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Immune reaction causes malaria organ damage

Immune cells can be the body's defenders and foes at the same time

21-Oct-2019

Malaria is one of the world's deadliest infectious diseases: a small mosquito bite delivers numerous malaria parasites into the bloodstream. The human body defends itself valiantly against the parasite, which usually results in periodic flu-like symptoms and severe fever. Severe cases of the ...

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Stem cells moonlight to protect the stomach from bacterial invaders

A subpopulation of stem cells releases antimicrobial peptides to defend the gastric mucosa against pathogenic bacteria

01-Jul-2019

Our mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to numerous bacterial species, some of which can induce DNA damage in host cells. Normally this remains inconsequential, as the rapid turnover of the mucosa means damaged cells are shed within days. However, if the long-lived stem cells that continually ...

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Malaria: It’s all about the mosquito

The relative frequency of two mosquito species determines the risk of transmission to humans

03-Apr-2019

Mosquitoes transmit malaria, but not every malaria-infected mosquito is the same. An international team led by Elena Levashina from the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin has described in a new publication that some species of mosquitoes are better in transmitting Plasmodium ...

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Organoids reveal inflammatory processes in chlamydia infections

Researchers discover how bacteria could promote inflammation and the development of ovarian cancer

20-Mar-2019

For a long time, researchers were only able to examine human cells infected with bacteria by using cancer cell lines. However, these transformed cells often give a false impression of the infection process. Fallopian tube organoids from normal human fallopian tube cells, on the other hand, ...

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Helicobacter creates immune system blind spot

By extracting cholesterol from host cell membranes, Helicobacter pylori generates “micro-islands”

16-Mar-2018

The gastric bacterium H. pylori colonizes the stomachs of around half the human population and can lead to the development of gastric cancer. It is usually acquired in childhood and persists life-long, despite a strong inflammatory defence reaction in the gastric mucosa. Such inflammation is ...

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Are stem cells the link between bacteria and cancer?

New mechanism of stomach gland regeneration reveals impact of Helicobacter pylori infection

21-Aug-2017

Gastric carcinoma is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths, primarily because most patients present at an advanced stage of the disease. The main cause of this cancer is the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which chronically infects around half of all humans. However, unlike tumour ...

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Blood test for tuberculosis

Biomarkers may be able to predict the risk of developing tuberculosis in future

30-Mar-2016

Together with AIDS, tuberculosis ranks among those infectious diseases with the highest global mortality rate, claiming the lives of between 1.5 and two million people every year. However, not everyone infected with the bacterium develops tuberculosis. In fact, fewer than ten percent of those ...

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On the way to a new tuberculosis vaccine

VPM1002 is being tested in clinical trials as a tuberculosis vaccine in newborns and as a drug against cancer of the bladder

25-Mar-2015

The only tuberculosis vaccine currently approved, the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, protects children from the most severe forms of the disease in most cases but does not provide protection against the most common form, pulmonary tuberculosis in adults and children. BCG has therefore ...

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New weapon of the immune system discovered

Aryl hydrocarbon receptor binds bacterial toxins and initiates their destruction

15-Aug-2014

Max Planck researchers have discovered a completely new way in which the immune system recognizes pathogens. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor has long been a focus of research for pharma-cologists and toxicologists, as it recognizes environmental toxins. However, it also plays an important role in ...

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QIAGEN and Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology collaborate to develop assay for active TB risk in individuals with latent infection

11-Jan-2012

QIAGEN N.V. and the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology (MPIIB), Department of Immunology have announced a new collaboration to develop a molecular diagnostic test to assess the risk of an individual with latent tuberculosis (TB) developing active TB disease during their lifetime. ...

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