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Viruses, Vol. 10, Pages 337: Visualizing Viral Infection In Vivo by Multi-Photon Intravital Microscopy

Viruses, Vol. 10, Pages 337: Visualizing Viral Infection In Vivo by Multi-Photon Intravital Microscopy

Viruses doi: 10.3390/v10060337

Authors: Xaver Sewald

Viral pathogens have adapted to the host organism to exploit the cellular machinery for virus replication and to modulate the host cells for efficient systemic dissemination and immune evasion. Much of our knowledge of the effects that virus infections have on cells originates from in vitro imaging studies using experimental culture systems consisting of cell lines and primary cells. Recently, intravital microscopy using multi-photon excitation of fluorophores has been applied to observe virus dissemination and pathogenesis in real-time under physiological conditions in living organisms. Critical steps during viral infection and pathogenesis could be studied by direct visualization of fluorescent virus particles, virus-infected cells, and the immune response to viral infection. In this review, I summarize the latest research on in vivo studies of viral infections using multi-photon intravital microscopy (MP-IVM). Initially, the underlying principle of multi-photon microscopy is introduced and experimental challenges during microsurgical animal preparation and fluorescent labeling strategies for intravital imaging are discussed. I will further highlight recent studies that combine MP-IVM with optogenetic tools and transcriptional analysis as a powerful approach to extend the significance of in vivo imaging studies of viral pathogens.

Authors:   Sewald, Xaver
Journal:   Viruses
Volume:   10
edition:   6
Year:   2018
Pages:   337
DOI:   10.3390/v10060337
Publication date:   20-Jun-2018
Facts, background information, dossiers
  • infections
  • Research
  • particles
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