employer by Science Magazine

    Merck announced it was named number 11 among the top 20 employers in the global biopharmaceutical industry by Science magazine, a leading peer-reviewed international scientific publication. This is the third year in a row that Merck, including EMD Serono in the United States, has been named ... more

Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE